Adding a Full Bathroom to Basement


  #1  
Old 02-02-05, 10:05 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 114
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Adding a Full Bathroom to Basement

Hello All. I've been remodeling my basement and have gradually worked my way around the different sections of the forums as I've come to that part of my build... everyone has been MOST helpful. This website is a godsend.

At any rate, I'm at the point where I want to add a full bathroom. I got a quote for $4000 to dig up the concrete floor, backfill, lay the pipes, etc. Seems excessive, right? Now, I'm a do-it-yourselfer by heart and have had good success with projects in the past, but this seems a bit daunting. Here goes:

1. Is this job too complicated for the weekend do-it-yourselfer?
2. Would I save a lot of money by digging the concrete at least?
3. How would I vent the room? Could I vent it out the side of the house?
4. If it's doable, are there any resources, guidelines or books that you would recommend?

Thanks in advance.
 
  #2  
Old 02-02-05, 10:16 AM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,475
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
The job is not too complicated, only demanding. You have to go by codes for your area. This means getting permits and doing it by the book. It will have to be inspected. 2) Anytime you do a portion of the work yourself, it will save you money. Just make sure you do it the way the person doing the rest of the work wants or needs to prevent arguments later. 3) The vents have to go out the roof. It may be possible to tie into the existing vents. Thats one of those code things. 4) Your local code office may have drawings on what has to be done. You may have to buy a code book. There are plumbing sites that explain what the book means, including asking questions here. We cannot advise you to go against your code. We can however assist you with any problem areas you may encounter. Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 02-02-05, 02:54 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 114
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
When I mentioned "venting" I was referring to exhaust fans. Are we on the same page here or were you talking about the plumbing vent?

Sorry for the confusion.
 
  #4  
Old 02-02-05, 03:03 PM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,475
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Wrong page!!! There should be no problem venting out the side of the house. Just make sure you get a critterproof vent cap.
 
  #5  
Old 02-02-05, 03:07 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
sinTAKS,

MJ forgot to say it's a a Code requirement to vent the exhaust fan out of the home. There are different types of outside vent caps available for walls with screen.

Good Luck!
 
  #6  
Old 02-02-05, 06:25 PM
IHI's Avatar
IHI
IHI is offline
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: central Iowa
Posts: 445
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Is the $4K for ALL the work-they walk into a bare nothing, they walk out and you have a completed bathroom? If it's the latter, you should jump on it if you can afford it, as that price for what's being done is not excessive at all. A typical bath remodel I get a minimum of $5K and that for a 8'x5' space with nothing frivilous at all, just an update.

Obviously the more work YOU do the less it's gonna cost, so you need to decide what you can do, talk with the contractor letting him know exactly what you wanna do and get a price. By doing this, YOU will now be under the gun to have predetermined aspects done by a certain time so not to hold up the contractor. He will have a schedule for your job and others going on at the same time, a set back on your project because you missed a date WILL COST YOU MONEY!!! You wil also need to stay in constant communication so whatever your aspect will be gets done properly, becasue if you dont hit the mark the first time, it will COST YOU MONEY! since whent he contractor shows back up to di his thing and has to fix your thing before he can do his thing...etc see where I'm going

It can be done, I've done it with my customers and still do it quite a bit. Sometimes it's a relief if homie wants to do this or that, because I know what's involved and actually grin to myself as I walk to my truck when they confirm "we're going to do this part"
 
  #7  
Old 02-03-05, 05:53 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 114
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Actually, the $4K encompasses digging the concrete and installing the pipework but NOT the finished product. I'd have to come through and install the shower, sink, toilet, etc. This is my first go around so I'm not sure if that's high or not... it's more than I thought it would be!! What I'm planning to do is get several quotes so that I can get a general idea for what it costs. From what I'm gathering, the work is pretty demanding and time consuming. It may be worth the money to have someone do it. It would just feel incomplete, as I've done 100% of the remodel so far. My pride would take a hit *sigh*

Thanks for the advice.
 
  #8  
Old 02-03-05, 06:32 AM
IHI's Avatar
IHI
IHI is offline
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: central Iowa
Posts: 445
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
That's alittle pricey IMO if all they're doing id removing the necessary concrete and tying into your existing sewer. I'm not saying that aspect is for the typical DIY, but it's also not rocket science either, epecially given the fact they're low pressure lines.

Hard to say with 100% confidence if it's too much or not since we cannot see what they need to do in your basement to make it happen or the market in your area. It may be right on track for your area, but that's waay outragious here and hopefully you'll see that in getting more bids.

After all these years experience in construction with different projects, let me tell you, DO NOT feel belittled or less proud becasue you hire out an aspect of a job. Yes it can be expensive, but the benefit is thta your getting the job done right so there should be no problems in the future. If there is a problem, you make a call and they fix the problem on their tab not yours. After you've dont enough jobs and learn the hard way, writing a check is often the best solution to any problem-knowing your limitations is what your should be proud of because pride alone will get you into all sorts of trouble.
 
  #9  
Old 02-03-05, 07:21 AM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,475
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
One more thing that I have found to be true (not fair but true) is that some inspectors look REAL hard at a DIY project. Most inspectors come from companies in the area (retirees) and try to make it hard on a DIYer to help out the local busnesses. Not true ALL the time but it DOES happen. If you DIY it, know the code and if an inspector tries to intimidate you, make him show it to you in writing from the code book.
True story: I was having a porch and a concrete pad (50 feet apart) for my car installed at the same time. In the part of Florida where I lived, a concrete contractor could not pull the permit. Property owner had to do it. Since I knew nothing about concrete, I took my contractor to the permit office with me and had the Head Inspector show him what had to be done and make the drawings. When the traveling inspector came out to do the inspection he didn't even know which was the pad and which was the porch (TRUE I SWEAR). Found out he was a retired Electrical inspector from New York. He was unreasonable and I ended up calling the Inspection office and had him removed from my job. Titles don't always mean knowledge. Good luck.
 
  #10  
Old 02-03-05, 08:17 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 114
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Permits, ah yes. Guess I should look into getting one of those huh? Here's a good question... if I didn't get one for previous work that I've done, what will happen? Can I plead ignorance, because I truly did not know that I needed a permit to frame wall. Should I not bother, or take my chances and get a permit,even though some work is completed?

You guys have me worried.
 
  #11  
Old 02-03-05, 08:28 AM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,475
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I would get one for the plumbing. Too much to tear out if you get caught later. The walls....plead ignorance if they notice it. Most places, the fine for unpermitted work is a set fee. Sometimes it is a multiple of the permit cost plus a small fine. Plumbing, they probably would want to see every joint and you know how much work that would be.
 
  #12  
Old 02-10-05, 01:08 PM
rogerb
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Greetings from the frozen north. I am in Canada. I charge about $1600.00 Canadian dollars to do the rough in connections for a basement bathroom when I am doing the entire renovation. This includes breaking the floor and drain roughins for a toilet, tub/shower, and sink or vanity. If I have to connect farther than 10 feet from the new bathroom there is additional charges but nowhere near $4000.00. I do not chase this type of work, but if it fell into my lap and a homowner was to do everything else I would probably add a couple of hundred dollars to the job making the drain roughin part $1800.00 Canadian dollars ( About 1360.00 U.S.D) These prices are for standard residential construction with 4" of mesh re-inforced concrete. Check around. Somebody will do a LOT better than 4k. Rogerb
 
  #13  
Old 02-11-05, 09:27 AM
mjdonovan
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Talking It can be done without the contractor

I recently finished a basement, which included a bathroom. I too needed to remove a section of concrete for the plumbing.

I first had the plumber come in and mark where he wanted the floor removed. I then rented a saw from a local hardware store.

Prior to the actual cutting, prepare the surrounding area by tacking up plastic walls around where you will cut and ensure you have good ventillation, because it will get extremely dirty and dusty. Also have eye and ear protection.

I did not run water over the area prior to cutting, and the saw did not require it, however you may want to consider using some. I did not and had dust everywhere: Basement, 1st floor, and 2nd floor. The wife was not happy.

Once you have cut the sections, use a sledge hammer to break up the concrete and remove it. In my cases, I had to install a 32 gallon pump up container. The size of a trash can. You will need to dig down at least 28" such that the top of the pump up system is only a few inches above the finish floor grade. It is preferable to get it down to grade.

Well good luck. I did it in one day, but I cleaned the house for 3.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: