drop in whirlpool..used for shower?


  #1  
Old 04-06-05, 11:44 AM
DonMon
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drop in whirlpool..used for shower?

I'm finishing out my attic, to be a master bath and bedroom...just installed a 6foot Kohler Mariposa whirlpool...set it in a bed of mortar..in a 3 wall alcove...the tub is sitting in the alcove on a 2 X 6 surround...all the framing and deck are covered with 1/2inch HardiBacker..the tub is set in mortar with approx. 3/8th inch gap for tile and caulk under the lip of the tub,around the surround deck....I've posted this info. in other forums..but nobody can picture this simple, basic, drop in installation..sorry I don't have pictures..yet..but this has got to be a common , basic arrangement...My concern is..I'll be taking showers in it...it's what I prefer..,I've installed tile on the floor, but not the surround as of yet...I can imagine water running like a river around the surround onto the floor..and water seeping under the surround as well..I'm seeking advice on the best way to modify and prevent water problems...My idea..is to screw down wood around the surround that is taper ripped in a bevel..so that Hardibacker can be screwed onto it..about flush with the top of the fiberglass tub and tiled on top so that water will run down the slope into the tub...does this sound like a good idea?...the best answer I got in other forums is.." did you set the tub in mortar?."...Yikes!!!! ..Don
 
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Old 04-07-05, 10:34 AM
T
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A rectangular tub, then you are in luck. An oval tub, then I wouldn't even try it. American Standard makes a tile bead kit which created a "drip edge" to the tub. You remove the backing, firmly place it into place and seal the front edge with silicone. This will enable you to install walls around it. You could build out your walls as you suggested as an alternative, but instead of angling the wall, I would build them out straight, box the entire area at a convenient height as a shelf, with the top of the framing having just a very slight pitch as 1/4" per foot is all that is needed. Install your cement board all around it, letting the cement board overlap the drip edge installed on the tub and then instead of a moisture retarder behind the backer, thissituation, I would tape and thinset all the seams, then coat the entire area with a topical waterproofing membrane such as Redguard waterproofing membrane so that there is no chance of water getting into the cmentbaord and into your framing since you have so many changes in plane going on with this type of install that a moisture retarder behind the backer becomes useless. Line the top of the buildout with marble or granite or bullnose tile that matches the tile you planned to use. IF you use marble or granite, on the back and front edges where water will want to run off since the buildout will prevent a shower curtain from being continuous, you can cut traingular blocks or stone to act as dams to redirect the water into the tub. You can purchase these premade in plastic with double stick tape on them, but the stone if you use it to line the ledge will look much classier. Good luck. I'd also waterproof the exposed decking along the front side of the tub with Redguard or whatever other tile waterproofing membrane you choose to use as water sitting on the deck will wick through the grout and cement board and into your framing. Cement boards are not water proof, that is a very common misperception, they are just unaffected by water as they let it PASS through.
 
  #3  
Old 04-08-05, 10:48 AM
DonMon
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Ohhh, Thank you!!..Now we"re getting somewhere..Yes.. it's a rectangle thank God...My original intention was to build (up) the deck to taper in flush with the top of the tub...but your suggestion..if I understand correctly..is to go ahead and build up a higher, sort of shelf wall framed around to to butt against the tub edge itself and then 1/2" Hardibacker on it, to allow it to step in even further to cover over the gap..I'm guessing you can tile over Redguard coating just fine...Building this higher shelf wall would allow me to cut inside verticle face tiles rather than having 1/8th to 1/4" caulk gap using those outside corner tiles to lip down on top of the fiberglass tub itself..Now, this Amer.Stand. bead kit..does it go under the tub lip on the deck..or on top of the tub and wall..sounds like on top..an (L) shape to seal the top of the tub and verticle wall.?.Now,this tub seems to be made of thin gauge fiberglass and the top edges will bend down if you put any weight on it, I think it should be rock solid and not flex at all..you think I should load construction adhesive under the lip and between the tub edge and framing before I cover with Hardibacker?...You see, the top of the fiberglass tub is 5 or 6 inches wide in most areas and I would never want it to flex down if I bear weight on it..That would open a water tight seal,Thanks for your good response, If you could address these final questions and concerns, I'll feel confident enough to dive into this custom ( perfect fix)..Thanks sincerely..Don
 
  #4  
Old 04-09-05, 04:11 AM
T
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The tile bead kit goes arount the top edge of the tub where the ledge curves back sown towards the deck making what would essentially be a drip edge like youwould see on non drop in type tubs. You seal between the edge of the tile bead and the tub with siliconem then make your wall framing. You do not use construction adhesive. The build out for the wall/shelf should not rest on the tub and the framing should be built out so that the backer you install on the verticle face of the buildout overlaps the drip edge you've installed but does not rest on it or creat a stress on the drip edge. You may need some cerative notching on your framing to do this, but not hard at all. When you mention flex in the tub deck, It is normal to see a bit of flex in the tub lip but you are in a poition to eliminate it which would make for a much better installation. The bottom should be fully set in a bed of mortar (You've heard that before) such that teh tub lip does not flex when you are in the tub. Once the bottom is solid like that, then if there are any spots where you can flex the tub lip by pushing it against the deck, you can use shims to support the tub edge since you are not going to have a tub deck anymore since you are building out a shelf wall. Plastic toilet shims slid between the tub edge and the existing decking will work well for this. Tile sticks great to Redguard and other waterproofing membranes designed specificly for tile installations. Come back with any other questions you may have. Now in place of other types of protruding shelves or soap dishes, you can also use niches instead. In this linked thread, I discussed withthe poster about the height of the niche and provided a link to another thread where I discusssed the construction of niches. Maybe this will give you some other design ideas. http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=197186
 
 

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