Repair wall after removing formica backsplash

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  #1  
Old 11-03-12, 10:43 AM
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Repair wall after removing formica backsplash

Hi, I am new here and am looking for some advice in my kitchen remodel.

Our house was built in 1940. We are replacing the kitchen sink, countertop, and backsplash. Because of the lead paint, it would nearly double the cost of the remodel for the contractor to remove the formica backsplash, so I am doing that myself. My question is about how to repair the wall afterwards.

The backsplash is about 7" high and runs between the counter and the chair rail (about 85" total). There is a wall-mounted faucet half way along.

I have pulled off the end piece, and it doesn't look like drywall -- it look like a layer of mortar covered with a layer of plaster. This wall was originally an outside wall.

What's the best way to restore the wall? The new backsplash will be tile. Thanks in advance for your help.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-03-12, 11:43 AM
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Welcome to the forums Belle!

With the age of the house I would assume you have plaster walls but if it was originally an exterior wall - it might be hard to say. Pics might be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

I'd probably clean the wall up good and apply a coat of durabond to level everything out. Durabond can be difficult to sand so it pays to apply it as neatly as you can.
 
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Old 11-03-12, 01:42 PM
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Hi Mark, Thanks for responding! Here's the picture of the wall.

Yes, we do have plaster interior walls.
 
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Old 11-05-12, 04:33 AM
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it look like a layer of mortar covered with a layer of plaster.
Sounds like a good guess
As long as everything is dry I think I'd still go with durabond for the repair.
 
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Old 11-05-12, 01:05 PM
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Thanks for the thoughts. Can you answer one more question? My local Lowe's doesn't sell anything called Durabond, and looking at the web, I am finding quite a lot of products called "Durabond", none of which seem to be a patching compound. So I don't know what I should be using. Can you describe the product a little further? Who makes it, and where can I buy it? Thanks!
 
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Old 11-05-12, 01:45 PM
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Durabond is a setting compound. In other words it dries chemically instead of air evaporation. It dries harder than the typical joint compound that comes in a bucket. Easy-Sand is another brand of setting compound although I'm partial to durabond. Setting compounds come in different setting times; 90 minute, 45 min, and 20 minute are the most often used. I usually buy mine at the paint store but I think I've also bought it at one of the big box stores.

Here's a link to the Durabond site - SHEETROCK Brand DURABOND Setting-Type Joint Compounds by USG Corporation
 
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