Tub Installation again


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Old 02-07-05, 03:39 PM
Jim D
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Tub Installation again

I have read many posts pertaining to installing a tub in a bed of mortar and am still confused.

My question is: Do I need to level the floor first ???If so, How do I level the floor?? or do I just sink the center of the tub in the mortar and level it???

The directions I got with the tub say that the feet need to set firmly on the floor.

I am concerned that if I sink it in the mortar and level it , the apron of the tub will be off the floor because the floor is low over the entire length of the apron. What do I put under the apron???

Any help would be appreciated.
 
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Old 02-07-05, 06:54 PM
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Setting a tub in mortar or other base, generally refers to an acrylic or fiberglass model.

With feet, you probably have a cast iron tub. So your best advice is to provide a firm, stable and by all means level platform.
 
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Old 02-08-05, 02:55 AM
Jim D
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Thanks for the reply

It is acrylic , the feet I refer to are 8 plastic protrusions from the bottom of the tub. The manufacturer says that these must be firmly on the floor.

If I set these in a mortor bed , I cannot see how they can be on the floor.

How would I level the floor before putting the mortar bed down??
 
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Old 02-09-05, 04:17 AM
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Have you determined that the floor is not level?

There are any number of floor leveling compounds available, some of which work better with specific substrates, IE. Wood or concrete, and also have limits in the thickness of applied material.

If leveling is required, and after it has been accomplished, preset the tub to ensure that the drain is correctly positioned.

If there is no leveling required, you can selectively place great dollops of loosely consolidated mortar WHERE THE EIGHT SUPPORT BLOCKS ARE NOT and set the tub. Be prudent in this, you do not want to interfere with the support blocks.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 04:43 AM
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Its good that you have those feet on your tub. Many tubs rely on a board mounted on the back wall to level them with and then the apron on the front. This is the only thing that supports the tub. Thats why many have to have a full bed of mortar. If not, the acrylic would crack after a time due to pressure in the center. If your floor is not level then the tub could sit with the drain being higher than the other end and you would have water sitting in the tub after use. Another thing to think about concerning level is that if you decided to tile, you would not have straight edges and would have to cut wedged type pieces of tile that would be hard to cut and look bad. Measure where the feet are and mark it on the floor. When you apply the mortar, put it inbetween the marks and slightly higher than the distance from the floor to the tub bottom. Take the time to do it right and you'll be happy for a long time. This is something you only want to do once. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 11:23 AM
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I just finished installing an acrylic tub. Mine did not have feet, but relied on a ledger that I had to build. The concept is the same though. I used Quickcrete sand topping mix, as it was recommended on this sight and it worked real well. First off, move the tub in place without any mortor. This is where it should be level. Pull the tub back out. If you are going to place it in an alcove, you are going to have to first put the mortor down, then drop the tub on top of it - you can't slide it over the mortor. I had the tub tipped back on its side, laid the mortor down, then flipped the tub down on top of it. The mortor will be under the tub bottom where the feet are NOT. if the tub bed is say 2" off the floor, make your mortor piles about3 to 4" thick, no more. When you first drop the tub on the mortor, it will be sitting up off its feet. Don't panic. Climb into it and start walking and moving around. Some of the mortor will squish out and the tub bottom will settle down right into it. put youre level back on, and it will be just as it was before you laid the mortor. Come back tomorrow and now step in. It will feel solid as a rock! Also, the Quickcrete has plenty of setup time, so you don't have to race like you would if you used plaster of paris. Ihave one more important tip for rookies, and will put it in another reply.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 11:29 AM
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Okay, here is my first tip for first timers like I was. If the tub has styrofoam strips glued to the outside edge when you unpack it, leave them there. They are for when you tip the tub up on it's side it will rest on the styrofoam, so you dont scratch the finish.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 11:47 AM
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Second tip for rookies and a biggy. Lets say, you are replacing an old tub into an existing alcove. The tub is 80" and the alcove is suposed to be 80 1/8". But actually, it is more like 80 1/4". No problem. center the tub, and you got 1/8 on each side. But here is what can really happen. Your mixing up 60 to 80lbs of concrete IN your bathroom, in a couple of different buckets, so you can lift them. The tub is up on end and you now have to climb/squeeze into the alcove and somehow hoist the mortor in with you. Dump it. spread it. Climb back out. Tip the tub (it will come down crooked at first and there will be some pushing and shoving). Get in the tub, run around, check the level. Now are now sweating like a pig, but the job is done. Whoops!! Chances are, when you tipped the tub in. it slid down one end of the alcove first. The tub is in and level, but did you make sure it was centered before you got in and squished the mortor out? Remeber that 1/4 inch extra. If you don't check to center it, you probably are flush against the studs on one end, and there is a 1/4" gap on the other and your are so tired, you don't see it. This could come back to bite you when it's time to finish the walls up. Before you climb in to set the mortor, you can shake and wiggle it back to center, and after you climb out, check it again. You can still re-center it.
 
 

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