DIY Shower Pan?

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-06-07, 01:27 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
DIY Shower Pan?

I'm replacing the separate shower and tub in my master bath (second story). In the 9'x3' space I want to put a large shower (6'x3') open on the short end and a small drying area (3'x3').

I've been looking at options for long shower pans and have come across Tile-Redi, Tile-Basin(KBRS inc.) and the Kerdi system.

Has anyone used any of these and can make a recommendation for a handy but novice diyer?

Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-07-07, 10:50 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Words alone cannot describe how good a Kerdi shower will be. No better option for doing just what you propose. The membrane will allow you to completly customize the size and shape of your shower. Using regular drywall on all your walls is much easier than cement board and your entire enclosure is waterproof under the tile as opposed to behind the walls.

So what are the exact plans? dual drains perhaps, one in the shower and one in the drying area? Curbless with just "speed bumps at the entry to the shower and at the front of the drying off area? Ditra on the floor of the bathroom and Kerdiband flashed up the walls would make everything water tight too.

Schluter now has an offset drain pan that fits into where an old tub would have gone. Might be an option for your preslope that would make for minimal work relocating your drain. Build up the difference in size (it's 32x60) around the perimeter with drypack (4parts sand/1 part portland) to fill in and slope to the perimeter. The Kerdi will work over the juncture of the two materials as an anti fracture membrane. Otherwise, you will need a lot of mud. That tray could save you tons of time. Just a suggestion. One online option is www.tile-experts.com

Another option would be Nobleseal TS from Noble company. You'd do basicly the same as with the Kerdi, but you would use their special drain flashing collar with a standard clamping ring tile shower drain. They, like Schluter, have drains with square grates as well. They have a preformed preslope pan and they also sell an extension piece for it.
www.noblecompany.com
 
  #3  
Old 12-07-07, 12:35 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thank you for the info. Kerdi certainly seems to be a good choice.

Do you have any experience with shower benches with the Kerdi system? Can I build it external to the prelsope pan and just cover it in the same membrane? If I build a 14" bench on one end then the 32x60 pre slope with center drain will work great. I just haven't seen anyone do this.

I didn't realize I could use regular wallboard behind the membrane. Worries me a little, as I just ripped out some very wet wall board in this shower....but obviously no kerdi membrane there.

Last question, how easy is Kerdi system for an amature? I'm handy and love doing things myself, but this would be my first tile work.
 
  #4  
Old 12-07-07, 02:10 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Do you have any experience with shower benches with the Kerdi system?
Yes

Can I build it external to the prelsope pan and just cover it in the same membrane?
Yes, Build it out of 2x's, cover it with plywood, make sure it's sloped, cover it with sheetrock on the seat and sheetrock on the front, then thinset your Kerdi

You could (and this is what I do) go full length on the pan, giving the extention portion about 1/8" slope per foot so the overall appearance will remain the same and use a "betterbench" by innovis. It preserves the entire footprint of the shower giving it a larger appearance and it's fool proof. You can install it as you set your courses of tile so that it aligns with your running grout lines.

www.innoviscorp.com



Kerdi is very user friendly. Use it over regular sheetrock with no worries. Don't use greenboard, just regular sheetrock. You can use cement board like durock or wonder or permabase but it is a bit harder to cover with Kerdi. Forget the thought of Hardi. Hardi is very thirsty and sucks the moisture out of your thinset quicker than you can get the Kerdi installed on it.

The only thing with Kerdi are the special requirements for thinset. To make your life easy, spend as much time as possible ensuring all your framing is plumb and square. Sister, shim, plane, whatever, which is a good practice no matter what method of shower construction you use. Frame it large enough to sheetrock down to the bottom plate, then install your pan-or-install blocking between the studs so that you can fasten the bottom of the sheetrock. Kerdi is both water and vapor proof. As such, it becomes the vapor barrier. Any insulated walls behind the installation must have unfaced insulation batts, or use a utility knife and make several slits through the insulation's facing to nullify the vapor barrier effects of the facing. Do not use any pressure treated lumber in your framing installation, use only kiln dried framing lumber, 16" oc.

When constructing niches in showers with traditional methods, I coat the niches with trowel able tile membranes. With Kerdi, it's much easier to use a preformed niche, run the Kerdi over the front of the niche and seal the intersection with "Kerdifix" sealant. You didn't ask, but I figured I'd through it out there.

Please bookmark this thread. Post every question you have relating to this project in this thread, whether you think it applies or not. This will enable us all to follow your project from start to finish, without the backtracking for additional info that's so common when some folks start 5 or 6 threads on the same project.

Good luck.

Where are you located and have you picked out a tile yet?
 
  #5  
Old 12-07-07, 02:31 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks so much for the great info...you're giving me more and more confidence to jump in and just do it.

I live in san diego, and no, we haven't selected the tile yet. We're thinking of something small for the flooring, maybe 2x2 hex/dot pattern and then 6x6 or subway tiles for the walls. Also in the plan is an accent band somewhere up the wall, mayb3 60" up, and a change in pattern or tile size above that. The color will be something neutral, earth tones, with may be some color accents.

Any advice for tile selection?

Once my demo is complete, I'll start posting pics.
 
  #6  
Old 12-07-07, 03:16 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My only advice for tile selection would be not to mix different tile thicknesses on your first tile project. Actually, if you fine a decorative tile that's thinner, building it up behind is pretty easy, but the reverse it a bit harder. Glass tile is also pretty tricky for a first project. Other than that, you can use pretty much anything you want. Stone will be high maintenance. Any porcelain or clay bisque ceramic will be fine and perform equally.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: