Cut/trim tile around shower head

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-08-10, 05:49 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cut/trim tile around shower head

I've got to cut a 13x13 tile to fit around my shower head pipe.
It's right on the edge of the tile, and I'm not sure what the best procedure is for cutting, trimming, "breaking" to tackle this situation.

The grout line is on the edge of the piece that covers the hole in the wall around the shower pipe.

I've got pictures, but I'm unsure how to post.

Any help suggestions are welcome.

Thanks in advance.

Mike
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-08-10, 07:44 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,119
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Tile nippers, angle grinder w/ diamond blade or even a Dremel with appropriate bit. Gotta be careful with nippers..take little bites.

For pictures...see this....http://forum.doityourself.com/electr...your-post.html
 
  #3  
Old 10-08-10, 03:36 PM
kolias's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,429
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
It happens all the times and working on the edge of a tile is more tricky, make sure you have some spare tiles because you may need them.

The way I do it ? I cover the area with masking tape and mark my diameter. Then I use a tile bit and drill a few holes on the perimeter and then a tile hand saw and carefully go from hole to hole.
 
  #4  
Old 10-09-10, 06:35 AM
HotxxxxxxxOKC's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 8,044
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Gosh, a 4 inch angle grinder would make quick work of this.....
 
  #5  
Old 10-09-10, 07:41 AM
kolias's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,429
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Originally Posted by HotinOKC View Post
Gosh, a 4 inch angle grinder would make quick work of this.....
I agree, but sometimes wall tiles are very thin and fragile especially inexpensive ones and a grinder will be more difficult in this case. I use the grinder on thicker tiles.

In addition, the shower head pipe is only 1/2" and so you want to make a hole on the ceramic lets say 5/8Ē or 3/4" and thatís more difficult with a grinder.

At least thatís my experience
 
  #6  
Old 10-11-10, 04:19 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,524
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
In addition, the shower head pipe is only 1/2" and so you want to make a hole on the ceramic lets say 5/8Ē or 3/4" and thatís more difficult with a grinder.
Diamond core bits work best for small holes like this.
 
  #7  
Old 10-31-10, 05:06 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for suggestions

Sorry, I've been waiting for more tile (wife made custom order) so I can proceed. I'm heading to big box this morning in search of diamond blade hole saw.

I also received a suggestion:
Mark the tile with the location of the hole, remove the showerhead pipe (unscrew) from its fitting behind the wall, apply adhesive to tile/wall and let dry. Then drill the hole in the tile, and screw showerhead pipe (with pipe dope on threads) back into fitting behind the wall. His premise is I had less chance of cracking the tile with it already on the wall, vs drilling hole, then trying to put tile on the wall without breaking the tile at the edge (its weakest point).

Here's a pic:

http://i1118.photobucket.com/albums/...e/100_1198.jpg
 

Last edited by mpheine; 10-31-10 at 05:42 AM.
  #8  
Old 10-31-10, 06:51 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
that is not right on the edge.

i use a tile hole bit. works great.
be carefull with getting the bit to start, if you can drill from the back it will go a lot easier. place the tile on a piece of wood when drilling.
 
  #9  
Old 10-31-10, 07:41 AM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I think some of us misunderstood the location of the cut. That's what prompted the angle grinder and tile nipper responses. A picture is indeed worth a thousand words.

Anyway, I'm with condo owner. I use clamps to hold the tile to a piece of plywood and drill with a diamond bit hole saw. I would not mount the tile and drill in place because if you miss a little bit you have a bigger problem.
 
  #10  
Old 11-01-10, 10:55 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,524
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Drill the hole first, then install the tile. If you install it, drill the hole and then break the tile you have a bigger problem in trying to remove the broken tile and not bust up the cement board behind it.
 
  #11  
Old 11-08-10, 06:39 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I did as you guys suggested and drilled the hole in the tile with a diamond hole saw. I broke the first tile drilling the 1/4 " pilot hole. Needless to say, I took my time on the second tile. I think I spent an hour drilling the tile. I took frequent breaks during the drilling, spraying the tile and the bit with cold air from an air compressor.

My biggest worry now is breaking the tile when I press the "buttered" tile onto the wall.

Suggestions welcome.......as always!

Thanks again guys for the input.
 
  #12  
Old 11-08-10, 10:10 PM
N
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 448
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I've done this over 20 times, and I don't have a diamond grit hole saw of any size.

I just mark the center of my hole on the tile (taking into account the grout line widths) and predrill a hole through the center of the hole with a masonary bit. Then I keep enlarging that hole with progressively larger masonary bits until I have a 3/8 inch hole in the tile. Then I use a "Remgrit" blade suitable for mounting in a jig saw to enlarge the hole to the right size. Always always always use masking tape on the steel shoe of the jig saw to prevent marking up the face of the tile with ceramic dust that gets caught between the jig saw and the tile. My method doesn't work any better, but I find that a Remgrit jig saw blade can cut different size holes, whereas a diamond grit hole saw can only cut one size of hole.

Mpheine:

Your next step will be grouting.

When mixing the grout, the instructions will probably tell you to let it "slake" after mixing for 10 to 15 minutes. That simply means to let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before remixing it. During this time, the grout will become thicker, and the unexperienced will be tempted to add water to the grout to thin it. Don't. Wall tile grout is thixoplastic, which means that it thins with shear stress. Once the slaking period is over, you'll find that mixing it restores it back to the workable condition it was in prior to the slaking period. If you add water to thin it, then once you start mixing, it'll be TOO thin and watery to work with.

Also:

1. When you're grouting, don't mix up more than about 2 cups worth of grout at a time. Apply those two cups with a rubber float, and keep some popsicle sticks handy to pack the edges of the grout lines in the area grouted. You don't want a thin film of grout covering the grout line that will later break away exposing an ungrouted joint between two tiles.

2. Apply masking tape to the front and side edges of a "margin trowel" to grout the joints between the faucet knobs and tub spout where the rubber float won't fit.



3. When grouting, it's immensely easier to wipe the grout joints down to a uniform depth if you START with them at a uniform depth. So, after grouting, but before you pick up a sponge, use a popsicle stick or tea spoon to scrape the grout joints down to a uniform depth (being careful where grout lines intersect). Then, wiping down the joints will go very quickly and easily since the popsicle stick did 99% of the work.

4. Always keep a green or white Scotch brite pad on hand when grouting. That way, if the grout starts to dry up on you faster than you can take it off with a damp sponge, you can always scrub it off real fast with a damp Scotchbrite pad of the kind sold in grocery stores for scouring pots and cleaning more delicate materials. Scotchbrite pads have an abrasive right inside the nylon fiber the Scotchbrite pad is made of, but my experience is that even the abrasive in the green pads isn't hard enough to harm the surface of glazed wall tiles. In my opinion, a white Scotchbrite pad will provide aggressive removal of fresh grout without any concern whatsoever about harming the glazed surface of the tiles.

5. Please don't grout the tiny gap between your bottom row of tiles and the bathtub. Use some masking tape to prevent grout from getting into that gap. You want to grout everything but that gap, and use silicone caulk over that gap. If you don't, and grout gets into that gap, then you can have tiny cracks form in the glazed surface of the bottom row of tiles due to building movement and the force of the bathtub exerted on the bottom row of tiles. With silicone in that gap, the bottom row of tiles won't form those tiny cracks in the glazed surface cuz the silicone compresses.

6. Decide now whether you want to grout the corners of the tiling at the front and back of the tub or silicone them. I prefer to grout them, and I just schmear the grout into those corners with a finger. Make the same decision for the joints between your tiling and the painted walls beside it. Unless you used bullnose tile there, I just fill in that joint with a fillet of grout.

7. And, finally, give your grout two weeks to dry and seal with a grout sealer. I, personally, haven't had good luck with penetrating sealers, and I hope you have better results than I did. However, if you don't seem to get good results with a penetrating grout sealer, I'm living proof that a film forming ACRYLIC sealer will provide good servide as well. I import my grout sealer from a company called Glaze 'N Seal in California. If you live in the US, you can get the same sealer without as much hassle with brokerage fees and importation duties and such.

Stay away from any grout sealer that says it contains ANYTHINGsiloxane. That word siloxane means that it's a SILICONE based grout sealer, which I feel should be taken off the market. A bit of background: Silicon and carbon both have 4 valence electrons. So, chemists tried to make the same kind of plastics with silicon that they made with carbon. To some extent they succeeded. However, one of the problems with the "silicone" rubber they produced is that nothing stuck well to it, not even more silicone rubber. It's the same problem with silicone based grout sealers. They work fine on the first coat, but you can't ADD more coats later on to restore the level of protection because the new silicone based grout sealer won't stick properly to the old silicone based grout sealer that already sticking to the grout. So, if a penetrating grout sealer doesn't seem to work for you, then use an ACRYLIC film forming sealer. Acrylic grout sealers are very similar to latex paint in that you can keep applying successive coats of acrylic sealer to maintain the protection, just as you can keep repainting walls with latex paint. Each coat of latex paint will stick well to the previous coat of latex paint provided that previous coat is reasonably clean.

And, I can give you directions on how to caulk with silicone cauk, how to clean mildew off of old silicone caulk, and how to replace silicone caulk, (without any of this retarded advice like filling the bathtub full of water before caulking) but that's another post.
 
  #13  
Old 11-10-10, 05:38 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Nestor......your the BOMB!

Thanks for the serious input.
I'll be putting the tile around the shower head pipe this weekend.

Now as far as the grout goes, I've got a couple of ?s

First, I'm using a grout product called LATICRETE SPECTRALOCK PRO.

It was recommended as a superior grout for kitchens, baths, showers, etc.
I've heard it is a bit of a pain, but the results are lasting.

Here's my main ?:

When I start to grout the walls, do I start at bottom of wall and work up?
Basically, what is the sequence recommended for grouting a shower stall?

Thanks again for all input.

Mike
 
  #14  
Old 01-24-11, 07:22 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 19
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Some finished product!

Ok, finally got this sucker in a useable mode. Here are some pics to enjoy:
Tile on wall after drilling for shower head pipe. One note here, the cover piece that slides over
the showerhead pipe barely makes it to the grout line, which is why I had to drill and not nip!

http://i1118.photobucket.com/albums/...e/100_1220.jpg
Shower wall finished.

http://i1118.photobucket.com/albums/...e/100_1238.jpg
Floor
http://i1118.photobucket.com/albums/...e/100_1239.jpg
Opposite wall from shower.
http://i1118.photobucket.com/albums/...e/100_1240.jpg

thank you guys for all your input!
 

Last edited by mpheine; 01-24-11 at 07:33 PM. Reason: added additional pics
  #15  
Old 01-25-11, 12:00 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,524
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Looks good. Nice Job.
 
  #16  
Old 01-30-11, 08:57 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts


..........................
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: