Bathroom Hardwood floor replacement

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  #1  
Old 02-05-13, 10:53 AM
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Bathroom Hardwood floor replacement

I hate to even consider this, but I need to do something with the floor in one of the bathrooms on our second floor.
The floor in most of the house (including this bathroom) is over 75yrs old.
With three small children, the floor in the bathroom they use is getting destroyed. The area around the tub is starting to show signs of water damage.

Any suggestions on a flooring I could go with which would not look out of place in 1930's style construction (10" baseboards, etc), that would be tough enough to survive children and water for a number of years (hear they move out by 30yrs old now)?

Here is a picture I have on hand of the bathroom. It's not great, but it gives an idea of the look I'm dealing with.
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  #2  
Old 02-05-13, 11:46 AM
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Ceramic tile. Lots of styles out there so I'm sure you can find something which will look good.

Of course, now we have to start talking about the subfloor and structure underneath - what do you have?
 
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Old 02-05-13, 12:50 PM
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Will need to confirm this area, but the main floor (same hardwood from the original build) is diagonally laid plank, joists 24" center to center.
I think the second floor where this bathroom is located is 16" C2C or has a second layer to the subfloor as there is very little give or bounce to it unlike the main floor.
I'll crawl through the false ceiling on the main floor and see what I can see. I have a ~2ft crawl space between the ceiling on the main floor and the joists of the second floor.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 12:59 PM
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Yeah, it would be good if this had structure closer together than 24" OC.
 
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Old 02-05-13, 05:04 PM
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Mike, I would refinish the flooring that you have now - chemically, not by sanding - and apply at least three coats of clear poly. That's a beautiful vintage floor, and taking it up to start the tile floor seems a bit of a shame - IMO.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 04:31 AM
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Originally Posted by mitch17
Yeah, it would be good if this had structure closer together than 24" OC.
I was able to confirm that the second floor (and third) is also 24" OC other then the on suite bathroom in the one bedroom (not the bathroom in question). The on suite bathroom is not floor boards like the rest of the house and is actual plywood. If I had to guess, it wasn't a room or a normal room back in the day, which would drop my count of estimated bedrooms to ~13 bedrooms in this house originally.
Originally Posted by Nashkat1
Mike, I would refinish the flooring that you have now - chemically, not by sanding - and apply at least three coats of clear poly. That's a beautiful vintage floor, and taking it up to start the tile floor seems a bit of a shame - IMO.
I feel the same about replacing the hardwood and if I can fix it so it'll survive the kids for many years, that is what I will do. I'll need to do the same to the entire main floor (~1345sqft) which includes the kitchen.
Slightly off topic, I confirmed last night that ~90% of the house is original hardwood. The 1960's laminent flooring in the second floor hallway has 1/2" plywood subfloor, on top of the hardwood. Not sure yet how it was attached to the hardwood. Also confirmed that the stairs are also real hardwood under the nasty carpet. Not only is it real wood, but it's about 1 3/4" thick. Dealing with the subfloor and stairs will be another thread.
 

Last edited by Northern Mike; 02-06-13 at 04:32 AM. Reason: Fixed quotation code mistake
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Old 02-06-13, 07:31 AM
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I agree with Bill - while I would be looking at ceramic to replace this I would see if I could salvage the wood first. I originally responded as if that had already been eliminated as a possibility.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 07:57 AM
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Ya, I haven't removed anything yet. I'm just looking into options going forward.
The wood is currently salvageable still. If left as is, it won't be in a year or two.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 01:45 PM
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Post a sign behind the toilet at eye level....."We Aim to Please....You Aim too, Please"
 
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Old 02-06-13, 01:48 PM
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Haha. It's the tub more then anything. All three kids are under 4. So getting water everywhere happens no matter how quick I am with the towel.
 
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Old 02-06-13, 04:24 PM
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I'll cast my vote with the keep the wood guys. I like the look of wood and some of the newer finishes will stand up well to water.
 
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