replacing shower walls with stud/tub gaps


  #1  
Old 08-15-10, 11:28 AM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question replacing shower walls with stud/tub gaps

Hello all,

Here's some background on my situation: I just finished removing the tub, tile and walls from my 1st floor shower due to a combination of water damage, mold and poor tub condition. As far as I know, the shower was original to the house, built in 1979 (I bought the place last year). I've been inspecting and improving things in sections as I've had the time since then. While replacing the tub overflow, I accidentally knocked one of the wall tiles loose (!!) and found that the base of the wet wall (green board) had basically turned to powder. I stripped out the caulking and found that I had mold issues surrounding the base of the wall/tub connection. It turns out that all of the tile in the shower was hung using a glob of adhesive in the center of each and glued directly to the green board and then the tile was grouted from the shower side leaving open space between the tiles and wall for the majority of the shower. Eventually the grout cracked in places and moisture found its way in for who knows how long and ruined the wall. In addition to all of that, the tub was beginning to rust out in places...so pulled it all out, which leads to the present day.

After removing everything and setting the new tub in place, I've found that the studs aren't flush with the tub. In fact, the gap is all over the place from 3/16" up to 1/2". I snapped some photos and labeled the gaps from each stud to the inside of the tub flange to clarify things:

Photos of gaps/walls

Now, my plan was to staple up some 6 mil sheeting, seal it to the tub flange, hang cement board up and tie into the existing wall, silicone the hell out of the base, thin-set up 4"x4" tile over the cement board, grout, touch up the remaining wall and repaint. Thanks to the gap issues I think that's out the window.

At this point I'm stumped on how to proceed. I could shim up the studs as necessary to get the wall to match up to the tub (or) marry in some 2x4's to the existing studs to hang the board from (or) tear out the rest of the walls up to ceiling level and re-do them completely. I'd just as soon not demo the rest of the walls above the shower area since they're in good shape...but that would cause me to have to slope the backer board in order to tie it in (I think). I have zero experience when it comes to jointing in a new wall to an existing textured ceiling...but I guess I'll give it a shot if I have to. In any event, I want to get it done as correctly as possible, while keeping the destruction to a minimum (and hopefully without messing with the ceiling).

I'm basically going in circles on this at the moment. I would appreciate any advice whatsoever on the best way to proceed. I'm not in a huge rush since I have a second shower to use, but I'd like to knock this out before too long. Thanks again!
 
  #2  
Old 08-16-10, 05:25 AM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,265
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Marry new studs to the existing studs. You may have to use 2x6s. Then hang the wonder board or whatever you are going to use. I just did the same thing to install a shower pan. It worked quite well.
 
  #3  
Old 08-16-10, 08:10 AM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,049
Received 26 Upvotes on 21 Posts
What you are seeing is common. If you have a table saw shimming is probably the easiest way to go. You can just rip shims from 2X stock. If you don't have a table saw you can still cut shims from other materials with a circ saw.

Even if you "marry" studs alongside existing ones you are going to have to deal with the tub lip. Most people shim the studs to get the framing to match the lip.
 
  #4  
Old 08-16-10, 04:59 PM
Y
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the quick replies! Should I taper the studs/shims to have the cement board line up with the rest of the wall or do I need to take the top bit out as well? If the rest of the wall must go, is it feasible to leave a small section along the top to tie the new wall into or will that stick out like a sore thumb?
 
  #5  
Old 08-16-10, 08:07 PM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,049
Received 26 Upvotes on 21 Posts
The only reason you would have to cut tapered shims is if the wall is out of plumb. The objective with shimming is to get a flat, plumb wall where the framing ends up even with the inner edge of the tub lip.
 
  #6  
Old 08-17-10, 06:59 AM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,265
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If you marry new studs to the existing studs, it doesn't matter if the wall is plumb as long as the new studs are plumb.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: