Need advice: beadboard in bathroom


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Old 08-03-10, 09:12 AM
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Need advice: beadboard in bathroom

I've got the standard 60's tile bathroom (the tile is about 4' high), and this tile is set in a lot of cement right against the exterior bricks; it won't come out easily. I was thinking about maybe covering it with MDF beadboard (using a thin layer of foam insulation board over the tile first), and some creative molding to deal with the ends. Any thoughts, warnings, or advice on this idea? Any suggestions for a better approach? Thanks!
 
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Old 08-03-10, 08:39 PM
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Originally Posted by flukeslapper
I've got the standard 60's tile bathroom (the tile is about 4' high), and this tile is set in a lot of cement right against the exterior bricks; it won't come out easily. I was thinking about maybe covering it with MDF beadboard (using a thin layer of foam insulation board over the tile first), and some creative molding to deal with the ends. Any thoughts, warnings, or advice on this idea? Any suggestions for a better approach? Thanks!
Covering up problematic areas while remodeling your home is never a good idea - especially in a bathroom - a space exposed to high humidity levels, plus MDF does not work well with moisture, this way you just increase your chances to get MOLD in your bathroom, so my advice would be - take your time and just replace the tile, in the long run it is very worth it! And a big NO to MDF! Green board will do the job so much better, as it is resistant to mold and moisture.
 
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Old 08-03-10, 08:48 PM
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Thanks for the feedback, BarefootFloor. Removing the tile will be a monumental task (I know because I replaced a few broken tiles, and it was a nightmare). I was a bit concerned about the moisture issue using MDF or wood, though. Definitely not looking for rot or mold problems!
 
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Old 08-03-10, 09:28 PM
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MDF + moisture

Yes, moisture is a very serious issue... I have seen some houses where they used MDF in additions, and it was terrible.. you can tell there is a moisture problem the moment you walk in - it smells BAD. Mold can be dangerous..
 

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Old 08-04-10, 05:56 AM
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They do sell a PVC beadboard. I would look into using that. Seen it at Lowes, Evertrue brand.
 
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Old 08-04-10, 06:25 AM
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Hey, thanks ElectricJoeNJ! I was wondering if they'd gotten around to making that yet. That could be the ticket - I really would prefer not to rip the entire room apart, if I don't have to.
Update: Just checked the Lowes site, and couldn't find that product listed. Evertrue was all wood or MDF. Will have to check the store.
 
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Old 08-04-10, 07:12 PM
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heres the number for it. This is for 8 foot tall pieces. 3 to a pack, 7 1/2" wide. #304525
 
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Old 08-04-10, 09:11 PM
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Great - thanks so much for the info!
 
 

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