window above tub/shower


  #1  
Old 02-05-06, 04:24 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
window above tub/shower

I am trying to redo an old bathroom in a 1950s bedford stone home. It is a very small bathroom and has a window above the tub. I would like to install a shower with the tub but am worried about the window that is already there. It is a wood framed window but the window itself is not, it resembles vinyl but not sure. Can I tile around the window and be safe from rotting? There is also a screen on the inside of the window. If anyone has any ideas on what I could do to keep the window or to install some privacy ( faces the neighbors ) please let me know. I need all of the help that I can get. Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 02-05-06, 06:03 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Depending on the size of the window, you could remove it, reframe it and install glass blocks, provided you have a method of ventilation in the bathroom. If the window is the only ventilation, you will have to leave it to open. Not being able to see the window, it is sort of difficult to tell you what your options are. Is there anyway you can post a picture of the window?
 
  #3  
Old 02-05-06, 07:27 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
amkoehler,

Glass block is one idea as Chandler mentioned, look at these,

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/gallery/229281

The other is a high placed vinyl transom, you can place tile up to ceiling within the tub/shower area, as you see with glasss blocks. You can have a clean look inside or install as a regular window - use marble for a sill - this eliminates any worries about mold issues.

I hope you have an exhaust fan in the bathroom - it is required by Code regardless of a vented window or not.

Hope this helps!
 

Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 02-06-06 at 10:26 AM. Reason: Spelling
  #4  
Old 02-06-06, 04:56 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
I'm sure the code didn't call for a fan in 1950, like mine didn't in 1978, but for the life of me, I can't understand why a builder, architect, etc. would design any bathroom, regardless of whether it had a window or not, without an exhaust fan!!! I mean, for you poor souls in the extreme north, who would want to open an window with the outside temp at -13? I would retrofit, regardless.
 
  #5  
Old 02-06-06, 09:31 AM
M
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 135
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Also, any glazing in a shower or tub enclosure wall that is less than 60" above any walking or standing surface must be safety glazed.

Glass blocks would meet the safety glazing requirement but as mentioned, if the bath has no exhaust fan, would have to be an openable window.

Code (IRC 2003) does not require an exhaust fan in a bath when there is an openable window. (R303.3)
 
  #6  
Old 02-06-06, 10:18 AM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
manhattan42,

As you referred to the IRC 2003, R303.3 you failed to continue on with more that does change the requirements for an exhaust fan.

What I stated is the requirements from the new IRC book which MANDATES that a mechanical exhaust fan must be placed within a bathroom, REGARDLESS of a window. Information that I provide is to be accurate and complete. The new Code book should be out very shortly.

What many fail to realize is that the IRC 2003, R303.3 states that;

Bathroom, water closet compartments, and other similar rooms shall be provided with aggregate glazing area in windows not less than 3 sq. ft. of which one half must be operable.

EXCEPTION: The glazed areas shall not be required where artificial light and a mechanical ventilation system are provided. The minimum ventilation rate is 50 cfm for intermittent ventilation and 20 cfm for constant ventilation. Ventilation air from the space shall be exhausted directly to the outside.

This is where many people get it wrong assuming that they donít need an exhaust fan. Many just donít meet the window requirements. Glass block with a vent and no fan would not be to Code, at least to the IRC 2003 standards.

So even if your statement is true and false at the same time, what I provided is accurate and current.

Hope this helps!
 
  #7  
Old 02-08-06, 11:54 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
No there is not a vent in the present bathroom but I am planning on installing a light with an exhaust fan in the ceiling of the bathroom. What kind of adhesive is used to install the glass blocks and how are they as far as insulation from the outside? I dont really want to freeze while showering. I was going to try tiling up to and around the window and inside the sill but I realized that the gap between the screen and the window would still catch water, so there goes that idea.
 

Last edited by amkoehler; 02-08-06 at 12:07 PM.
  #8  
Old 02-08-06, 03:18 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
amkoehler,

Take a look at this link, all the issues you asked are there to be answered.

http://www.pittsburghcorning.com/homeowners/faq1.asp

Hope this helps!
 
  #9  
Old 02-09-06, 04:24 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Do I have to have a frame around the glass blocks like windows do or can I just but them up against the walls. My walls in the bathroom are plaster, I dont know if that matters. I am wanting to do this right and not just an easy fix.
 
  #10  
Old 02-09-06, 04:43 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
amkoehler,

You would make the buck (rough window opening out of wood - I suggest W/T stock but isn't mandatory). Determine the width required depending on how you are planning on how the interior finish will be.

Sorry, I have no pictures of this but I hope this explains it well enough.

Remove existing window and then furr out the existing window opening to 2 in. wider and 2-1/2 in. taller than the dimensions of the glass block panel. Tack stop blocks on the inside of the opening to keep the frame flush to the framing. Assemble the frame, then plumb and square it and nail it into the opening with 8d casing nails, shimming as needed.

On the inside, rip two 3-ft. Long spacer boards the thickness of your tile plus 3/4 in. so the window will protrude 1/4 in. past the finished tile surface. Tack them to the sides of the window opening. Tack two 2x2s into the boards to hold the glass block panel in the proper position while you push it in from the outside.

From the outside, tap shims between the panel and the frame to hold it evenly spaced on all four sides while injecting the expanding foam. After the foam cures, cut away any excess and caulk the 1/4-in. space between the panel and the jamb on the outside of the frame with silicone caulk. Finish off the trim and siding to match the outside of the house.

When tiling around the window, keep the tile about 1/8 in. away from the glass block. The apply silicone caulk to seal the joint.

**Remember to place it based on current wall depth, cement board install and tile depth.**

Outside finishes can easily be done, focus on the inside set-up.

Set the glass block FLUSH with your finished tile or butt tile to the glass block. Use non-expanding foam on sides and top of your glass block (since you are using the vinyl frame).

Tile around window. Now I have seen this done 2 ways and others with more experience at doing this can describe better their method of install.

1. Butt tile directly to edge of the glass block - meaning the glass block must be set inside to allow the tile to do this. I prefer this over the second as it provides a clean easy to clean wipe down - no edges on the wall whatsoever.

2. Using cap tile, apply the tile directly over the glass block at the edges. This should be calculated out to ensure the best look and minimal overlapping the glass block area. This looks nice but does mean a slight bump between the glass block and tile but does look great!

Seal edges with good silicone caulk.

Hope this helps!
 

Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 02-09-06 at 06:30 PM.
  #11  
Old 02-12-06, 08:04 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 14
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'm a newbie to all this but I saw these products you can put on an existing window to make them look frosted. It won't solve the water problems but it seems easy and cheap for privacy.
 

Last edited by dmsmith2; 02-12-06 at 09:23 AM.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: