Bathroom Remodel action plan


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Old 01-11-07, 08:46 PM
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Question Bathroom Remodel action plan

I am planning to do a large remodel of my only full bath in the house.
I am going to replace tub, replace floor with tile and tile walls around tub.
I am not sure of the order in which to do first? I am going to have to go all the way to the joists on the floor because of water damaged floor & sub floor. Do you replace only the sub floor then install the tub or someother order?
 
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Old 01-12-07, 07:01 AM
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Replace the subfloor first. You dont mention anything about a toilet or vanity, but Im assuming you know you need to remove both of those. Use blocking between the joists where the edges of the old plywood meet the new plywood so you have something to support the edges. Use 3/4" exterior bc or better grade plywood. Then do your plumbing work and install your tub. After that its cement board on the tub surround walls. Dont forget to use a vapor barrier behind the cement board. If any exterior walls with insulation, make sure you make lots of slits in the craft paper so you dont wind up with two vapor barriers. Leave 1/8" gaps in where cement board meets cement board. Tape these seams with alkali resistant tape and modified thinset at the same time you do the tile work. This avoids having to tile over high spots on the wall. Next, tile and grout the walls. Then you can move onto the floor. You may need a second layer of plywood, well talk about that. Use 1/4" cement board on the floor. It gets bedded in unmodified thinset with 1/4" notched trowel and screwed to the floor with special cement board screws. Leave 1/8" gap between cement board sheets, and tape and mud these seams as you set the tile. Square drive screws are easier to set flush with the top of the cement board.

Almost forgot the most important thing. Since youll be removing the subfloor, this will give you exposure to the joist system below. Make sure you meet deflection requirements for ceramic or stone tile (you dont say what your are using). If theres any work to be done on the structure, the time to do it will be when the floor is open.

Im sure I forget some steps along the way so if you have any questions, shoot away.
 
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Old 01-12-07, 08:13 AM
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I agree with everything previously advised except the wall to floor tiling order. I like to do the floor first and then the walls so the tile from the wall lips over the floor tile. This provides a much cleaner look and any water that may run down the wall, in the form of splashing kids or condensation, will tend to run off the wall, onto the floor, and away from the wall rather than potentially between the wall and floor. I use galvanized roofing nails rather than screws, but screws work. The only step I noticed that may have been missed is where to use caulk instead of grout. Every color grout has a corresponding color match caulk that is made to use where grout should not be. These areas are, angle changes and material changes. Where the tub or walls meet the floor, where the back wall and side walls come together, where the walls and ceiling meet, are all angle changes. The various surfaces move independent of each other and grout, not being a flexible material, will not stay in these areas. The color match caulk is flexible and made to compensate for this movement. Also, different materials have different expansion and contraction rates causing the same issues with the same remedy.
 
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Old 01-12-07, 08:46 AM
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Smokey

I leave the bottom row of tile on the walls out until Ive finished the floor, then I fill in the wall down to the floor. I use a ledger board on the walls to keep the first row of tile level and from sagging. Besides, tubs and floors are never level enough for us guys to start with a full tile. I dont like to have to cover the floor when working on the walls. Both ways will work fine. He may be better off doing it my way this time because he's gonna need a shower. My way he'll be able to take a shower in a week or so, your way maybe two weeks.

I sometimes use roofing nails as well but like the screws better. Its a head thing I think though. I havent had any failures because of nails. CBU manufacturers say either or is good.

What Smokey said about the caulk instead of grout.
 
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Old 01-12-07, 11:51 AM
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I feel better already. Good show, makes sense. I've seen installers do the floors after the walls and leave a full grout joint against the wall which, IMO, is a mistake. I should have had more confidence in you than that.
 
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Old 01-12-07, 01:07 PM
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Just trying to get his shower back to him faster by getting it done first. Its his only shower. Two weeks no shower can wear on a person.
 
 

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