Replace tiles on shower sit down...


  #1  
Old 01-22-07, 09:05 AM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Angry Replace tiles on shower sit down...

By the way, excellent forum, glad to be a member- sit down appears to be made of wood and is uneven house is 12 years old, curious what product to apply to wood sit down to attach tiles.
Thanks in advance.
 
  #2  
Old 01-22-07, 01:45 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,281
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Whats a sitdown? Where you from? I havent heard that term before.
 
  #3  
Old 01-22-07, 09:42 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,241
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Sounds like you're talking about a bench in a shower. Wood framing for those tends not to work all that well. I make them from concrete block so they'll stay together.
 
  #4  
Old 01-23-07, 06:44 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,281
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Hey Smokey - sit downs? That what they call them in your neighborhood too? I kinda figured the same but was curious about the terminology.
 
  #5  
Old 01-23-07, 09:14 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,241
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
No it isn't. It's a new term to me also, but I took a guess. Kinda like wondering what a bonnet is on a car.
 
  #6  
Old 01-23-07, 11:13 AM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys...

A bench, trying to shore it up so that the tiles dont fall off every few years.
 

Last edited by lgoldson; 01-23-07 at 01:14 PM.
  #7  
Old 01-23-07, 11:57 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,241
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
It's the wood that's causing the problem. You've got two issues. Wood and tile have dramatically different expansion and contraction rates, and tile, glued straight to wood, won't stay there, especially in a wet environment such as a shower. The grout will wick water into the wood and exaggerate the problem. Also, the different surfaces of the bench, if framed with wood, will move independent of each other causing the corners to crack which allows water to penetrate through to the wood, and so on. I used to frame them with wood, wrap them with wonder board, and then tile them. That only slowed the process. The best solution is a bench made of block or concrete.
 
  #8  
Old 01-23-07, 01:13 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks Smokey...

Sounds like a major undertaking, will kep you posted.
 
  #9  
Old 01-23-07, 01:46 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,281
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Ill agree with Smokey on the seat being built out of block as being the best way. Its the way I do it also. Some pros do frame them out of wood though and do a good job of it.

Remove the tile and any wet or moldy materials. Let everything dry out good before proceding. Make sure the framing is good and solid. Do whatever needs to be done to make sure it doesnt move (more nails, screws additional framing etc.). Cover the seat top with 3/4" plywood. If you can afford the height a second layer of ply on the top is a good idea (1/2" would be great). Put 1/2" cement board on the front of the seat. The cement board should overlap the pan liner just like a wall installation. Use 1/2" cement board over the top as well. Bed it in thinset (1/4" notched trowel) and screwed to the plywood every 6" in the field and at the edges. Use the square drive screws made for cement boards as they will be easier to set flush with the top of the cement board. Tape and mud all the joints where the seat meets the walls vertically and horizontally with alkalai resistent mesh tape and modified thinset. Tape and mud the front joint on the seat where the front and top cement board meet with alkalai resitant tape and modified thinset. Then use two or three heavy coats of redgard (a paint on waterproofing membrane) to cover the entire seat front and top. Extend the redgard 6" to 8" onto the walls around the entire seat. Then replace your tile with a modified thinset.
 
  #10  
Old 01-23-07, 03:33 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,241
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Although I don't like using wood in this application, if that's the route you're going to take, HeresJohnny is correct and this will have the best chance of success. I would, however, make one more suggestion. Redgard is a fairly thick substance, kind of like the Elmer's in a jar we all used to past things in grade school. I've had problems in the past with it not bonding well to the concrete board. It dries feeling sort of like a plastic coating and can be peeled off much too easily than I care for, so I use an additional step. I'll dilute a small amount of it with water so it is more like a paint primer in consistency and then paint it onto the surface I'm waterproofing. This coat is watery enough to soak into the concrete board and get a good bond to it. Then I put the rest on as the directions say to do. The full strength adheres well to the diluted coat which is bonded well with the concrete board. The stuff is great and will do a good job for you, I just like this extra step for my own peace of mind's sake.
 
  #11  
Old 01-23-07, 03:38 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,281
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Smokey - Ive heard about the diluting trick. Sounds like a good idea. I actually moisten the board before I apply the first coat for the exact same reason.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: