toilet grout


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Old 01-02-09, 09:49 AM
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toilet grout

I just had new tile put on bathroom floor and he grouted with a grout that goes on white and then dries it is colorless however its been 2 weeks and it is still white is it possible that there is a leak? Please help me to understand Thanks JH
 
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Old 01-02-09, 10:03 AM
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Grout that dries colorless? Never heard of that, though I'm no pro.

Do you mean caulk (out of a tube)? It could take that long, I guess, if it is getting moisture on it, such as in a shower, or directly on damp concrete, but I've never had it happen.

Where was this material applied? Around the base of the toilet? Top of tub to tile wall joint? Floor to base of tub joint?
 
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Old 01-02-09, 12:20 PM
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Toilet grout

It was out of a tube and was used on the bottom of toilet where it meets the tile floor no tub sink or shower thanks for answering
 
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Old 01-02-09, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Lajim1030 View Post
It was out of a tube and was used on the bottom of toilet where it meets the tile floor no tub sink or shower thanks for answering
First of all you should NEVER caulk the bottom of a toilet where it meets the floor.Wax seals for toilets will go bad and by sealing the toilet to the floor this can happen without your knowledge and all the leakage will be trapped under the toilet,This will lead to floor damage and rot requiring a complete rebuilding of the floor around the toilet.

Secondly what it sounds like was used was silicone caulk which if it is clear will start out looking white then become clear.It is possible that ultimately white was used instead since traditional silicone bathroom caulk is white.

You should remove all or at least some of it to allow any possible leakage to escape.If nothing else remove a section at the back of the base of the toilet.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 02:17 PM
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Toilets are normally caulked where they meet the floor. A small space should be left uncaulked at the back so that leaks in the wax seal can be discovered quickly. The reason for caulking the toilet at the floor is not to keep water in, but to keep whatever gets on the floor from getting under the toilet.
 

Last edited by pmgca; 01-06-09 at 07:52 AM. Reason: Non-beneficial
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Old 01-05-09, 03:17 PM
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Toilet grout

Actually its caulk and not grout thats used to keep the water but I am asking when the installer used caulk it said it was white going on but would dry clear so I am asking its now been 3 wks and its still WHITE so doe that mean there is water behind the caulk? Thanks for answering JH
 
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Old 01-05-09, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Lajim1030 View Post
Actually its caulk and not grout thats used to keep the water but I am asking when the installer used caulk it said it was white going on but would dry clear so I am asking its now been 3 wks and its still WHITE so doe that mean there is water behind the caulk? Thanks for answering JH
I doubt it.I believe you were told the info for clear silicone and white was ultimately used.Clear silicone would not be white from water exposure.

And despite what has been said....do not caulk your toilet to the floor.Leakage under the toilet of urine is not a problem but unknown leakage of a wax seal is...and if it doesn't run out the back you'd still not know it was leaking.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 07:44 AM
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And despite what has been said....do not caulk your toilet to the floor.
the toilet gets caulked at the floor for the reason I mentioned. Leave an uncaulked space at the back to detect wax ring failure.
 

Last edited by pmgca; 01-06-09 at 07:55 AM. Reason: Non-beneficial
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Old 01-06-09, 07:52 AM
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Toilet grout

What you are saying is true up north but I live Fl and there is no wood to rot just concrete so toilets are caulked to the floor.Thanks to all who answered JH
 
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Old 01-06-09, 11:37 AM
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When my husband was alive we lived in several places all over this great country and abroad. I recall most all of our toilets were always caulked to the floor and in fact it has been recommended everywhere we have done our own remodelling. True we were always advised to leave the back of the toilet uncaulked for detection of a leak reasons already mentioned. I can only imagine the smelly messes we would have had when our boys were growing up if the toilets hadn't been caulked.

I have also used clear caulk (that wasn't silicone) many times on my own projects. It comes out white and dries basically clear. I did discover a leak in the wall of our tub shower one time when the clear caulk was used but never turned clear and stayed white. If that hadn't happened we would have not known about the leak for some time I guess.

When this has come up on other websites they always say either is just fine but caulking is the more sanitary way to go.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 01:57 PM
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Toilet grout

Thanks Budder Bread: You answered my question and I agree on caulking the toilet to the floor Thanks JH
 
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Old 01-06-09, 03:33 PM
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It's just a asthetic thing and serves no other purpose besides that. If your bowl sits reletively flush with the floor, there is no need.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 03:57 PM
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It's just a asthetic thing and serves no other purpose besides that
Mark

It's not an asthetic thing around here. Inspectors around here have hassled us over this. Im not a plumber but I looked back at some notes on a job we gc'd where an inspector insisted on caulking the toilet to the floor. He cited UPC 408.2 which specifies that when a fixture comes in contact with the wall or floor,the joint between the fixture and the floor shall be made watertight. He insisted that the toilet should be caulked all the way around. He insisted that this did not mean water tight in the sense of sealing the toilet to the plumbing with a wax ring. We caulk all toilets.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 05:07 PM
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Wow.

Must be a area thing because I have never seen them caulked around here.

You wouldn't even know you had a leak until you were sitting on the John and you fell through too the lower floor.

Wonder what genious came up with that code.......
 
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Old 01-06-09, 05:30 PM
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I agree with HeresJohnny
The 2003 Uniform Plumbing Code 408.2 (UPC) and the 2003 International Residential Code section P2705 (IRC) ask for fixtures caulked watertight.
However, I know that this is not "necessary / verified" in some counties
 
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Old 01-06-09, 06:23 PM
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All you have to do is deal with people who have done this and suffered the consequences to know it's a bad idea.It's all well and good for rules to be made by those in a profession for those in a profession but apply them to average homeowners and it's a whole different world.

I would never instruct a customer to caulk a toilet completely and would not even instrcut them to leave a gap because people don't always do things right.That's one of the reasons this site exists.

I would hazard a guess that at least 50% and likely more toilets will need a wax seal replaced due to leakage at some point.Imagine if all of them leaked with no escape for the water,no knowledge of the leakage and no warning until the floor rotted out.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 07:23 PM
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I've done some reading, and plumbers say you should be code compliant by caulking, but they say to leave a gap at the back of the toilet inform owners if they have a leak. If the code says "watertight," then why are they saying leave a gap?

I would rather have zero caulk and see the leak rather then finding out the hard way with all the subfloor rot.

Saying that, grout is not waterproof, so that wouldn't be "code."
 
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Old 01-06-09, 08:45 PM
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The thing is that, according with the code (IRC), it should be done with all the fixtures, not only toilets, therefore I can't see how this can be a choice
If the BD and inspections ask for this, the homeowner should comply. But again, not all the Counties have the same requirements
 
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Old 01-07-09, 07:21 AM
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If you are on a framed floor, odds are that the first sign of water will be the sheetrock in the room below, not on the tile floor. Thats been my experience.
 
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Old 01-07-09, 10:27 AM
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The solution to this issue is the return of the out house.

Some nice vinyl siding,a TV,heat and AC,padded seat with recliner/paper holder.
 
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Old 01-07-09, 02:40 PM
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It is code and yeah, inspectors here require it. I couldn't count how many toilets I've pulled but I can say with certainty, that in cases where the subfloor around a toilet needed repair, greater than 90% of the time, the toilet was not caulked.

in full baths with years of condensation accumulating on the tank and dripping down from shower steam was undoubtedly the cause. The toilet NEEDS caulk.

Back in Marck,. I pulled a toilet that was set in the 70's with NO wax ring. Not the smallest bit of water damage on the floor. Go figure
 
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Old 01-07-09, 06:31 PM
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These are the threads I like. Learn new things daily around here.
 
 

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