Shower wall transition durarock/greenboard


  #1  
Old 01-22-07, 09:02 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Shower wall transition durarock/greenboard

Hi just to give a quick overview I have a shower that is tiled and I will be removing all and replacing it. I am forced to used durarock on the first 5ft of the shower wall and then greenboard on the next 3ft. hows does one transition from durarock to greenboard. I am thinking that a seem tape must go there and I am confused what to fill the seems with joint compund or thinset or just nothing. Then when i do fill the seems with whatever I have to use mastic and also thinset on the respected areas. I know this sounds wierd but because of the configuration I dont know of any other solution to the combo. Any helpful thoughts would be greatful

Thanks
Captain
 
  #2  
Old 01-22-07, 09:19 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Just tape it with the alki tape and thinset and run the tile above it onto the greenboard. Oh and don't use mastic for any of parts of your shower project.
 
  #3  
Old 01-22-07, 09:35 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
re John

Thanks for the info John I wasnt aware the thinset would adhere to the greenboard. I do have to use joint compound to float a cornerbead on the other side of the showerdoor and then tile some of it so I think I have to use mastic there? any other thoughts
 
  #4  
Old 01-22-07, 09:45 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Greenboard was and still is used by some tile people to set tile. I wouldn't use it and one shouldn't but they do. Get yourself a good modified thinset like versabond sold at Depot.

When you say mastic are you referring to joint compound or the premixed thinset? Like I said I wouldn't use mastic anywhere near that shower project. It takes a long time to dry and if it gets wet it turns back to mush!

if you are tiling that area just make the tile pass all the joints if you can. Even offset the tape a little so you don't have set the tile way past the joint.
 
  #5  
Old 01-22-07, 12:03 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Re John

Hey John
I was talking about joint compound to feather the corner bead its on the outside of the showerdoor but i need to finsh the corner. you advised helped me alot and solved the issue. I wished the idiots at lowes had more knowledge
about there products

Thanks
ed
 
  #6  
Old 01-22-07, 01:17 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ed, will you tile to the corner where you need to add the corner bead? If you do I would use thinset for the side with the tile and joint compound for the otherside that will get paint. I had the same issue with my basement bath. I had to build the front wall out because of plumbing. I used the paper corner protector. It comes in a roll with metal srtips attached to the paper. You bend the paper in half and tape it like reg. tape. Its not thick like the plastic or metal corner protectors. It worked out well. I got it at Depot.

Thats why sites like this are great. There are good people around here that want to help you complete your job. The right way. Goodluck.
 
  #7  
Old 01-22-07, 02:05 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ed, did you put a min of 4mil poly (plastic) between the studs and durarock? You should have it there to prevent water/moisture getting to your lumber. If not you can waterproof the durarock with something like Redgard sold at Depot.
 
  #8  
Old 01-22-07, 02:40 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,533
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Ed

You dont say why you have to use a combo of durock and greenboard. So tell us why you have to do this. Whats the unique situation that requires you to do this?
 
  #9  
Old 01-22-07, 03:55 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Answers to the questions

I hope i can remember all of them but yes i did use poly behind the rock. I am going to use Johns recomend on the corner bead but i am a little short on the inside corner but i am going to give it the ole college try. The reason is this house nothing was built right and in the 70's to boot. the shower /bathroom is in the master of a cape style house. the bathroom is about 4' x 6' and the shower is 33" x 48" on the backside of the shower the roof slopes down creating a slant to about over all hieght of 80" and the other side butts up to the e door of the bathroom very small. the outside of the shower door is even on the backside and then it has about a 2" lip on the back of the shower door the projects into the bathroom area. thats why i have to mix the 2 backerboards. I will give everyone a huge tip on the floor were the pan agraget/concrete meets the tile I have used a product called 3m 5200 this is very widley used in the marine industry. I have had used it on a cast iron tub about 10 years ago and has no mildew have never touched it and is still 100% in tact. this does dry hard and cleans with no problem i hope this helps someone.
 
  #10  
Old 01-22-07, 04:31 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,533
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Ed

I didnt really grasp your situation. Anywhere inside the shower area that will see direct water spray should get cement board. If you intend to tile all the area inside the shower, even above the shower head you should use cement board there as well. If your gonna be painting the area above the shower head then you can use greenboard or regular drywall. Greenboard is not used in my area at all anymore. It is not a suitable substrate for tile in wet areas. Greenboard performs no better than regular drywall but is more expensive.

If the joint where the drywall and cement board meet will receive tile, then use alkali resistent tape and thinset to tape that joint. Do not under any circumstances use any mastic or "premixed thinset" in the shower. No premixed grouts either. Thinset and grout should be in a powder form that needs to be mixed with water or an additive. Taping and mudding the cement board joints while you do the tile work will prevent high spots on the wall that may push the tile out so tape and mud the joints when you set the tile.

Cornerbead and other products like it tend to bow the wall out at the corner and this may show in your tile work. Use a piece of alkali resistant mesh tape on the corner, using thinset on the tiled side and drywall compound on the wallboard side. You can tile to the end of the wall (making sure you get that last row of tile perfectly plumb) and then use the tile edge as a straight edge to fill in the drywall side with drywall joint compound. This will give you a nice flat tiled corner.
 
  #11  
Old 01-22-07, 05:04 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
mr carson

thanks for the info i concur with your thoughts the shower has alot of angles so thats the reason for the greenboard. I wished i could find the corner tiles that would make life even easier yet but the tile my wife found doesnt have it. I have to say I am still baffled on silicon chalk in the inside corners. I know the reasons but it seems like a very week point in the shower even more so than the lower lip where the shower pan meets the tile. I am going with the experts on this one so we will see if she floats
 
  #12  
Old 01-23-07, 06:24 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ed, caulk the corners of the shower and at the tub where the tiles fall. Once you pick your grout, they should have matching caulk, sanded and unsanded. If you grout those corners, I'm sure they will crack on you. Its happened to me, so caulk them. Ed, if you can't find bullnose tiles in your style, add a frame border. This will break things up and add contrast to your work.

Ed I have some pics of my bath which the CBU meets the greenboard. If you want to take a look at them to see how I made the transistions, let me know. I can email them to you if you like.
 
  #13  
Old 01-25-07, 01:21 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Heressssssssssss Johnny

Hey thanks for the info it always helps know before its done. let me ask you this the grrenboard should it be bare or put a drywall primer on it prior to installing the tiles? Thanks again for all your help
Ed
 
  #14  
Old 01-25-07, 01:50 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,533
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
The thinset will bond better to unprimed, unpainted drywall.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: