Quarter Round

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Old 05-31-08, 06:28 AM
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Quarter Round

How do cut inside quarter round where the ceiling meets the wall inside corner?

Thank you,
 
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Old 05-31-08, 06:52 AM
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If your trim piece is concave, it is cove. It it's convex, it is quarter round. The pieces may not fit perfectly at a 3 way intersection, but you can get them close. You can try it 2 different ways. Practice making a mockup of each to see which you can get to look the best.

First method would involve putting up the ceiling pieces first. Miter them to meet in the corner. Then on the piece that runs up the corner, miter half of each side of it so that it has a point on the end like an arrow. Then you'll need to cope and file the back side until it will overlap the miter about halfway.

Second method would be similar, but would use miters instead of copes. The ceiling pieces would meet at a miter, but then you'd need to cut a 45 on the bottom half of the left and right pieces. Again, on the piece that runs up the corner, you would miter half of each side of it so that it has a point on the end like an arrow. All these miters would butt together to form your corner.

It might help to imagine this intersection as a simple 90 degree corner... it's just split 3 different ways. And knowing that the point of the vertical corner piece miter will end in the MIDDLE of the other miter will help you visualize how it is supposed to look.

Welcome to the forums, BTW.
 
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Old 05-31-08, 12:10 PM
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After rereading my reply, it sounded as clear as mud. So I made a couple mock-ups, maybe seeing the pictures will help you see what to do. So forget what I said about coping (needlessly complicated) All 3 pieces will be cut the same, with a point on the end, kind of like an arrow.







 
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Old 09-25-08, 10:58 AM
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More Info Please

Xsleeper! This is a great post. Just what I was looking for. However can you provide a bit more detail on how you cut these "arrows" on quarter round? I've tried and tried and managed to get one done, but can't figure out how I really did it or how to do it again.

I have a mitre saw, however it will only slant vertically in one direction, and thay may be confusing me.

Thanks,
Rob

P.S. Pictures of your mitre saw as you make each cut would really help.
 
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Old 09-25-08, 05:53 PM
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Thanks for the kudos, muzicman.

I don't have time to do the pics right now... so I'll try to explain:

A compound miter saw has 2 adjustments. The miter adjustment is the knob in front, that changes the angle at which the saw cuts. Compound miter saws also have a bevel adjustment where you can tilt the motor/blade at an angle.

You DON'T need to change the bevel adjustment. You only need to make miters. So first, set your miter to a 45 Left. Hold the piece on the left side of the blade so that you can cut a 45 on the right side of the piece. The piece will set with the square corner away from you, with flat sides against the base and fence. Cut your 45.

Now flip the piece 180 degrees so that it is on the right side of the blade. Rotate the piece back toward the fence so that the square corner is away from you, with the flat sides against the base and fence.

Change your miter to a 45 Right. You will now cut off the left side of the piece... and try to make a perfect point, so that the miters will meet exactly in the middle of the profile.

Hopefully you can visualize this, or print it out and take it to your saw. And hopefully I've described it correctly! Good luck. I'll try to take some pictures sometime, but I won't promise you anything.
 
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Old 09-25-08, 06:23 PM
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Thanks! That makes sense. I don't know why I couldn't figure it out last night but I burned through several feet of quarter round before asking my question. I actually did figure out earlier tonight how to do it with a beveling cut, but it was a major pain. Your way is much easier. I don't think I'll need pictures.

Now the trick is getting a "perfect" arrow. That is much more difficult. I hope to get the laser on my mitre saw working again and maybe that will help.

And a big thank you from my wife. She is a perfectionist and really did not like the previous method I was using where I just butted up the wall piece to the mitred ceiling pieces. This looks much more professional. When she saw the pictures you posted above, she said "you must learn to do it that way". Tonight after my first corner, she calls me her "master crafstman" LOL
 
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Old 09-25-08, 06:46 PM
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Ha ha, that's very gratifying! Once you get an eye for finding the center of the moulding, it should go pretty well.

Milk this one for as much as you can. Tell her she really owes you now. LOL
 
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Old 09-29-08, 05:39 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Ha ha, that's very gratifying! Once you get an eye for finding the center of the moulding, it should go pretty well.

Milk this one for as much as you can. Tell her she really owes you now. LOL
Thanks again. It was milked this weekend. 4 times!!!
 
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