Is it drywall? Can it be fixed?


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Old 01-07-07, 07:38 PM
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Question Is it drywall? Can it be fixed?

I知 tearing up my bathroom in a home build in the 70s and after I pulled the vanity and tile out I got to see what type of wall I知 dealing with. I think it is some type of drywall like board as is it fibrous and chalky like drywall but it has turned a brownish color and the paper covering it is peeling off in sections. My question is, when I read everything about tiling a bathroom they say I need to have cement backerboard for waterproofing purposes especially around the tub. I prefer not to rip it all out and start fresh. Is there anyway to repair this (in the areas that paper has torn off) and possibly waterproof the section where I will put up the tile, or am I going to have remove it all?
 
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Old 01-07-07, 09:39 PM
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Tile can be applied to sheetrock only in areas where there will be no water. Showers done with sheetrock won't last unless they're done with the Ditra system which was not around in the seventies.
 
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Old 01-08-07, 03:50 AM
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Back in the '70s it was common place to use green board [water resistant drywall] under tile for tub surrounds. It was a cheap alternative to wire lath and masonary. The advent of cement board has made it the only way to go.

Replace the drywall behind the tile with cement board - it won't cost that much and you will have a better, longer lasting tile job!
 
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Old 01-08-07, 07:57 AM
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Question

What about the drywall around the vanity? My new vanity will be smaller and there is now exposed drywall. Do you think I need to replace it as well? It is not in horrible condition other than the paper has torn off in many spots. Again, I will be trowling mud over it after I prime it (the walls don't have popcorn, only the ceiling).
 
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Old 01-08-07, 08:29 AM
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That area is normally just a backsplah and not exposed to enough water to be a huge problem. If it were my place, I'd fix the bad spots the best I could and stick the tile up. I don't like wall mastic and always use thinset, but that's your call.
 
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Old 01-08-07, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Gulp
What about the drywall around the vanity? It is not in horrible condition other than the paper has torn off in many spots. Again, I will be trowling mud over it after I prime it (the walls don't have popcorn, only the ceiling).
Be sure to prime all unfaced gypsum with a solvent based primer. The water in j/c and latex paint/primer tends to get sucked up by the raw gypsum sometimes disolving it and usually makes the surrounding paper bubble up. Using solvent based primer first, prevents this problem
 
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Old 01-08-07, 01:52 PM
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I was going to use joint compound first as primer....will that work?
 
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Old 01-08-07, 03:41 PM
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No, not if the paper face is missing off of the drywall. The moisture in the j/c often adversely affects the gysum and paper - always best to coat unfaced drywall with a solvent based primer first.
 
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Old 01-08-07, 06:04 PM
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Youll need to replace the drywall in the tub surround with cement backer board as marksr suggested. Drywall is not an option there.

Marksr has given you all the info you need on the drywall in the "non wet areas". One other comment though. Sometimes its easier and faster to put up new drywall than it is to make lots of patches and repairs to the old. Drywall and joint compound are relatively inexpensive (but not as cheap as they were just a short few years ago). But youll have to be the judge as to whether its easier to patch or replace.
 
 

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