OK to replace bathtub with shower pan?

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Old 06-24-10, 07:07 PM
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OK to replace bathtub with shower pan?

My house is a 4-bedroom, 2-bath cape cod. There is a full dormer upstairs, with 2 good-size bedrooms and a full 5' x 8' bath with shower over an olive green (yes, really) tub. This bathroom needs remodeling because there is some water damage behind the tile and the shower head was mounted too low on the wall.

Downstairs is a smaller full bath, 5' x 7', also with a shower over tub. The tub has high walls, a very curved floor, and is chipped in a number of places. This bath also needs a complete remodeling.

The house was built in the 1950's; the downstairs bath is original. The dormer was added in the late 60's, the upstairs bath is also original.

I want to replace the tub in the downstairs bath with a shower pan when we remodeling, just in case we have to "age in place" (we are in our 50's). But I am reading in some places that having only one tub means your house is no longer a 2 full bath house with "just" a shower. The issue seems to be young families raising children.

Since neither of these bathrooms is big enough to have a tub and separate shower, and I am not about to knock down walls to enlarge them, am I compelled by resale issues to replace a tub that may cause problems if we have to age in place? Is it OK to have only one tub and a shower? Is there something that's a hybrid; perhaps a low-sided tub that's shorter than a conventional tub but higher than a shower pan?
 
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Old 06-25-10, 06:49 AM
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Hi hackwriter,

as a matter of fact, I don't think that changing the tub for a shower will affect the value of your home. Some showers have nice features and they are really luxurious
I did several projects where the owners specified a shower instead of a tub, for several reasons --> features, versatility... and even for the dog bath

However, if you prefer a bathtub, you can install a walk in tub
You can see several models at the Safety tubs website
Safety Tubs acrylic walk-in tub for safe bathing.
 
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Old 06-25-10, 09:16 AM
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I don't think it'll affect the value of the home either. If you are gonna live in the home, it should be comfortable for you. Why make decisions about 10 or 15 years down the road and live in a house that someone else might like, instead of what you like.

As a side note, it's not as easy as just taking out a tub and replacing it with a shower pan. Tubs have 1 1/2" drain lines back to the stack, while shower pans require 2" drain lines, so you'll have some work to do.
 
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Old 06-26-10, 04:18 PM
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That is probably avacado green, but as long as there is a tub in the house, a full shower should be fine.
 
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Old 08-09-10, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by HeresJohnny View Post
Tubs have 1 1/2" drain lines back to the stack, while shower pans require 2" drain lines, so you'll have some work to do.
I've read this in a couple of other places in my search for info on how to replace our tub with a 60" shower pan. I'm curious as to the reason. A tub has to drain a lot of water all at once when you open the drain, while a shower drain just has to keep up with the water raining down from the shower head.

Can you explain why drain line has to be larger for a standalone shower?
 
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Old 08-10-10, 05:59 AM
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I'm not a plumber, so I'm not sure that I can, I just know that its code. If you give it some thought, if the tub doesnt drain because of a clog, the tub can hold many gallons of water. A shower cannot.
 
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Old 08-10-10, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by cbrillow View Post
I've read this in a couple of other places in my search for info on how to replace our tub with a 60" shower pan. I'm curious as to the reason. A tub has to drain a lot of water all at once when you open the drain, while a shower drain just has to keep up with the water raining down from the shower head.

Can you explain why drain line has to be larger for a standalone shower?
I've asked that question a couple of times on a couple of DIY boards. I have yet to get an answer that makes sense. People frequently run a bath and walk away while the tub is filling. A clogged tub drain could be a problem. How often do people turn on the shower and walk away?
 
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Old 08-10-10, 07:35 AM
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Hackwriter - I have a 3 bedroom (originally 4) 2 1/2 bath cape. I renovated the upstairs bath, enlarging it and installing a separate tub and shower. That tub is the only tub in the house.

I removed a tub surround in a downstairs bath and I'm in the process of replacing it with a walk in shower. I talked to a couple of Real Estate agents and they both assured me that as long as the house has a tub it would not effect resale.
 
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Old 08-12-10, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Wayne Mitchell View Post
People frequently run a bath and walk away while the tub is filling. A clogged tub drain could be a problem. How often do people turn on the shower and walk away?
Thanks for your response, and for the sensible speculation. I hadn't thought of a drain clog, as I we've never had one in the bathtub. But that's probably the reason for the 2" requirement. (That and drumming up some more expensive labor fees for plumbers...)

And I agree -- it seems very unlikely that someone would ignore a running shower long enough to fill the pan and overflow. Stranger things have happened, though...
 
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Old 08-13-10, 06:33 AM
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And I agree -- it seems very unlikely that someone would ignore a running shower long enough to fill the pan and overflow. Stranger things have happened, though...
All it take is one phone call to come in while you are waiting for the water to get hot enough to get in.
 
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Old 08-13-10, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by HeresJohnny View Post
All it take is one phone call to come in while you are waiting for the water to get hot enough to get in.
Along with the untimely clogged drain. The phone call on its own ain't gonna do it...
 
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Old 08-15-10, 07:38 PM
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Answering my own question, perhaps...

Eureka!

Surprised nobody mentioned this probably reason for the 2" drain requirement: tubs have an overflow. Shower pans/floors do not!
 
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Old 08-19-10, 04:40 PM
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As it turns out, my city does not require a 2" drain line. A 2" to 1-1/2" adapter installed right at the pan outlet is acceptable.
 
 

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