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Big mess repair, greenboard, tile, etc..***pics***

Big mess repair, greenboard, tile, etc..***pics***


  #1  
Old 08-03-07, 09:19 PM
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Big mess repair, greenboard, tile, etc..***pics***

First time user to this site. Not sure how pics work, but here it goes.







http://uploader.ws/upload/200708/bathroom_001.jpg
http://uploader.ws/upload/200708/bathroom_002.jpg
http://uploader.ws/upload/200708/bathroom_003.jpg
http://uploader.ws/upload/200708/bathroom_004.jpg
http://uploader.ws/upload/200708/bathroom_005.jpg







Recently had a couple leaks in the plumbing behind the shower. Tile had to be removed, new copper pipes. Blower, dehumidifier, the works. Now I am left with this mess. One of the quotes I got was almost $400 to repair this hole and some drywall.

The problem is that there is this huge hole here and nothing to hold up plaster, drywall or anything. I am contemplating using wood slats to create a backing. Here is what I'm thinking.

1. Remove tile on either side of the holes.
2. Use wood slats behind existing cement to create a backing.
3. Mesh/tape between any spaces between slats.
4. Cement to create a level area.
5. Then need to use something to adhere the tiles.. thinset?

This is looking like a huge project. Any help would be appreciated.. Thanks
 
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Old 08-04-07, 06:53 AM
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From the pictures I could get to work, (the middle group BTW), if I were doing it, I'd take out that whole wall. Those are pretty standard tiles and should be replaceable, but sizes and dye lots are sometimes hard to match. If you replace the whole wall, the repair will be a lot simpler and, if things don't quite match, the break will be in the corner and not as noticeable.
 
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Old 08-04-07, 09:57 AM
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I'm not too worried about the matching or whatnot. I just want this patched up and ready for business.

The trickiest thing is the fact that this is a huge gaping hole and how am i suppose to fill it.
 
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Old 08-04-07, 12:06 PM
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Open up the wall laterally to the middle of the next studs, taking out tile beyond that point. Clean the area up, replace the cbu, reinstall the tile with thinset and grout. What is the pvc pipe for?
 
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Old 08-04-07, 03:56 PM
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I have no idea what the pvc is there for, didn't pay attention to that. Seems as though there wasn't any drywall/greenboard used before. There is a mesh, some concrete, then another layer of mesh. Its not going to be easy to make a clean line to put in more green board.
 
  #6  
Old 08-04-07, 05:50 PM
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No green board. The tile was adhered to a concrete backer board, either Durrock or Wonderboard. The stuff is constructed with a fiberglass mesh on both outer surfaces and concrete between. Feel around in there and see if they used a moisture barrier. It'll be a layer of plastic. If not, it isn't the end of the world, you'll just want to make sure you waterproof the new backer board before you tile to it. If you can get the tile off without tearing up the concrete board, cut the tile and backer board out as close to the next studs as you can get, minus a tile. Cut through the center of the last tile before the studs and then remove the rest of that last tile so you're left with half a tile's worth of concrete board exposed. This may be easier said than done if the tile is well adhered. Build framing that allows the existing backer board and the new to be well secured with screws. Since the only purpose of this framing is to secure the two edges, it can be done the same way you'd do a drywall patch, Screw the boards to the existing backer board and then screw the new to the same boards. Pack some silicone caulk into the seam between the two to seal it, then Redgard the entire concrete board surface, old and new. I add a step to the Redgard instructions. The stuff is pretty viscous and tends to not get a good bond to the concrete board, so I'll dilute some 50/50 with water and paint it on. This thinner version will soak into the concrete board and provide a surface the rest can bond well to. Let the first coat dry good and then apply the second per instructions on the container. When it drys, it will be bright red and feel like a plastic coating. Adhere your new tile with thinset, allow to set a day, and grout. You'll need to seal the grout after it has cured sufficiently. The purpose for cutting through the last tile and then removing the remainder is so the new tile overlaps the seam in the concrete board to provide additional strength to the job.
 
 

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