Stainless Steel BRUSHED countertops??


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Old 07-09-12, 09:05 AM
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Stainless Steel BRUSHED countertops??

Does anyone own or know if a BRUSHED stainless steel countertop can be installed? MY husband is incredibly worried about regular stainless steel scratching. Thanks!
 
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Old 07-09-12, 09:13 AM
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Welcome to the forums

Why stainless steel? I'm not aware of any finish on stainless making it more durable than another.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 09:27 AM
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..... and what if the brushed stainless gets scratched in an opposing direction
 
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Old 07-09-12, 10:09 AM
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I think they call that "patina" in the cooking trade.

It will not stay perfect without massive amounts of maintenance and care during use. Even then they can stain if certain substances are allowed to remain on the surface too long. I've been around SS cooking surfaces quite a bit between my Navy years and a few jobs when I was younger. Their main benefits are easy sterilization/cleanup, resistance to heat, and low maintenance (as long as you don't care about looks).
 
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Old 07-09-12, 10:20 AM
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With that being said then, what about putting some sort of auto-grade clear coat on top of the stainless?????
 
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Old 07-09-12, 10:25 AM
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Paint is going to be less durable than stainless steel.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 11:43 AM
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It's not as much for the durability as it would be to decrease scratches
 
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Old 07-09-12, 11:48 AM
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Sorry, I still don't see how paint would help.

Again, why do you need stainless steel?
 
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Old 07-09-12, 12:13 PM
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Yes, brushed stainless steel counters can be installed. It's done all the time in commercial and industrial applications. If welding is required it's polished out like the rest of the counter. About the most aggressive polish I've seen on counters is 3B which looks nice when it's done well but is shows cross scratches pretty well. It's about what you'd expect to see on process equipment in a brewery or dairy plant and it can be sanded/polished to return it to it's original finish. For counters I personally like a BA or 2BA finish which does not look so "processed" and daily scratches blend in more easily though it is difficult to polish out.. That finish as with most the others will eventually take on a dull mat finish as the random scratches and bumps of use blend together. Look at a stainless sinks both new and old and you can get a good idea of how it will look over time.

Never paint or apply a protective coating to stainless. It's sort of like the 70's trend of covering the furniture with cheap plastic covers. Just say "no". Very soon the coating will scratch and wear through and you are left stripping it off. Just let the stainless take on it's patina of use and don't worry about it.

One thing to learn with stainless is to NEVER use any product containing chlorine. You can use acid and alkali based cleaners and sanitizers but no chlorine. Chlorine removes the passivation which is what protects stainless steel and makes it "stainless" (rust resistant). Cleaning with chlorine can make the metal susceptible to rusting and pitting.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 04:19 PM
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Thank you to the last comment. That is incredibly informative. I am going to have my husband read it! We are basically trying to decide between stainless and solid like granite or marble. He is just for some reason overly worried about stainless. I am also worried the stainless would look too modern against our mahogany finish oak bar. Any advice?
 
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Old 07-09-12, 05:14 PM
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I started in a machine shop when I was 14 that did a lot of stainless fabrication for the food and pharmaceutical industry and I've been working on my wife to let me put stainless counters in our kitchen. She thinks they would look too commercial and too sterile.

Granite is nice and warm (by comparison) and is available in a multitude of patterns and colors. Unfortunately it is not forgiving of anything dropped or sat down too hard. And, after 15 years of being popular it's available in every home center and everyone has it.
Stainless counters have considerably more give by comparison so glass and delicate items can be sat down without so much care. And, due to the labor required to fabricate stainless it is one of the current premium materials (read expensive).

If shopping for granite I'd look for the right pattern, color & price and go with it. With stainless I'd spend a lot of effort to find the best installer/fabricator. Granite is easy by comparison. Slabs of stone are cut by a robot, mechanically ground & polished and plopped in place. Quality stainless work is a bit more like building a fender for a Duesenberg (expensive). Metal is cut to size. The bullnose and backsplash profile are broke (pressed with machines to form the shape) and then the pieces get welded together and receive a lot of grinding and polishing. Straight sections of counter are relatively standard and affordable. Things like an island with four finished sides, an "L" shape or having the sink seamlessly fabricated in then things can get a bit more pricey like $50-$200 per square foot for quality work.

If you have your heart set on stainless but find the price horrifying look into stock commercial kitchen blanks that can be modified to work in your kitchen. They are high quality and intended for heavy commercial use. You either have to make your kitchen work with them or pay to have them modified to fit your kitchen which is usually much cheaper than totally custom.
 
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Old 07-10-12, 05:44 AM
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I'm a quartz fan myself when it comes to countertops.
 
 

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