Tub floor support/installation


  #1  
Old 04-04-05, 10:06 AM
beltman
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Question Tub floor support/installation

Hi, I am in the middle of redoing my master bathroom. Their was a stand up shower 4ft x 3 ft. The bathroom has been gutted ever since we bought it 8 months ago, was disgusting....I am down to the ply wood, which in some areas it is rotted, the house is 34 years old, townhouse in NJ. I just removed the wall between my bathroom and walkin closet. I would like to add 1 - 2 feet so I can place a tub, maybe a whirlpool tub. I would like to re-do the toilet drain and shower drain to PVC.

This is a second floor, below my bathroom is my 1/2 bath on the first floor and kitchen, and i dont want to remove the ceiling to work on this bathroom if I dont have to.

So my actual question is: What kind of support in the floor do I have to add? For installing a tub. I have more questions, I guess I'll start with tis one, thank you in advance for the information.

Barry
 
  #2  
Old 04-04-05, 11:25 AM
T
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If it is sapnning across multiple joists, probably nothing to worry about. If it's running over two joists, it may need some beefing up. You may want to post the expected size of the tub and the number of joists it will cross as well a their span and spacing and size in the articetural forum where it might get quicker response. Once that's figured out, please come over to the ceramic forum and let us help you through building your tub deck and new shower pan if you plan to build your own. In most cases though, the tub deck is built out of 2x4's, the top is covered in plywood, then cement board would be placed over the ply, set in thinset ofcourse, and the sides wrapped in 1/2" cment board., then the entire surface would be waterproofed then the tub dropped in and set in a setting bed of mortar to help level and evenly support the base. You certainly don't want to be cutting into your joists to run new plumbing and it maight be easiest to sacrifice some ceiling height in the first floor bath to allow dwv to be run. If you are doing a tiled tub deck, the tub deck would be constructed so that there is sufficient room for thinset and tile to slide under the rim of the tub, or tile first and then set the tub. The deck should not be considered suppot for the tub. Insufficient support form below can cause enough flex on the tub deck to cause a crack down the side of the tub. You also have to design the layout in such a way that you will have access to the pump assembly.
 
  #3  
Old 04-04-05, 01:34 PM
beltman
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Originally Posted by Tilebri
In most cases though, the tub deck is built out of 2x4's, the top is covered in plywood, then cement board would be placed over the ply, set in thinset ofcourse, and the sides wrapped in 1/2" cment board., then the entire surface would be waterproofed then the tub dropped in and set in a setting bed of mortar to help level and evenly support the base.

It's going to be a standard tub 72 x 32 x 20 1/2, jetted. Not a drop in jacuzzi,

I'll get the joists, I know it will be parallel with the joist... I have not taken up the plywood as of yet, cause im really not sure what to do.

This bath (master) backs my main bath in the next room, and after looking at the tub that is in there, their arent any extra support with the joist. ( i have only cut out a piece in the ply wood to stick my head in.
 
 

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