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What can I replace my drywall with to avoid mold growth??

What can I replace my drywall with to avoid mold growth??

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Old 06-03-08, 04:41 PM
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What can I replace my drywall with to avoid mold growth??

Hi all,
I own a tiny condo about a mile from the beach so mold is already an issue even without stupid neighbors...
I've had 4 major floods since 2005 and three of those in 2008 thanks to my neighbors upstairs (only two floors in building)! Both my bathroom and kitchen were damaged and I have a mold remediation that began this morning and at this point I don't really know how extensive the demo will be.

I had a remediation in early 2006 in the bathroom but that drywall now has mold again. I would like to replace the drywall with something that is mold resistant and I was told that wonderboard is an option and I planned to use it. Now that I'm searching for more information I read that it's very porous and susceptible to mold! I don't know what green board is and plaster probably isn't an option. I'm not replacing all of the walls - just the bottom 2 ft around the very small kitchen and one small section of bathroom. I want to use something so that if the kitchen floods and is dried out promptly - I won't have to worry about mold. It was dried out within 48 hours last month but I still ended up with mold growth on the drywall! Any ideas? All suggestions are welcome! Thanks!
 
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Old 06-03-08, 08:15 PM
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There are many products on the market these days. Have you looked in a local big box store lately? They offer mold resistant drywall.

I would not use Wonderboard myself since it is very porous.

Hardiebacker is the only product I'm familiar with that will NOT grow mold or mildew. It's commonly used as shower walls. They only come in 3'x5' sheets so it would take ALOT to do a whole room/house.

We have some very knowledgable people on here, so hang in there and wait for more responses.
 
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Old 06-04-08, 04:17 AM
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If water is entering wall void from upstairs and mold is presenting itself downstairs, then the mold is occurring in the wall void. Installing material that is mold/mildew resistant on the surface will not address mold issues inside the wall void.

Addressing plumbing issues with upstairs neighbors would be a first step. Leaky pipes? Overflowing tub or toilet? If such issues are not addressed, the problem will not go away. As you indicate, flooding has occurred several times. If you belong to a condo association, discuss the issue with them.
 
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Old 06-04-08, 04:23 AM
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After all the remediation efforts as stated by Twelvepole and Mark have been done, you can use a product by Georgia Pacific called DensArmor. It is a paperless drywall that touts the ability to shed mold and mildew. But you have to take care of the water in the voids first. In the bathroom, wet areas, use hardie or durock concrete backer underlayment, especially where there will be tile. Good luck with the remodel.
 
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Old 06-04-08, 10:30 AM
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The water/plumbing issues have been addressed but it's something new every time!! I'm afraid to go home at night and see what new disaster I will have to deal with!

First it was the toilet, then the tenants put tons of raw chicken in the garbage disposal and it backed up and flooded my kitchen, then the bathtub overflow drain had to be replaced and then the tenants overflowed the bathtub a week after being dried out!! It's unbelievable!

Some of the drywall I'm replacing is indeed a common wall. I can't control what goes on in the common wall so I want to protect my unit from that area as much as possible. I can't remediate the whole building so I'm just trying to protect myself as much as I can. After the 2005 infestation I'm EXTREMELY sensitive and have been having health issues for two years now. I want to take every precaution that I can afford as long as it's worth the money, you know?

Thanks so much for the replies!! I will look into the products you've mentioned but welcome more replies/options!
 
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Old 06-07-08, 12:18 PM
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I agree with chandler. I have had great success with GP DensArmor sheetrock. In addition to addressing any plumbing concerns before you replace the sheetrock, as mentioned by others, I think its wise to clean the exposed studs with a weak bleach solution, as well as replace any damp insulation that may be in the walls. I would also recommend leaving the studs exposed for a day or two after removing the moldy sheetrock to help dry things out. I thinks its important to address the mold that may be in the wall. The sheetrock can mold resistant, but it won't stop mold from growing in the paint on the surface if the mold isn't remediated inside the wall also. Hope that makes sense and good luck.

P.S. I know its common sense, but be careful of exposed wiring and junction boxes when cleaning the studs!
 
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