pedistal sink


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Old 12-13-06, 10:31 AM
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pedistal sink

I'm installing a pedistal sink in my bathroom. The directions have two different directions for if you drill into the wall and hit a stud (attach sink with included lag bolt), or if you drill and don't hit a stud (attach with included sheet rock toggle bolts). It also does not mention bolting the base to the floor, although there appears to be a hole for a bolt that looks like it isn't just a hole to allow the pedistal to properly cure during manufacturing. So, in theory, following directions the sink could be attached with 2 toggle bolts to wall if neither hole hits a stud, some caulk at the base of the pedistal, claulk at the joint between the pedistal and the base, and caulk at the joint between the wall and the sink. Directions for pedistal sink installations in my Black & Decker DIY book has you cut open the wall and attach 2 x4s nailers between the studs for the lag bolts. The pedistal has a fairly wide base 10", so I suppose that could be why it may not need a floor bolt or lag bolts in the wall and caulk and toggle's are sufficient.

Any thoughts? Obviously toggles, if I don't hit a stud, and no floor bolt is easiest. I have a tendency to overengineer to be on the safe side, but I don't want to do unnecessary wall and floor work. Floor is newly installed tile over old 1960's concrete mesh floor if it helps. Old wall is 3/8" sheetrock. I have not drilled yet to see if I hit a stud.
 
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Old 12-13-06, 10:47 AM
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3/8" drywall is rather thin. I opened up the wall and installed a nailing ledger between the studs on my install. Then lagged the sink to this added stock. I patched the drywall and did not bolt the pedastal to the floor. attaching fixture to sheetrock sounds hacky. Just one DIYers opinion.
 
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Old 12-13-06, 02:48 PM
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The ledger is the best way to go, and after you repair the sheetrock, it won't show that much, since it is out of sight for the most part. The weight of the sink itself will keep the pedestal in place. There is no need to caulk, silicone, etc. unless you feel warm and fuzzy doing it.
 
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Old 12-13-06, 03:27 PM
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Thanks

You confirmed my suspicion. I generally believe in following manufacturer's instructions, but this one seemed too easy. I could see myself leaning on it and the whole thing tipping to the side, but I have no experience with pedastal sinks and wasn't sure if I was being overly careful by installing the nailer despite the directions. I'm not too worried about the wall matching, I just removed wall tile and am still in the process of coating and sanding to smooth it over. In retrospect it would have been easier to re-sheet rock/fiberboard the whole thing. Anyway, by the time I finish sanding/layering joint compound to get the wall smooth any patch over the nailer won't be visible.
 
 

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