Shower exhaust fan/light combo

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  #1  
Old 04-07-07, 03:14 PM
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Shower exhaust fan/light combo

In planning ahead of myself, I would like to put a fan/light combo unit in an existing shower stall that only has a ceiling light now. A few details -

My full tear-off flat roof is being done next week. I figure this would be an ideal time to have this much needed exhaust installed in this stall that will be reworked later to accomodate it on the ceiling. It's not used at this time because of the deficient venting - the standard vent fan for the bathroom itself doesn't cut it.

This fully tiled stall has ventilation issues, which is why it's not used yet, and it's design makes me think that an in-stall exhaust is the best approach. The thing is, it might be months before it gets the attention needed.

Knowing the inside general location of the combo unit, can the exhaust stack be put in without problems and then the stall ceiling be worked around that in a reasonable fashion?

Are these combo units 'wet-rated' as long as they are on a GFCI protected circuit? Any problems/considerations to be made prior to the stack being installed without the unit in the ceiling yet?
 
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Old 04-07-07, 04:03 PM
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There is really no need for the fan to be in the shower. It will work just as well anywhere on the ceiling. Most people don't realize that the exhaust fan can't move too much air with the bathroom door closed. The fan is trying to push air out and it has to be replaced by air from outside the bathroom. You just can't squeeze too much air in under the door! That is why I always put a timer on the switch for the exhaust fan. You can set it to run after you leave the room and not worry about getting back to turn it off. Be sure to use a fan matched to the room size or, perhaps if you take exceedingly steamy baths, one that is rated for a larger room.
 
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Old 04-07-07, 07:35 PM
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This stall is a bit tall with at least 2 feet above the top of the hinged shower door which only has about a 3 inch air gap on top. Clearing that top cavity of humidity in the stall seemed like a problem to me - even with the shower door open.

Am I just being overly concerned?
 
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Old 04-07-07, 07:55 PM
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The water vapor tends to gather at the ceiling so why not place the fan in the vicinty of but not directly in the shower?
 
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Old 04-08-07, 03:16 AM
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The existing exhaust is about 6 feet from the shower stall door. The 2 foot partition from the ceiling to the top of the shower door is what I was concerned about, thinking it might be to much to pull the moisture around from up that high. The stall is fully enclosed on all sides.

I thought it(exhaust outside of the stall) would pull the more accessible room air out before it moved the wet air trapped in that 2 foot "cavity" at the top of the stall. There was signs of mildew or mold on the ceiling from the P.O. when I moved in but who knows if they ran the fan when needed?

I would prefer not to have yet another penetration in the roof but with the full tear-off, I figure it would be the right time to consider it, if needed.
 
 

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