Enlarging Existing Granite Faucet Hole?

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Old 01-05-11, 06:30 AM
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Enlarging Existing Granite Faucet Hole?

We just puchased a new faucet for our kitchen (Kohler Karbon KOHLER: K-6227-C11: KarbonŽ articulating deck-mount kitchen faucet: Kitchen Sink Faucets: Faucets: Kitchen). It is a single spout faucet, but it also requires a seperate hole for the lever control. We currently have two existing holes (1 3/8") for our old faucet in the granite at 8" apart. However when reading the instructions for the new Karbon faucet it states that the lever hole should be 2" in diameter, which is a bit unsusal for a faucet hole.

So my problem is that the existing hole would need to be enlarged some. I know they do make 2" diamond hole saws, but is there any extra issue with possibly cracking my granite if we tried to enlarge the existing hole? We might just try and contract this out, but most people I've talked to haven't ever heard of a hole this size.
 
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Old 01-05-11, 03:24 PM
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Without a guide than can be clamped or glued in place, a hole saw won't work. It will walk all over the place.

I would call a granite guy. One oopppsss and you are looking at a new top. VERIFY the hole size with the faucet out of the box. Consider a different faucet.
 
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Old 01-05-11, 05:11 PM
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Thanks for the reply. I was leaning toward calling a granite person to do the work as I don't want to even try to do that! Besides a hole saw what else would they use? I would imagine, while rare, folks would do this occasionally?

Too late on picking another faucet, that one has been ordered and is on it's way We will be waiting until we get the faucet in our hands before calling around.
 
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Old 01-05-11, 05:43 PM
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Even though the hole is small you could use a router
 
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Old 01-05-11, 06:26 PM
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Is this something any granite contractor could do?
 
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Old 01-06-11, 05:25 AM
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I would guess that it would be cheaper to send the faucet back and get a new one then to hire a granite guy to come out.
 
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Old 01-06-11, 06:49 AM
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Well, my wife and I love the faucet so we were okay with paying some money to have someone do the work. I was just curious (if done properly) what the risk was for enlarging an existing hole in the countertop? If we have to return the faucet because the risk is to high or costly then that's fine.
 
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Old 01-06-11, 08:21 AM
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I followed your link and I think that is an awesome faucet. So is the price. If you are investing that much for your faucet the couple of hundred bucks a granite pro might charge would be worth it.

I'm not a granite guy but I don't think enlarging the hole would be too difficult with a granite router. If there is an issue it would probably be with having enough room with the top already installed.
 
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Old 01-08-11, 03:49 AM
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Before you buy the faucet, call a couple of fabricators/installers in your area to see if you can get someone to enlarge the hole. It may or may not be something they want to take the responsibility of doing, and it probably will not be cheap, since the downside risk for them is that they could crack or damage the countertop.
 
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Old 01-08-11, 04:43 AM
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I agree with the liability thing sending contractors running. It will probably take a wet coring saw with a vacuum base to accurately and safely cut the granite. Saws rent for about $75 a day, bit will cost about $25 to rent, plus about $4 per 1000th of an inch, which you probably won't wear at all. That's plus labor. So check with your contractor to see how they plan on doing it. I doubt a dry router will work, maybe, but it will vibrate considerably.
 
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Old 01-08-11, 06:54 AM
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my bet is that whom ever does the work, will tell you = NO liability.
if it breaks, tough luck. though i would expect it wouldn't. depends on how much "meat" is around the hole.
 
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Old 01-08-11, 10:37 AM
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Thanks for the input. What about an attachment to a dremel (or similar) tool that would effectively chisel or file out to the needed size? I've got the faucet in hand and yes it does require the lever hole to be 2" The good thing is that the plate on top does overlap some, so the hole wouldn't need to be exactly perfect around the edges.
 
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Old 01-10-11, 06:11 AM
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Send an improper shock wave through granite and it is toast. Be careful in whatever you do. Wear eye protection and good luck.
 
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Old 01-10-11, 06:40 AM
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Weatherboy - Now that all the opinions are in, have you tried contacting any of the granite pros in your area to get their expert opinion on doing this?

If you decide to DIY it, pick their brains for the best method/tool and buy a cheap piece of scrap granite to practice on.
 
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Old 01-10-11, 07:57 AM
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Thanks all for the advice! I'm thinking this is something I will contract out and I'm calling around to see if folks will do this for me. This is something that I would not like to screw up
 
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Old 01-10-11, 08:06 AM
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good plan. I agree that you definitely want an insured professional to drill your hole. granite is easy to break and expensive to replace!
 
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Old 01-10-11, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by sueseo View Post
granite is easy to break and expensive to replace!
idk about that. i have a softer granite. when we picked it out. the lady asked if i wanted a sample to take home. she got a hammer and started beating the end of the full slab. it took some real effort to break off a hunk.

i guess it depends on many things, as to what will make it break
 
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Old 01-11-11, 07:14 AM
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I agree. While granite isn't impervious to damage, it's pretty tough. I have a slab of scrap granite built into a workbench. I use it as a surface plate when I need a hard, flat surface. I've dropped a lot of stuff on it over the years and it's still undamaged.
 
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Old 01-13-11, 06:47 AM
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Weatherboy - I think I saw your faucet on This New House last night.

Don't forget to let us know how you made out with enlarging the hole.
 
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Old 01-14-11, 06:52 AM
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Could a diamond x-bit attach to a regular corded drill?. Turns out that after I got the faucet and re-measured again closely the hole only needs to be enlarged just an 1/8" or so. So I'd presume just being able to grind around the edges (slowly) would work and I'd love to be able to plug a bit into my corded drill to do this. The base of the faucet (~2 5/8") is plenty wide enough to cover any minor mistakes or nicks around the edge.
 
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Old 01-14-11, 04:33 PM
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It won't matter what you measured. What does the spec sheet say the hole has to be? There may be a needed room to get all the piping and hose into the hole at one time.
Anyway, take some before pictures, just in case you shock a crack through it. At least you will know what it looked like before. Advice given. Your serve.
 
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Old 01-15-11, 07:38 AM
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If you opt to DIY this, you might consider picking up a piece of cheap scrap granite and practice enlarging a hole before trying it out on your countertop.

I have little experience working with granite (actually my only experience is watching it get installed) but if I were doing this I would probably use a router instead of a drill and I would make a guide template(s) so that I would only be taking very small bites per pass.
 
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Old 01-16-11, 09:45 AM
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there are diamond jig saw blades. making many little cuts into the side of the hole would work. and perhaps the safest way. just go easy and let the blade do the work.

Shop LENOX T-Shank Diamond Jig Saw Blade at Lowes.com
 
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Old 01-17-11, 11:09 AM
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All done - I broke down and had a granite professional come out at cut the new hole. All they did is use a hole saw and cut around the old hole. Here is the result.

Thanks for all the advice here!

 
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Old 01-18-11, 06:55 AM
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I broke down and had a granite professional come out at cut the new hole.
Smart choice, that looks great.
 
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Old 01-18-11, 07:35 AM
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The faucet is indeed the one I saw on This New House. It looks great. Kudos to you for making the right decision to go with a pro and also for sticking by your guns to get the install you wanted.
 
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Old 01-18-11, 03:48 PM
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Thanks for the kind words and again thanks for all the advice.
 
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Old 01-19-11, 02:41 PM
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If you don't mind, approximately how much did they charge you for that? I had something similar and I ended up spending a lot of money to DIY it......of course, I got some tools out of it.
 
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Old 01-21-11, 04:26 PM
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We paid around $100 for the right hole to be enlarged and to have another new one drilled for the center of the faucet.
 
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