I'll take what's behind wall number 2, Bob


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Old 11-26-04, 03:35 PM
HomeschoolMom
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I'll take what's behind wall number 2, Bob

I am trying to plan this remodel down to every last detail before the hammering starts, because this is our only full bath. We live in a cement block house but the walls in the baths and laundry room were sheetrocked. I'm not sure why, the only reason I can think of was that there are some interior walls in those rooms made from studs and that kept the walls looking uniform? Does that sound reasonable? We will be tearing out the sheetrock and we're wondering how it was attached and is it ok to leave the blocks bear as in the rest of the house. Would this be a suitable wall for a shower, or would we still need to tile over the concrete block? Thanks much.
 
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Old 11-26-04, 05:14 PM
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HomeschoolMom,

So you're at it again. Is this the bathroom that we have been talking about all along?!!

1. Unsure why you're tearing out the drywall but I assume some mold and rot issues. I would not suggest leaving block walls bare for use in the shower area. If you like mold and mildew, you are asking for trouble. I would also assume that you have or should install a good bath exhaust fan. This really helps control these issues.

2. I would replace any studs, if not all, that are damaged. The can be reinstalled by using W/T as standard studs against block wall is not to Code. These can be reattached by Ramset or TapCon screws. I am assuming these are on main floor and not in a basement. Unsure how yours are attached now, may be just adhesive or nails or screws. Break out the crowbar!

3. For the shower area, use Durock (cement board) If you need further informtion on that I can assist or read prior postings. Do a search for ceramic tile and showers. I recommend ceramic tile or a prefab shower unit or prefab shower base and wall suround appliactions if the tile would be difficult to tackle.

From past postings with you, I am assuming that if given enough information, you can do pretty much anything once you put your mind to it!

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 11-27-04, 12:59 AM
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Douglas,

Yep, the very same. I'll try to give you more info. in the same format that you addressed your questions in.

1. Tearing out the drywall for the following reasons:
--removing a one-piece tub/shower that has drywall above the
fiberglass part. This will be an enclosed toilet area/room, 3'x5'.
--removing the stud wall that separates the laundry room from the
bath, we're expanding the bath into the laundry room.
--the laundry room wall will be the tub and shower areas (separate
drop-in whirlpool with tile deck and 36"x60" shower). I assume this
drywall has to come out because I'm sure it's just sheetrock and I
would assume that we would need to have durock under the tile
or acrylic shower surround wall, whichever we decide to go with. Or
would the cement block be OK to have under either tile or acrylic?
Yes, we are upgrading the exhaust fan but we do not have any mold or rot.

2. No stud damage. The only stud walls are the ones separating the bath from the laundry room and the shower from the toilet area. My dad (he built our house) did not stud over the cement block. One story house, no basement. Have I mentioned the house is on a concrete pad? So moving the toilet is a real pain, so the plumber says.

3. If we go with acrylic shower surround couldn't we just attach that to the cement block since, in theory, the acrylic should be waterproof?


"From past postings with you, I am assuming that if given enough information, you can do pretty much anything once you put your mind to it!"
Wish my husband had your confidence in me!!! This project is pretty much up to me, hence, he is not all that fired up to start it. That's why I have to get all my ducks in a row and in triplicate before I start. I really appreciate all your help. How do you have time to do all this?

Lelah
 
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Old 11-27-04, 05:22 AM
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Lelah,

Good Morning,

The issue with shower surround and/or base is that it needs to be placed against a "flat" surface. Some surrounds are placed directly to the studs due to the nailing flange that they have. Others are placed directly to the drywall surface for adhesive application. Concrete block is not "flat" and has variations to it vertically and horizontially. This is why wood studs,drywall and then Durock is so important if doing tile. Again the type of finish wall application you choose determines if it is drywall or Durock (for tile). You must review the installation instructions but do not apply directly over the concrete block.

All of the Moderators here are volunteers. Some retired and others active professionals within their own fields. We take the time to assist others and for some of us like myself, taking a break once in awhile is good from my designing and drafting. We all desire to help others avoid costly or even dangerous mistakes. We have many members who also possess various experiences and we invite all to help each other as long as the information is accurate and helpful. As ususally, we stress that those on the Forum follow our Forum policies which maintains the professionalism we strive for.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 11-27-04, 07:47 AM
HomeschoolMom
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Douglas,

I'm a bit confused, can I attach the Durock directly to the concrete block?

I'm very sorry if I was too light hearted or personal in any of my posts. I certainly did not mean to detract from the professionalism that this board maintains. I will, in the future limit my discussion to the topic at hand.

Thank you again for your time.

Lelah
 
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Old 11-27-04, 08:17 AM
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Lelah,

You can attach Durock to the wall but I said a "flat surface". Block has too many variations as compared to a stud wall.

You are not giving me a reason why the insistance on applying it directly to the block wall? I would think some added insulation would provide more warmth but the key is to have an easy application of the product(s) with good results.

You must install Durock as per manufactures specifications. Adhesive will not work and applying fasteners must be done to ensure that the screws do not penetrate the fiber mesh which lessens it's fastening strength. This is why I stress 2x4 then Durock and tile (if applicable) I don't recommend direct fastening to cement block regardless of your final finish intentions. Check this link out.

http://www.cgcinc.com/pdf/install/EDR_00D6.pdf

Don't apologize, we are all good natured around here.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 11-27-04, 09:24 AM
HomeschoolMom
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I am trying to maximize our space, by not adding any more "layers" than I have to. When you said a "flat surface" I thought you were referring to what the tile has to attach to, not the durock.The walls are all interior so I didn't think the insulation a concern. I will go now and read up on Durock installation. Thanks.
 
 

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