Retiling after removal of tile


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Old 06-15-05, 12:47 PM
gmilton
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Retiling after removal of tile

I am remodeling an old bathroom - the walls (not "wet" ones behind tub or show) had old metal tile on them which I removed, leaving about a 1/16-1/8" of old adhered adhesive on the plaster and lath walls (where the adhesive failed or was loose, I removed it with a scraper.) My intention is to level out this surface with patching compound and retile over it (i.e., without tearing down the plaster wall, which is sound.) Does this seem feasible or asking for trouble? Thanks in advance for the feedback.
 
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Old 06-15-05, 05:44 PM
T
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If the walls are out of plane, it would be just plain quicker to take down the plaster, furr out the walls to 1/2" of the finished surface and install 1/2" sheetrock, then tile over that, including the seam between the two sections so you don't have to do any finishingwork. If you are set on trying to get the walls plane by skim coating, use something like durabond, which is a heavy setting type joint compound from a bag mixed with water. Unlike regular joint compound, it cures like mortar or plaster, not dries out like stuff from a bucket making it better for use behind tiles in dry areas where wall patching is required.
 
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Old 06-15-05, 07:20 PM
gmilton
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Thanks so much for your reply. I have been trying to avoid taking down the wall (never having done so and being a little nervous about the mess and getting it back together) but have realized from the beginning that is the recommended route. The skim coat approach strikes me as a little tricky since I have to get an area of several sq. ft where the old adhesive is entirely gone plane with sections where it is still largely intact. Do you think the durabond approach is really worth a try?
 
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Old 06-17-05, 10:08 PM
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Learn from my mistake

Long story short, I was in the same place you are three years ago with my kitchen. I tried to cover the mess up. It never looked right and I ended up using a Random non repeating wallpaper to try to cover it up the whole problem in the end.

Most people can't see the waves in the wall until I tell them to look for it but I see everyone. Skim coating doesn't work. I wish I would have removed the "GOOD WALL" and done it right the first time.

Also the whole skim coating process took me over two weeks with drytimes and sanding. It still looks like p**py but I am stuck with it now.

Rip off the plaster put up Sheetrock and you will be much happier.
 
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Old 06-18-05, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by gmilton
Do you think the durabond approach is really worth a try?
If you want to torture your self and find that the value of the hours and days it takes you is not worth the price of sheetrock at $6/sheet, then absolutely. I'd still use the durabond for taping and finishing the joints. It's much better in areas of high humidity and in my opinion, flows better. It's a setting type compound in a bag, usually next to the buckets of premixed and because it sets, you can get your second coat up the first day in a small area like a bathroom. Where your walls come to a corner, get some straight flex tape. It's much heavier and will not rip when you run your taping knife over it. It pretty much ensures nice crisp corners. Not cheap, but worth every penny.
 
 

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