Sealing bathroom grout


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Old 11-04-06, 10:29 AM
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Unhappy Sealing bathroom grout

I have been told by a contractor that the bathroom tile, after it is rerouted needs to cure for 2 weeks after the grouting has been finished. This significantly adds onto the expense, it seems. I havenít signed anything yet.

Can someone advise me of this??

Thanks so much!!
 
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Old 11-04-06, 01:38 PM
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Cure time for grout is dependent on several variables, i.e., temperature and humidity. Recommended cure time of grout prior to sealer application tends to be dependent upon the sealer manufacturer's specific instructions. This could be 24 hours, 2-3 days, 2-3 weeks, 30 days, etc, The moisture in the grout must evaporate in order for it to cure. To rush and seal moisture in grout would likely spell disaster. If using a penetrating grout, the grout must have the capacity to absorb the sealer in order to seal the pores. If using a surface sealant, moisture would be sealed into grout and could be forced off the surface as water tries to reach the surface in the curing process. Once sealer is applied, it must be given time to dry. Just because it appears to be dry on the surface does not mean it has cured and bonded to the grout. Again, depending on manufacturer, these times will tend to vary. You can find out the brands of the products being used on your project and do some research of your own for manufacturer's recommendations for cure times.
 
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Old 11-05-06, 05:31 AM
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Most often it's 3 days, just read the bottle. Sealers are generally vapor emmisive so contrary to the above claims, moisture will not be "trapped" in the installation. Anyone who pays for a contractor to seal their grout after installation has money to burn, by the way.

Biggest concern would be the contractor's prep and choice of setting materials. Now is your project a new installation or regrouting? If regrouing, is it just dirty and you want to freshen it up or is the grout cracking and falling out? Where is the installation, tub surround, floor, walls, vanity top, etc?

Regrouting a cracking installation won't last. Grout only cracks from movement and no regrout will work unless the movement is corrected. If the grout is in great shape, just old, stained and dirty, you a grout colorant over top. www.thisoldgrout.com and www.groutdye.com.
 
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Old 11-07-06, 02:39 PM
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Exclamation Thanks! No money to burn/doing it myself

Hi,
Thanks, I don't have $$ to burn and will be touching it up myself. I have done this before. (The hard part is getting the caulking off.)
BUT I HAVE A BIGGER QUESTION!!!! (They just get bigger....)

I had some contractors come, they bid, they sounded great, and they started. They had a contract and a bid that has been signed. Now there are problems with what needs to be done. They say the first row of wall tile at the floor must come up to lay glue less vinyl...I had been told that by other professionals, but they seemed to think it didn't. The guy called and I asked if he could just put plywood down over the old floor now that the tiles need to come up. He said it needed sealed and caulked. I am a bit confused and quite a bit miffed. (Whew, can you tell?) I will be talking to them in about an hour, and would LOVE some words of wisdom, or whatever you have to tell me.

Thanks, I don't have $$ to burn and will be touching it up myself. I have done this before. (The hard part is getting the caulking off.)


What do you do when that happens?
 
 

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