Fiberglass Shower Floor


  #1  
Old 11-26-04, 08:25 AM
kwterry
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Fiberglass Shower Floor

I have a fiberglass shower stall that has some cracks in the bottom pan or floor. I have previously used caulking to successfully spot repair a crack that had caused water to seep out under the bottom. Is there something that could be applied to reseal the entire floor without replacing the bottom pan?
 
  #2  
Old 11-27-04, 11:27 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,528
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Only thing I can think of is a non-slip floormat. They have one that is cery thin and goes down like contact paper. I will give you a link to one of my suppliers. It opens up in pdf format I think. Talk to them about it

http://www.napcoltd.com/catalog/bathware.pdf
 
  #3  
Old 11-29-04, 04:09 PM
jwsch
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
fiberglass shower floor

I have the same problem with cracking on the shower floor. This is the second one I've put in in the last 5 years. I was wondering in the elastomeric roof coating I used on the roof of my motorhome might work. It's waterproof, flexible, and doesn't have a bad odor. If not, I would be interested in more info about the waterproof floor mat refered to in the other letter on this subject. I tried going to the web address listed, but got a message saying the page was not available. Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 11-29-04, 05:00 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
kwterry,

Your problem seems to be similar to many when installations of the shower bases is done wrong. Trying to repair this with a band-aid approach is not going to help anyone. It also isn't going to be good when the patch effect doesn't really resolve the problem and you start to get mold and mildew growing in very bad places.


With what you and jwsch experienced may be just bad installations. This is what should be done and you would never have problems again.

I wrote this and you may find it very helpful.

"Following the directions per the manufacture for installation. Lack of support causes squeaks, in some cases leaks at drain pipe fittings and worst of all cracks in the finish material. Most manufacturers recommend or suggest installing a mortar base support under the tub or shower bottom before setting the tub or shower unit in place. You can use either a bag of Quikcrete or a 5 gallon pail of pre-mix joint compound. ( usually I use the pre-mix 5 gallon...lazy and it's less mess) You can lay poly down under the tub or shower prior to doing this to prevent any moisture issues while this is drying.

When this sets up, usually with 24-48 hours, your tub or shower bottom will be rock solid supported. This does 2 things, prevents any possibility of potential cracking within the fiberglass/acrylic and eliminates any movement at the tub/shower drain assembly or potential leaks that could happen.

Ensure that you do not get any around the tub or shower drain assembly should you need to do anything down the line. In most cases, the holes cut for the drain lines will keep any base support away from it."

Hope this helps!
 
  #5  
Old 11-29-04, 06:59 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,528
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Sorry if i missed something but I didn't get the impression anyone was looking for info on how to properly install a new shower base.

Instead I would reccomend that some holes be drilled in the base and spray some foam in and then plug just the holes with silicone flush with the base and use the mat I suggested.

If there are cracks around the drain they can also be fixed after the base is supported with the foam.

It goes without saying that a new base is the best option. My approach is a little different. I try to come at from where I think the poster is coming from. I got the distinct impression that they were looking for a fix and not a new base. Some people just don't need the expense right now and could use a little time to get some funds together for the big fix later.

I agree that there can be a mold and mildew prob but if that is the case everytime there was a leak in a bathroom or whereever it would mean a complete remodel. It may be the best choice but not really practical. I mean if I find a leak behind my shower faucet should I rip the wall apart if the tiles are still perfectly adhered to the wall just in case there is some mildew there.

This whole thing was discussed in another thread a while back maybe Doug could post the link. It may answer some questions

here is a link to the bathmats. hope it works.
http://www.thematking.com/residentia...bathtubmat.htm
 
  #6  
Old 11-29-04, 07:24 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
joneq,

Best advice was given as this is a sure way to resolve it. True, not the answer in how to repair but this would resolve it the right way.

OK, as for your bathmats, that won't resolve anything other than prevent you from falling. There are not intended to seal and waterproof anything. Your suggestion would be no better than mine if we are to stay with the original post.

Band-aid advice to use foam - it will not work. Foam in a can, regardless of minimum expansion to sustain 100 lbs in a shower will give. Been there, done that and even the professionals say it will not work. That's 10 years of experience as a Maint. Supervisor for rental properties held by reputable companies that believe in resident retention.

Have had numerous bases repaired by professionals - one day and they are done. It does cost but it can be done. I have seen them cut the base out in sections and use joint compound or hydraulic cement. Works great and they remold the base, looks like it was never touched!

There is no cheap fix other than to hire a professional. I understand that tearing it out to replace it would be time consuming and a cost. When bases are at this point, it is best to replace than repair. In some instances as you pointed out, if you have good wall tile, who would want to tear it all out just to do the base? Sometimes you just have to or at least 1 ft up from the base to install a new one. Simpler and cheaper. Of course, they should be installed properly to avoid the problem again.

Just some thoughts
 

Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 11-30-04 at 06:07 AM.
  #7  
Old 11-30-04, 06:26 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Lake Murray, SC USA
Posts: 1,413
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Spray foam is not intended to be load bearing. If in doubt, spray some on a piece of wood, wait for it to cure and step on it. It is almost like stepping on a styrofoam packing peanut.

I like Doug's approach, fix it right and permanent.

However, one other thing that might be tried, is to install a new fiberglas blanket over the base, set in fiberglas resin, and then finished with an appropriate gelcoat. This is not a terribly difficult project and most of the materials are available at big boat stores like Boater's World. However preparation and procedure are critical to get a good bond.
 
  #8  
Old 12-01-04, 08:09 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Lake Murray, SC USA
Posts: 1,413
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Welcome to DIY Forums, Bill

And thanks for sharing your expertise.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: