Bathtub refinishing


  #1  
Old 08-11-05, 09:30 AM
michlyne
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Bathtub refinishing

I would like to re-finish my bathtub. I have found several different products to do this, but don't know which would be the best to use. Some of these products need up to five days to cure, and some just 24 to 48 hours. I need to use one that has the shortest drying time. Do you have any suggestions?
Thank you,
Michelle
 
  #2  
Old 08-11-05, 10:11 AM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,813
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
michlyne, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
You are not likely to be happy with your project. There have been many Members that have attemped this and all have been dissatisfied with the results. The usual problem starts at the drain. Peeling usually occurs very rapidly. If you decide to go with the project, please reply back with YOUR results. Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 08-11-05, 10:32 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 278
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
In the rental unit I just bought, the previous owner used a product sold at Lowe's that has held up surprisingly well for about a year. This is especially surprising considering most of the work this woman did was not very thorough. I remember it was a 2 step process where you had to mix paint and epoxy and store it in the freezer overnight between coats. There are professional companies that will resurface a tub for about $250, and I heard they look like new.
 
  #4  
Old 08-11-05, 10:33 AM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
michlyne,

One of our members had posted this and you should think twice about trying a DIY product. Majakdragon is telling it like it is when done poorly.

Here’s a short story about do-it-yourself reglazing. Think about this process before doing it.

“Once before I attempted to refinish a bathtub. I bought an extremely good "epoxy" paint (2 parts, had to mix before applying). I cleaned the tub by the instructions, roughed up the surface and then used a "tack cloth (sticky cloth)" to get rid of any dust particles prior to applying the paint. I then applied the paint (brush) and let is sit for 5 days prior to using it.
I will tell you that the job looked nice. Other than a few brush marks, and the fact that it had no shine, I was satisfied, and it sure looked better than the original tub. All was fine and dandy until my daughter was born. As a baby, we would bath her in the tub with one of these special devices which held to the bottom of the tub with "suction cups". Needless to say, the suction cups pulled all my hard work off the original tub surface.

One process which has been proven to work, but not available as a DIY, is known as "perma-ceram". It is a process where a professional comes in and applies a ceramic coating to the tub, and can also do the walls (but you loose the extra coloring of the grout when it is done). I have known it to be quite successful when done properly by a reputable dealer, and gives years of satisfaction.”

Carefully consider the options of reglazing, by a professional or replacing with a new product. Budget is always a concern but think long term and resale.

Hope this helps!
 
  #5  
Old 08-11-05, 11:54 AM
michlyne
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
bathtub refinish

Thank you for your advice. The tub really doesn't look that bad. I just can never seem to get it really clean. I am not sure if it is from soap scum (I have tried everything) or if the finish is worn off. My house is 55 years old. Do you know of a cleaning product that I could try other than the soap scum cleaners at the stores?
Thanks again,
Michelle
 
  #6  
Old 08-11-05, 04:56 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 278
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I didn't mean to imply that job next door looks great--I was just surprised it held up as well as it did for 10 months. Probably not a good idea.

I am not sure if it is from soap scum (I have tried everything) or if the finish is worn off.
In my tub, I have the same deal. I can get it pretty white if I scrub real hard w/ Comet, etc..., but it's dull and seems to be porous (get's dirty fast). I was wondering about carefully buffing it with a buffing bonnet on my rotary sander with some type of light rubbing compound--sort of like how you can buff a new shine to an old, weathered car. Has anyone tried this?

Mine is cast iron, probably weighs a million pounds, and is bigger than the door, so it's not going anywhere.
 
  #7  
Old 08-11-05, 05:54 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Timinindy,

Here's a couple of things I wrote awhile back;

Tub Removal

Determine first whether the tub is cast iron or pressed steel. If it's cast, you could break it up with a sledge hammer for removal. So, for cast iron tub removal, first cover the tub with an old tarp before you start. Remove anything in your way, including toilet, if necessary. If toilet is to remain, cover this up as well as the vanity, mirror, toilet. Least but not least, if there is a window within the bathroom, protect this as well. Wear protective clothes to include long sleeve shirt, goggles, hat and leather gloves. A mask would also be a good idea. The porcelain will chip off and this can cut the skin very easily. A cast iron tub can be broken up with a maul/sledgehammer 5 to 10 lb. for removal. If you are wondering cast iron tubs are very heavy from 200-400 lbs so breaking it up is the best option.

If it is pressed steel, it will have to be removed in one pc or by the use of a sawzall, it can be cut with a metal blade. This takes time but it can be done.

Best option though is one pc removal.

Most tubs are actually anchored directly to the wall studs with screws or nails. The problem with removal is that no matter which way you twist it (up or side to side) the area that the tub occupies will become longer than the five foot opening. This is assuming that you have one finished side (what you see outside the tub). When you tilt the tub up on one end (say the right end is being lifted) the top left will hit the wall and the bottom right will hit the wall. With the wall covering removed down to the studs, you may be able to lift the tub and move it out of the room on end. You will have to slide it clear of the plumbing before you lift it. An easier option, if dueable, is through the wall of an adjacent room by sliding the tub out from one end.

The trick to removing tubs is to first remove the tile and sheetrock behind it (5 foot wall to top of tile) and above both ends of the tub up to tile line and in front of both ends for 4 inches or more up to next stud. Unscrew drain assembly with a cross-shaped drain removal tool. Unscrew overflow cover plate and pull out any cover and connected drain plug and rods. The top of the tub is usually nailed to 2 or more studs along the back 60 inch side.

Slide out the tub toward the door at least 4 inches. Now it is clear of the studs and can be raised at the shallow end (not at the water valve end) to vertical with two strong people. Steel tubs may weigh 60-100 pounds.

Cleaning:

The care of either cast iron units or the alternatives is important. Never use cleansers that contain abrasives, as these can scratch both cast iron and plastic fixtures. If you simply make a practice of cleaning the tub or shower area every two weeks, you will avoid the heavy soap buildup that often necessitates heavy scrubbing. Virtually every manufacturer has a recommended cleaner that they strongly suggest you use. Follow these instructions and you will have a beautiful tub and shower area for many years.

Finally, if you do select one of the acrylic or fiberglass, you can keep it looking new by applying once a month, car wax. It just takes a few minutes and you use spray on car wax applied to the surface to the wall surfaces only. Never apply wax to the floor of the unit. Buff this wax out and it will be as shiny as new!

Hope this helps!
 
  #8  
Old 08-13-05, 10:48 PM
Boxarocks
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
DIY reglaze is perfect years later

I am very satisfied with my refinished tub.
I have removed & installed several tubs over the years, & know the amount of work involved.
I hate any thing other than cast iron, but replacing one on the second floor is always a bear.
I had never seen a reglaze job that held up & thought that I could do better than the pros work that I had seen.
I did the job 6 or 7 years ago & it has not deteriorated one iota.
The facts:
The tub is cast iron from the 50's
I removed the drain & overflow escutions, & ground with die grinder those areas to remove sheen.
I used a 9" disk grinder (& several 150grit disks) to thoroughly remove sheen on 100% of the tub.
I then etched using muriatic acid (but do not know for sure if this did much)
I Blew down, tack clothed, & then brushed on the epoxy paint.
I added sand to a few ounces of the epoxy, mixed it up & brushed it onto the bottom of the tub.
Next day, the shine was blinding, & without brushmarks
We just sold the house & after being checked by two home inspectors, no negative comments regarding the tub were made.


some caveats:
The epoxy vapors were damn near lethal.
I put too much sand on the bottom, & got complaints from the wife.
In critical areas I ground totally through the original glaze to promote adhesion.
Like all paint jobs, the prep is critical.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: