possible to 'remove' laminate backsplash?


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Old 03-06-11, 01:25 PM
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possible to 'remove' laminate backsplash?

We don't have the finances to remodel the entire kitchen right now but do have some relatively cheap update ideas- one is to replace our dated laminate counter top.
Two issues that came up are: #1) Can we install new laminate over the old, or do we have to remove the old layer first? ...AND #2) We'd like to tile the backsplash since it's currently all just bare wall, and want to remove the curved, molded laminate backsplash to add some extra overall space plus allow us to tile directly to the counter top. Is it possible to remove that backsplash? Only way I can think of is to remove the entire counter from the base cabinets and use a jigsaw or reciprocating saw to cut off the backsplash...presents problems of obtaining a precise cut with no gaps left at the wall. Anyone know of any easier way? (or maybe it's a foolish idea...?)
 
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Old 03-06-11, 01:36 PM
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You might as well make new tops. It isn't very hard to do yourself. You are already willing to relaminate the old one. I'm guessing that since the blackslash is curved, the front of your counter is curved as well. You won't be able to laminate a curve like that on your own.
 
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Old 03-07-11, 01:37 PM
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NO- the front is not curved, it's squared off at 90 degrees.
 
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Old 03-07-11, 04:04 PM
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A common fit for the back splash is to make contact at the top and leave a gap below, which might mean if you cut the top off, there will be a gap. Now, that can be filled and the new laminate could cover it. In addition, the new laminate would cover the cut area and any mistakes.

I have a small battery powered circular say and with a fresh blade I have made some similar cuts. It will leave a chunk of material to be removed with a belt sander, but can be done. The old laminate can be removed or covered if it is secure.

drooplug is correct, a new counter top would be better and a lot easier, but I guess I remember back when I had to do things the hard way as well .

Bud
 
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Old 03-07-11, 06:12 PM
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The substrate isn't going to cost a lot of money either. If you use particle board, make sure you put some laminate underneath on the buildup. This will protect it from water that drips down and rolls under the counter. Otherwise it will swell up and get ruined. Also do the buildup in the back so you stay level. That can just be pieced together with scrap or something.
 
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Old 03-09-11, 08:04 PM
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It is advisable to wear eye goggles and gloves before removing the laminate backsplash. The eye goggles will serve as your protection from flying chunks of plywood and laminate.
 
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Old 03-17-11, 05:57 PM
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Thanks for all of your tips. I think it sounds like we should just replace the entire countertop. I like drooplug's suggestion,
"If you use particle board, make sure you put some laminate underneath on the buildup. This will protect it from water that drips down and rolls under the counter. Otherwise it will swell up and get ruined."
This made me think about water inevitably dripping into the base cabinet under the sink (they always seem to drip there) so I think when we do this project I will place (with construction adhesive) some extra laminate sheeting on the floor of the base cabinet under the sink to prevent those drips from rotting the wooden floor of that cabinet.
Thanks again for your input & suggestions.
 
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Old 07-18-11, 05:59 PM
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******FINAL NOTE:*******
I ended up refinishing the entire countertop using an off-the-shelf kit from the local big box store. It's a Rustoleum product, it took me 3 days to complete it, and it only cost me $275 for all of the materials (kit, drop cloths, tape, etc) and that saved me from having to custom-order all new counter. It's a very durable and hard finish on the new surface- doesn't scratch or get scuffed like the original formica.
 
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Old 07-19-11, 07:03 AM
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You painted the countertops?
 
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Old 07-19-11, 09:49 AM
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no- it's a boxed kit that sells in the paint department of Lowes/ Home Depot for about $250.00. Rustoleum is the manufacturer, but it's not for stone- basically refinishes your laminate. It's pretty straightforward (but some elbow grease is needed)- you sand off the old counter finish by hand (I wouldn't recommend anything mechanical because you might overdo it) then paint on the thick base color that you selected. Then apply color chips- very similar to the process used for garage floors. After they dry you sand the surface smooth then seal it with a clear coat/hardener. The whole process took me 3 days; it allows for error and shows you how to fix simple (common) mistakes while doing it. The kit comes complete with everything you need. Rustoleum has video tutorials right on their website demonstrating and advertising this product. I'm no salesman or company rep it just saved me from having to buy new custom-fit (aren't they all?) counters.
 
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Old 07-19-11, 11:23 AM
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Sounds to me like you did paint the countertops.

This has been discussed in other threads previously, the durability was always questioned - you'll have to keep us apprised of how this works out for you.
 
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Old 07-21-11, 12:01 PM
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painted, 'refinished', 'coated'..... symantics
- it's whatever base color that you select, then completely covered (about 1/2" deep) in colored chips, then dried & sanded smooth and clear coated. I did it the 3rd week of March & no scuffs, scratches, dents/dings yet...family using it, including the kids (ours, relatives, sleepovers + neighbor's) who somehow mysteriously seem to find ways to damage everything under the roof! All I can say is that it worked in our case.
 
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Old 12-10-14, 09:59 AM
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curved laminate solutions question & request

...I have a question. I am dealing with the same thing on curved laminate in my house as you described. I looked into a company called ******. Basically same process as you described but them doing the work. Would you be willing to share a photo with me of your final results? I just need to visualize before I leap. My laminate is in fabulous condition...just hunter green and needs updating ....

Kphillips
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 12-10-14 at 11:12 AM. Reason: Company name removed.
 

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