What type of paint to use over shower?


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Old 03-21-06, 10:10 AM
R
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What type of paint to use over shower?

Hello everyone. I found a bit of a problem in a house we just bought a couple months ago. As we have used the master bath, I've noticed that the paint above the shower has started to peel. This, I think, is due to the extremely hot showers that me and my spouse take on a regular basis. There is a vent in the ceiling, and it does vent the steam fairly well, but when our showers are over, I noticed that there is some moisture buildup on the ceiling above the shower.

I've peeled away the paint layers, and the plaster/concrete beneath it does not feel soft (old military housing, so most of the structure is made out of concrete and plaster).

Tonight, I plan to sand down the area with a sander and seal it with some fresh paint. My question is, what type of paint do I use that will be resistent to moisture? Do they make a special paint for showers that is waterproof?

Anything I can do to avoid having to replace the plaster in the long run is good.

Thanks for your help!!
 
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Old 03-21-06, 10:24 AM
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There are paints made specifically for kitchens and bathrooms. The higher the sheen, the more impervious to water, but nothing is waterproof. Best bet would be to head to a local paint store (not the paint department in a bigger store) and see what they have to offer. Keep in mind that every brand of paint comes in two or more grades and you only want to buy the top of the line.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 10:51 AM
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I agree. Typically a latex enamel will offer enough protection. Bath paints have extra mildewcide in them which could be helpfull. Oil base enamel protects against moisture better than latex but it does have its disadvatages - most be recoated with oil, longer drying time, increased odor, clean up with solvents, etc.

To make the ceiling look good you will probably need to skim over the edges [where it peeled] with joint compound [spackling can be used if only small areas], sand when dry to acheive a slick surface. Don't forget to prime before applying top coat of paint.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 10:59 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions. I'm a first time home owner, and I'm really trying to keep from freaking out about every little thing that goes wrong.

I'll be sure to spackle the areas where the paint came off so I can get a smooth surface.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by rudnicke
I'm a first time home owner, and I'm really trying to keep from freaking out about every little thing that goes wrong.

Ah, the joys of home ownership.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 11:17 AM
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Has anyone ever used Zinsser products? One of the paint stores I spoke to said I should just go buy a can of Zinsser primer and paint the surface. He said that it more than strong enough to withstand moisture.

I've never heard of them before today.
 
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Old 03-21-06, 12:04 PM
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Although I rarely use any zinnser products I am familiar with them - good quality. They make mostly primers but I think they also make a paint specific for baths. No matter how good the primer is you still need to use a finish paint. Primers are formulated for priming and sealing and not for wear.
 
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Old 03-27-06, 01:25 PM
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I'm in the process of doing this as well, exactly what you described. I've been stripping away as much of the old, peeling paint as possible, then skim-coating everything with joint compound, sanding, priming, and then will apply a bathroom/kitchen paint. Anyone think it's worth a few extra coats of paint for added protection? The ceiling will just be white, so it's not like I need it for color quality.
 
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Old 03-27-06, 03:40 PM
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I hate painting, so I did two coats while I was at it, hopefully this means I can get by without painting again longer. If you get good coverage, one coat is usually sufficient.
 
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Old 03-27-06, 04:51 PM
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I spend several hours at three different paint stores. IN the end, I chose to use an exterior gloss paint. Dutchboy to be precise. It had good reviews when it came to durability.
 
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Old 03-27-06, 05:13 PM
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Make sure you run the bathroom vent for a minimum of 20 minutes to exhaust humidity. Many bathroom vent/fan units are not large enough to adequately exchange the required cubic feet per minute to control humidity in bathrooms. Leaving bathroom door open while showering aids with airflow.
 
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Old 03-28-06, 07:44 PM
BSparks294
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Cool

I had the very same problem today. Used the kids bathroom, since I did some repair to the shower door in ours and the caulk was drying. The paint is peeling just as was previously mentioned. This will be the second time, but in a different place. Near the ceiling above the tile area.

I told the kids to leave the door open or run the fan as was mentioned.
We have an area where the sinks are separate from the shower and the toilet.
So the kids steam the small area up quite a bit.

Only problem I have is matching the color. The paint I have for the rest of the house is just regular (best quality) latex. Should I just try to color match a better type of paint better suited to bathrooms?

Thanks, Brad
 
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Old 03-29-06, 05:33 AM
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Originally Posted by BSparks294
. Should I just try to color match a better type of paint better suited to bathrooms?


Yes, you don't want to use flat paint where you have a shower. Use latex enamel [kitch & bath - even better] If your paint for the rest of the house came from a regular paint store they can mix that color in a different type of paint. A paint store can also match a competitors color in the base that you need. Latex enamel comes in 3 basic sheens - satin,semi-gloss and gloss. Any of these will work.
 
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Old 02-16-07, 09:35 AM
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Smile Peeling Paint In Shower

I have a book by Glenn Haege, in it he recommends after sanding the problem painted surface, wash it with a TSP and bleach in water mixture. This cleans and kills any mold and mildew from the surface. next repair any chipping with a good, none shrinking compound. Next paint one/two coats of KILZ (oil based) primer. Then two coats of a marine, oil based enamel. This will seal the painted surface (water-proof it). If a top coat other than the marine enamel is desided finish it off with Zinsser bath paint tinted to your desired color. Your done.

I had this problem and foloowed this procedure and the paint has never peeled since. Its been about 9 years.
 
 

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