Fiberglass tub support


  #1  
Old 03-25-05, 09:40 PM
SpelingChampeon
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Fiberglass tub support

I've read about 10 pages of posts, trying to figure out what my options are for supporting a 2 piece Lasko tub/surround. This tub will go in the ground level bathroom, in which is the entire bathroom is almost solid concrete. The major exception is where the drain is. I guess due to the old tub being cast iron, they saw no need to support around the drain, so I'm staring a a 2' by 2' patch of underthehouse dirt. I am thinking I need to set the new tub in, make sure the drain matches up, then pulling it back out and prep to install over the drain. I potentially have a couple of problems..which brought me here.

Since I bought a 2 piece (I cant get to the back of the tub once it is in place), I will have to attach the 1 piece surround before setting it in place the last time.

1. What would you recommend to solidify around the drain? Should I just pour concrete in, or would wood suffice?
2. I have read a few posts that recommend I use Quickrete to support the entire tub, but I am going to have a major problem after resetting the tub and trying to manuever/tighten down the surround piece. Are there any other ways of accomplishing this?
3. Has anyone ever used (or tried) using the spray foam insulation (commonly used to fill window gaps..etc) as a support? I have used it around the house, and I'll be darn if that stuff doesnt dry to a pretty hard piece of foam.
4. Should I lay a piece of plastic under the tub, before laying whichever support I wind up using? Wouldnt that help with future work?

I have never attempted this before, however... after reading a lot of posts, I'm feeling like I have a clue.. but I know I will start working on this project and ultimately wind up . Any help will be very much appreciated

Thank You!
 
  #2  
Old 03-26-05, 05:51 AM
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SpelingChampeon,

1. What would you recommend to solidify around the drain? Should I just pour concrete in, or would wood suffice? Read the article below

2. I have read a few posts that recommend I use Quickrete to support the entire tub, but I am going to have a major problem after resetting the tub and trying to manuever/tighten down the surround piece. Are there any other ways of accomplishing this? Read the article below

3. Has anyone ever used (or tried) using the spray foam insulation (commonly used to fill window gaps..etc) as a support? I have used it around the house, and I'll be darn if that stuff doesnt dry to a pretty hard piece of foam.

No way - step on it, it is not as hard as you think unless you acquire commercial application but even then, the slightest flex will be a problem as time goes on.

4. Should I lay a piece of plastic under the tub, before laying whichever support I wind up using? Wouldnt that help with future work? Read the article below

http://www.lascobathware.com/installation/3900.pdf (See Framing and Support) See #5 paragraph under installation page 1.

Following the directions per the manufacture for installation. Lack of support causes squeaks, in some cases leaks at drain pipe fittings and worst of all cracks in the finish material. Most manufacturers recommend or suggest installing a mortar base support under the tub bottom before setting the tub in place. You can use either a bag of Quikcrete or a 5 gallon pail of pre-mix joint compound. ( usually I use the pre-mix 5 gallon...lazy and it's less mess) You can lay poly down under the tub prior to doing this to prevent any moisture issues while this is drying.

Do a dry install, mark where your studs are located on the flange with a black marker. When you have your plumbing drain lines in the approximate location, you will still have the ability to move this upon final hook up. Ensure that this is all level when you pour your compound in - if you have a slight gap between the front skirt and floor, don't worry about it, many ways to acquire the final look. Once level, attach screws to your studs through the flange.

AVOID stepping in and out repeatedly when getting this level - have 2 people do this, one checks level, one who has some weight can help settle the unit to its final position. You do not want to create unnecessary voids below.

When this sets up, usually with 24-48 hours, your tub bottom will be rock solid supported. This does 2 things, prevents any possibility of potential cracking within the fiberglass/acrylic and eliminates any movement at the tub drain assembly or potential leaks that could happen.

Ensure that you do not get any around the tub drain assembly should you need to do anything down the line. In most cases, the holes cut for the drain lines will keep any base support away from it.

Hope this helps!
 
  #3  
Old 03-26-05, 09:23 AM
SpelingChampeon
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Originally Posted by Doug Aleshire
Ensure that you do not get any around the tub drain assembly should you need to do anything down the line. In most cases, the holes cut for the drain lines will keep any base support away from it.
Hope this helps!
Doug, thanks for your guidance. I understood all of your information, except the quote above. The open spot around the drain is about 6 inches deep, which would require a lot of mortar, should that be what I need to do, but again, I'm not comfortable with the quote above. I could take a pic of the situation and post it to you if you want. I have some more preliminary work to do before I install the tub, so I'm not under any pressure/time constraints.
 
  #4  
Old 03-26-05, 09:47 AM
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SpelingChampeon,

You're welcome.

Please disregard the quote as this was for applications on wood subfloors - I have seen others place mortar or joint compound in the wrong areas. This is one area where you do not want anything there - you need to have access to the p-trap and tub drain assembly "just in case".

The 2x2 patch you mentioned I assume is from the wall out. You just need to ensure that you have adequate support under the majority of the tub bottom.

It'll work out great! Hope this clarifies things.

Happy Easter!
 
 

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