stand alone range or slide in range ?


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Old 08-12-06, 11:10 AM
J
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stand alone range or slide in range ?

Our gas oven/stove has finally conked out. We have been looking for a new stove for the past several weeks, but now need to go get one. We had been looking at stand alone ranges, but we noticed today that our current range sits about three (3) inches off of the floor, with base board underneath it. Does that make it a slide in range?
Basically what is the difference between the two? We did notice that slide-in's are more expensive.

Thanks
We do not have a manual for the current range, so I can't find out anything else....
 
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Old 08-12-06, 08:47 PM
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slide in or stand alone range

It sounds like you have a drop-in range, which looks like a slide-in, except it sits on a shelf, not the floor. Does it have a flange on both sides and the back? And does the countertop run behind it? If so then it's a drop-in. It would be very easy to convert the opening to allow a free standing (stand alone) range to be installed. Just remove the existing range out the front of the opening. It's probably hard wired so shut off the breaker first. You will need to cut the opening to 30" clear to the floor and to the wall to allow a free standing range to stand there. Follow the installation manual to install an electrical plug. Good luck.
 
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Old 08-13-06, 05:44 AM
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You described it pretty well, countertop running behind, and flanges on the side. Thanks for the info.
 
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Old 08-24-06, 07:08 PM
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A new free-standing range is being delivered Saturday. I tried to dis-connect the current range today. Seems as though all of the pipe connections have cement/putty on the threads. Sprayed wd-40 and worked for an hour trying to get the pipe disconnected. A couple of times, I turned the whole pipe, all the way down thru the floor, but didn't loosen it at all. Any suggestions?

Thx
 
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Old 08-25-06, 04:15 PM
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stand alone range

I would hire a plumber to disconnect the gas stove and cap off the line, especially if you don,t know what you're doing. A gas leak is extremely dangerous. Don't blow yourself up.
 
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Old 08-30-06, 05:23 PM
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I wanted to share my experience with you, in case it helps anyone out. This opinion is coming from a 'not much experience do it yourself-er'.
Our gas range was hooked up without a flexible hose. It was more custom fitted (from copper pipe main line into steel pipe adapter into range). As mentioned in previous thread, there was a cement putty on the threads at every connection. We ended up hiring a plumber to dis-connect original range, as I tried and tried, but could not loosen the current hookups. Plumber cut main gas line, and then added a new nipple to the main line, whereupon he added flexible hose to connect with new range.
What I learned. Thank goodness for the expertise at out local Lowe's hardware store. I went in there looking for a cement solvent. Each, of three people, gave me the same response ' that whatever they sold me, would not only break free the cement, but it would also probably corrode the main copper, gas line'. Also what did I learn. If your gas range does not have a flexible hose attached, then probably your connection was custom fit for the house, not thinking towards the future replacement ranges. What else did i learn? Well, i never once thought that I should call a plumber to fix a gas line. Thanks to all who added their opinion. I also learned to not keep twisting on a connection on a gas line, as it could have serious results (I learned this through word of mouth, not actual results)
One question- I spoke with a guy who was amazed that I had copper lines carrying natural gas through my house, when he lived in New York (up state), copper lines were not allowed. He had installed gas in his house and had used steel pipes throughout. I live in N Carolina. What is the difference between the two states for having different regulations/laws? Mine were installed ~ 1994, his in the late '90's.
Thx
 
 

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