Thinset or tile adhesive for shower wall?


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Old 03-12-09, 08:48 AM
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Thinset or tile adhesive for shower wall?

I am redoing my bathroom and I was wondering if it would be best to use thinset for the tiles inside the shower or will regular wall tile adhesive be good enough? Also, can anyone tell me the difference between thinset and modified thinset.
 
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Old 03-12-09, 09:04 AM
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All the Pro's recommend actual "buy in a bag and mix with water" type thinset. Which type, mod or un, I don't know.

Some people have said they used "mastic" (comes in a can), but most experts say no in wet areas. Backsplashes in a kitchen maybe, but not in a shower.

There will be some tile guys around soon...I am NOT one.
 
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Old 03-12-09, 09:18 AM
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I just finished mine with Modified Thinset. It was a pain in the butt to work with. My plumber came by to do the trim work on the fixtures and said, why'd you use thinset - just use mastic! I said, the guys on the forum all said thinset. He said, ahhh you can't listen to people - you made it harder for yourself.

The guys at the tile supplier said thinset for the floor and for stone and marble, but for porcelain, ceramic wall tile the thinset can grab too hard and crack the glaze on the tile.

Of course, this is Brooklyn and everyone has their opinion!
 
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Old 03-12-09, 09:38 AM
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Jeb..no criticizm on you, of course....but "the thinset can grab too hard and crack the glaze on the tile"??? Thats one I've never heard before...lol

I'd look at it this way, you did a job that should last 30yrs or more if you want it to. Whats a little more work now, right?

Wish I'd found this place before I redid the bathroom at my old house...but thats someone elses problem now!!
 
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Old 03-12-09, 10:53 AM
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When you say "mastic" do you mean the white premixed tile adhesive that comes in a tub, or is it something different?

Jeb, How did you find it to be a pain? Isn't it the same as using the premixed? The only difference would be that you have to mix it yourself first instead of just scooping it out of the bucket.
 
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Old 03-12-09, 11:13 AM
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Mastic is tile adhesive, can, tub, or pail. Sometimes its labeled "premixed thinset" but its not the same.

Thinset is a bit harder to work with, since you have to mix the correct amount of water in, mix it completely, let it sit (slake?), then mix again and use before it hardens.(basically)

Mastic is, take the lid off, put it on with a notched trowel, stick the tile, put the lid back on (basically).

Pro's are so used to using the same good quality product that it's second nature to them, and they have the big power mixers, can work quickly...etc...they would probably use thinset even on a backsplash.

Hope that helps.
 
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Old 03-12-09, 11:49 AM
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DO NOT use anything that comes in a bucket in a shower! This stuff is horrible and should only be used on simple backsplashes.

Use a good modified thinset, like Flexbond or Versabond from HD, or Mapei Ultraflex or a Lactecrete thinset from Lowes.

There are thousands of horror stories about people using adhesive (mastic/premix thinset) in a shower or floor installation.

That plumber also has no clue about tiling.
 
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Old 03-12-09, 01:35 PM
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My plumber came by to do the trim work on the fixtures and said, why'd you use thinset - just use mastic! I said, the guys on the forum all said thinset. He said, ahhh you can't listen to people - you made it harder for yourself.
Ahh, so plumbers are tile experts too. I know they are good carpenters, Ive seen a lot of there handywork with a reciprocating saw on floor joists.
 
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Old 03-12-09, 07:35 PM
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I figured I would probably need to use the thinset, but a had a few people telling me to not bother using it because the stuff in the tub is just as good.

Thanks for the info.
 
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Old 03-13-09, 07:15 AM
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Tony

Just making sure its clear. Your gonna use bagged thinset that you mix yourself with water, correct.

Mastic should never be used in wet areas, never, ever.

And just kidding with the plumbing joke. No intent to offend anyone.
 
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Old 03-14-09, 08:44 AM
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I won't kid about plumbers! They are great carpenters! Makes my work prolonged correcting the cut joists , etc. They have no comprehension of framing and the results of cutting one board. I don't let them even have saws on my jobsite under the house. I know what they will do
BUT, good plumbers work miracles putting pipes in places where us framers make it impossible, so there's a tradeoff, and as long as there is good communications.
 
 

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