Tile Shower Pan Flooring

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  #1  
Old 01-22-13, 04:49 PM
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Tile Shower Pan Flooring

Hello everyone!

I have what is probably a real quick question about building a tile shower. I have stripped down my bathroom to studs and floorboards. Initially I was planning to put in a tub, so I put down mortar and 1/2" hardie over the existing floorboards throughout the room. Now we have decided to scrap the tub idea and build in a tile shower. My only real question here, is what do you guys think about building the pan right on top of the hardiebacker? (with roofing felt or similar under it of course) Or should I put down a plywood base? I definitely want to do this right, so it doesn't matter to me if I need to put down plywood, just delays the project a tiny bit. Any thoughts are appreciated. Even if I'm way off track!
 
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Old 01-22-13, 06:11 PM
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Here's the way most tile guys prepare their shower pans. It is rock solid and the method is almost infallible. Take a look at their method and let us know if you have any questions. How to build a shower - Building a shower pan with pre-sloped mortar bed, liner and curb.
 
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Old 01-22-13, 06:18 PM
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Thanks Chandler. I have read that article a handful of times and plan to build the actual shower with that method, was just curious if I could skip the plywood since I already have a solid hardie base. It sounds like you're advising throwing in a plywood base anyway, so that is good enough for me. I appreciate the input.

Thanks
 
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Old 01-23-13, 04:17 AM
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Not necessarily. You basically need a base to which you can apply the lath.
 
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Old 02-21-13, 06:16 PM
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So I could use an opinion. I got the preslope poured and the angle seemed correct. Now that I've laid the liner down I poured some water in to test drainage and it seems the liner makes it slope up slightly at the drain which is making it pool a little. Is there a way I can fix that without tearing out the preslope and trying again?
 
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Old 02-22-13, 03:24 AM
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You don't "pour" a preslope, you pack it in. This would have assured a smooth flow and no pooling. You may can dodge the bullet, but the video shows the correct method.
 
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Old 02-22-13, 03:58 AM
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I use the term pour interchangeably (and incorrectly). I did pack the preslope per best practice. Everything looked great. Just now that it has the liner in there it seems to have raised just enough to pool right around the edge of the drain if the water doesn't have enough momentum. How would one dodge said bullet in your reply?
 
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Old 02-22-13, 04:14 AM
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OK, good. Pooling around the drain, unless it is a large quantity, is no real problem. The main thing is you want your water moving in that direction toward the weep holes in the drain assembly that attaches to the liner. You will create a more defined slope with the final pack to create that momentum. You can post pictures as you go so we can see what you are seeing and make corrections as you go, if needed. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 02-23-13, 05:48 AM
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Hopefully you can see what I'm talking about in these pics.

Before I packed in the preslope:


With preslope:


With liner:


Pooling water (if you can see it). It's not a lot, just want to make sure it's ok before I put in the rest and find out in a few years. The puddle is right over the R.


Let me know any thoughts you notice (even if its not about the water). Also was curious if having more than 10" up the wall of liner was frowned upon? Figured more the better since I had a bit extra.

Thanks for looking at it.
 
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Old 02-23-13, 06:43 AM
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It does not look like you have enough nailing surfaces in the corners to securely attach your cement boards to the studs. I would add at least one 2x4 to each of the corners.

I would also add insulation to that outside wall and think now about maybe adding some additional liner to help water tight the window area as long as the walls are open.

I also usually install slightly wider blocking between the studs, but any is better than none.

Since you have to add additional nailing surfaces, you will have to peel back the liner. At that time, you can address the slope issue around the drain with some floor patch to even out the divot in the preslope.
 
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