shower stall update w/questions

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Old 02-08-07, 06:26 PM
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shower stall update w/questions

Ok, so I have removed the walls of my shower stall and discovered that they used 1/2 inch drywall behind the plastic sheeting that made up the shower walls. Now I am replacing this with a pre-fab stall which has the individual walls, corners and base. So it is right that there should be waterproof drywall not regular drywall installed before the shower walls are put in? And would that include the ceiling of the shower? Then can I just paint the wall area between the tops of the stall walls and the ceiling?

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Old 02-08-07, 08:59 PM
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Shower Stall Update

Hi Dave, Yes, I would install dry wall first before installing the shower stall. You will have a more true surface to work with and no soft spots between the 2x4" studs. If the 2x4" studs are not in perfect alinement, you might have uneven areas when installing shower walls without dry wall. I use what they call 'green board', it's green dry wall and coated to be used in bath areas.

It can be painted and I always use semi-gloss enamel, water base or oil base.
Run caulking on the top edge of your shower panels and smooth it out with
your 'wet' finger.

Read the tube of caulking to be sure it's paintable, some are not.

Hope I was of some help,
Earl [email protected]
 
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Old 02-09-07, 06:28 AM
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Another viewpoint. If you are installing the panels with the corners, you will invariably have an avenue for water infiltration, since it is not a one piece unit. I would install a vapor barrier, then 1/2" cbu (durock, hardie) instead of the sheetrock. Greenboard is not approved for wet locations any longer, as it does not give that much more protection than regular sheetrock.
 
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Old 02-09-07, 06:50 PM
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Ok so do I run the durock/hardie the same height as the shower walls and sheetrock from there up to the ceiling? Or do I just run it all the way up to the ceiling? I will be painting the wall and ceiling that is not covered by the shower walls.

Thanks,
 
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Old 02-09-07, 07:09 PM
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It wouldn't hurt if you do the ceiling above the shower if that is the specific question. You have to remember that above this shower ceiling, you are going to have insulation. If the ceiling is in good shape, leave it.
 
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Old 02-09-07, 07:42 PM
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Well that is part of my question. Basically I will be taking the 3 walls and ceiling that make up the shower down to the studs, so I am asking do I put Durock on all the walls and the ceiling? The fiberglass walls of the shower do not extend up to the ceiling, so some of the wall covering and the ceiling will be painted. If those parts are durock, can I paint it?

I am trying to do my best to explain, let me know if im not being clear.

Thanks,
 
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Old 02-10-07, 04:50 AM
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I would only run the cbu up to the height of your finished wall (tile), and leave the sheetrock above and on the ceiling. CBU does not finish well.
 
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Old 02-10-07, 07:56 AM
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Ok, thats what I wanted to know, I should be good for now but I will ask more questions as needed.

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-10-07, 11:36 PM
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question

Can someone tell me the best method of cutting durock/hardie? Does it cut like sheetrock or do I need any special tools to cut it?

Thanks,
 
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Old 02-11-07, 04:30 AM
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Dave: for the few pieces you will be cutting, go outside, away from things you don't want dusty, don a good dust mask and eye protection, and using a circular saw blade you don't mind throwing away, cut it with the saw. Now for the holes in the sheets where your control valves go, a diamond tipped hole saw is in order, but they are a little pricey. You can cut the durock and hardie using a scoring knife and snap it like sheetrock, but I find the saw much quicker, and it leaves a much better edge.
 
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Old 02-11-07, 09:45 AM
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You can get a carbide tipped scoring tool made to do concrete board that works. Score and snap it like sheet rock. Having said that, I have to say, I quit doing that ages ago. I do the same thing Chandler suggested only I use my side grinder and diamond dry cut blade because it doesn't wear out, does a good job, and I've always got it on the job. I like the cleaner edges I get with this method, but it is really dusty and you don't want to breath the dust. This is how I do concrete board. I don't use hardi but it's a layered product so I'm not sure it "snaps" any how.
 
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