Few questions...


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Old 07-31-08, 01:53 PM
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Few questions...

Well I'm building a new house, well a shack is more like it. Basic accommodations back at my farm.

I got a lot of things I want to use out of the old farm house and things around the farm.

Well I got a couple sinks I want to use, one is a old cast kitchen sink with enamel coating, and the other is a big ceramic unit. Both need refinishing, how would I go about this?

Then I also have a claw foot bathtub that needs refinishing, but I'm not sure if I want to use that yet, I really only need a shower right now and I'd rather make a shower, but I don't want to tile it. I want to use rock from rock piles around my farm for tiling it. Would this be possible and if so what would be the best way to go about it.
 
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Old 07-31-08, 04:42 PM
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Anything is possible. A GOOD waterproofing underlayment is a must. Then you can install whatever you want.

Large metropolitan areas usually have someone that can redo a tub. Powder coating is even an good option. Check yellow pages.
 
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Old 08-01-08, 02:55 AM
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Well more specifically with the rock question, what would I use to attach it? Would thinset be enough to hold the rocks or would I need something stronger?

As far as the tub and sink goes, I'm looking for an alternative to hiring anyone, if I had to hire someone it would defeat the cost savings and I would rather just go buy new stuff.

If I knew how well automotive paint held up to uses like this I would just go ahead and pull out the HVLP and go to town, but I don't know how well it would hold up on the enamel or ceramic surfaces let alone the use it sees.

More so I would like to learn how to refinish tubs and sinks because at my rental property, I have one apartment that has god awful pink tub and sink, and I want to update the look without spending a lot. So this would be a testing ground.
 
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Old 08-01-08, 05:11 AM
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Hmmm, not sure whether thinset or mortar is the right thing. How big are the rocks??

I don't think an auto finish is durable enough. Powder coating is a DIY thing if you have a LARGE oven. After applying the powder, it must be baked for 20 min or so at 450deg. Several companies make the sprayer and powders(Eastwood is one). The usual process for in-home coatings are epoxys, as I understand the process. Tub must be preped just right, and the epoxy is really nasty stuff. I would say that is is cheaper to lets someone that has already invested in the equipment, do the job.
 
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Old 08-01-08, 05:52 AM
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There are specfic coatings for refinishing tubs/sinks but they have a high failure rate when diy. I've never refinished a sink/tub [my customers deserve better than I can give] but it's my understanding the biggest reason for failure is lack of proper prep.

You can build up a lot of weight with rocks - how will it be supported?
 
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Old 08-01-08, 01:22 PM
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Well I was gonna use cement backer board like you would with a tile shower.

I suppose I should be thinking of this more in the way we put rock on our house instead of a tile tub. Mount some mesh to the cement backer, and use mortar.
 
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Old 08-01-08, 04:12 PM
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How big are the rocks? They may need extensive support from below if there is a lot weight involved.
 
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Old 08-02-08, 03:37 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
How big are the rocks? They may need extensive support from below if there is a lot weight involved.
Well I am wanting to find flat rocks, maybe 1"-2" thick at most.
 
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Old 08-02-08, 04:42 AM
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That is still going to be a fair amount of weight. I suspect the floor framing will need to be beefed up to support the load - unless this is on a concrete slab.
 
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Old 08-02-08, 02:11 PM
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It is on a concrete slab.
 
 

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