TV Behind a Mirror


  #1  
Old 07-27-10, 04:54 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
TV Behind a Mirror

I have a client that wants me to mount a TV behind her bathroom vanity mirror. Here are some specifics:
- Existing mirror is 40H x 96W.
- The back side of this wall is a hallway. So there's no room to build out the back side. A flat panel tv will be necessary.

I need some guidance on this type of install.
-What type of TV is best? Are there specific TV's made for this application?
-Do I need ventilation for the TV?
-What type of mirror?
-What's the best way to mount the TV?
-Does this need to be a hardwire install or can the TV simply plug into a receptical mounted within the cavity?


Thanks,
Joe
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 07-27-10 at 06:27 PM. Reason: Company name removed. NO ADVERTISING
  #2  
Old 07-27-10, 07:22 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,265
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'm missing something, so first 2 stupid questions & 1 smart question. How will she watch TV if it's behind a mirror? Will she watch it from inside the bathroom or in the hall? Is it a load bearing wall?

I can answer 2 of the questions. It shouldn't need to be hardwired & it needs some air to breathe.
 
  #3  
Old 07-28-10, 05:07 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 12,266
Received 259 Upvotes on 210 Posts
I'm not sure the humidity in the bathroom would make it a very good idea.
 
  #4  
Old 07-28-10, 05:48 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,279
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Wow, I gotta hear more about this. Hope you come back with more info Joe.
 
  #5  
Old 07-28-10, 06:34 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,163
Received 1,273 Upvotes on 1,213 Posts
I've seen TVs set behind mirrors so it's like you're watching it through a window. I would imagine you'd have to remove the reflective coating in that area to make it a window.
 
  #6  
Old 07-28-10, 07:03 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Interesting... some of the replies here talk as though this is a new concept. It really isn't. I have seen it done on many of the DIY shows in bathrooms for a few years now. The TV is mounted in the wall, behind a mirror (two way mirror I presume), and the homeowner can watch TV while getting ready at the vanity or from the tub.

I'm curious to know the procedure, the type of mirror, and if a special "low heat" version of a flat panel TV is required? In my humble opinion, out of everything here, the TV heat is the biggest concern to deal with. It might not be possible with my particular install as I don't have a "back side" to the wall to work with for ventilation-- it's a hallway.

If I can pull it off, I will certainly caulk the mirror to keep moisture/humidity away from the TV. As far as the wall being load bearing, yes it is, but will be handled in framing.

Thanks,
Joe
 
  #7  
Old 07-28-10, 07:44 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Just a thought a decorative but functional vanished wood louvered grill in the hallway wall perhaps with one or more CT switched fans. Not sure if you can get a CT switch that has a threshold setting so you could maintain minimal power to screen when off without activating the fans,
 
  #8  
Old 07-28-10, 09:00 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ray2047:
Yeah, something along that line might work, I would have to run it past the client. But, this is a half million dollar home, and they're pretty particular.
 
  #9  
Old 07-28-10, 09:10 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 7 Upvotes on 7 Posts
Just a thought...are you using 2x6 framing? That would give a little more room for ventilation. And maybe just some false vents above and below?

An OLED TV would be great for this....but they are very limited in size and still very expensive.
 
  #10  
Old 07-28-10, 09:17 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
No, 2x4 framing.

Do LED TV's run cooler than LCD.
I know Plasma's run very hot, plus they aren't nearly as bright as LCD/LED so not a good choice for this application.
 
  #11  
Old 07-28-10, 09:34 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 7 Upvotes on 7 Posts
I believe LCDs do run cooler...but I was refering to OLED...super thin, as in just a few mm thick and very power efficient. Problem is they haven't taken off like was expected and supplies are very limited. Possibly not even available.

How big a screen do they desire? Also...I'd consider the fact that it would probably only be on for a relatively short time....you shouldn't need a huge amount of ventilation.

Aren't there some high end A/V places still in business over in your area? I know there used to be when I lived in VB. You may want to check with them.
 
  #12  
Old 07-28-10, 09:43 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
How wide is the hallway? Is there romm to put a tall cabinet or wardrobe on short legs, one about a foot deep? The cabinet could be gutted inside have the back cut out in the area of the TV. An exhaust fan could pull air up through the bottom and out the top. If the TV needs more depth then the wall it could be partly in the cabinet.
 
  #13  
Old 07-28-10, 09:44 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Oh, ok. I've never even heard of OLED-- just LED.

One thing I need to consider as well... There needs to be some way of accessing this TV without having to pull the mirror which means an access panel in the hallway. So, if they want me to do this, I think a louvered access door is the way to go.
 
  #14  
Old 07-28-10, 09:47 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ray- given the configuration, that probably isn't an option. I'll tuck that in the back of my head though, just in case.
 
  #15  
Old 07-28-10, 11:20 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Originally Posted by J and M
Ray- given the configuration, that probably isn't an option. I'll tuck that in the back of my head though, just in case.
Acutally I think
a louvered access door
is a better solution.

Have you considered using a LED computer monitor instead of a TV with RF controlled receiver and amps concealed in a cabinet in the bathroom?
 
  #16  
Old 07-28-10, 12:39 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ray2047
Have you considered using a LED computer monitor instead of a TV with RF controlled receiver and amps concealed in a cabinet in the bathroom?
No, I haven't. A computer monitor would be considerably more expensive when you get into the larger sizes though (at least last time I checked).
 
  #17  
Old 07-28-10, 01:12 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,163
Received 1,273 Upvotes on 1,213 Posts
What size screen do they want?
 
  #18  
Old 07-28-10, 02:04 PM
Beachboy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Northeast Kansas
Posts: 704
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
If the TV was mounted behind a mirrored surface, wouldn't that interfere with the IR remote control capability? You will also need outboard speakers, because the TV's built-in speakers will be highly muffled behind the mirror. Two-way mirrors greatly reduce light transmission, so the TV's picture would be considerabily dimmer than normal. All in all, it sounds like an installation nightmare to me.
 
  #19  
Old 07-28-10, 03:18 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
  #20  
Old 07-28-10, 06:58 PM
E
Member
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 426
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Beachboy
If the TV was mounted behind a mirrored surface, wouldn't that interfere with the IR remote control capability? You will also need outboard speakers, because the TV's built-in speakers will be highly muffled behind the mirror. Two-way mirrors greatly reduce light transmission, so the TV's picture would be considerabily dimmer than normal. All in all, it sounds like an installation nightmare to me.
I dont believe IR was mentioned, RF on the other hand was.

Ive actually only seen this installation succesfully done ONCE. It was a 15 million dollar home here in Jersey. The company that did it is a high end home automation and lighting contractor. From what i remember, they used a special 2 way mirror that functions like a mirror when the tv is off, and when the TV is on, you see the tv only, not the mirror and not both. The TV and reciever were controlled by RF and there were fans mounted inside the framing of the tv cavity. It was a 50 inch tv, they used 6 fans. 3 blowing and 3 sucking. they were turned on by the Reciever.
 
  #21  
Old 07-29-10, 04:44 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ElectricJoeNJ
I dont believe IR was mentioned, RF on the other hand was.

Ive actually only seen this installation succesfully done ONCE. It was a 15 million dollar home here in Jersey. The company that did it is a high end home automation and lighting contractor. From what i remember, they used a special 2 way mirror that functions like a mirror when the tv is off, and when the TV is on, you see the tv only, not the mirror and not both. The TV and reciever were controlled by RF and there were fans mounted inside the framing of the tv cavity. It was a 50 inch tv, they used 6 fans. 3 blowing and 3 sucking. they were turned on by the Reciever.
Good info. Cooling, I figured, was going to be a big issue. Thanks!
 
  #22  
Old 07-29-10, 05:21 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
J and M did you see my post on Google hits? You may be trying to reinvent the wheel.
 
  #23  
Old 07-29-10, 05:24 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
Posts: 43
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ray- Yes I did. Plan to check those out today. Thanks!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: