Need suggestion on waterproofing shower

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  #1  
Old 04-21-13, 02:50 PM
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Need suggestion on waterproofing shower

Well, here I am again with our small shower issue.

I had this discussed about a year ago, in electrical appliances.
Problem is, it's a small shower room with no HVAC vent in it. Single double pane window. Ceiling fan.
It's shower normally used by my son, who showers long and hot, steam all over.

Basically, there is so much humidity condensation inside that small room, that walls had mildew all over them, and fast. I installed powerful Panasonic humidity sensing fan, but that did not help much. Also, even when not used, that fan was kicking in continuously, as it's overall quite humid here in Seattle area.

I had walls repainted twice, but mildew keeps coming back, simply because condensate drips down the walls after showering.

Out of desperation, I told him to start using our master bedroom shower room. Of course, that results in continuous overlaps and situations.

At this point, I need suggestion on how to refurbish that shower room to let him back in.

My idea is simple. Cut additional HVAC floor vent in for winter times into the floor, maybe even have duct fan added.
Next, I think, simply tiling floor and walls.
Questions are:

1. With that much condensate inside, will it keep rotting underneath the tile?
2. I know there supposed to be cement board installed, for tiling. Do we have to strip current drywall then? Room is rather small, if not tiny, and adding anything on top of current drywall will steal a lot of its size.
3. Is there something like a water sealing film or backing that needs to be added before tiling?
As outside of full tiling, I do not see another way of stopping this madness.


 
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Old 04-22-13, 04:20 AM
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You need an exhaust fan but using a different paint should help. Bath rm paints have extra mildewcide and are formulated for the harsher environment of a bath rm with shower. Leaving the door open after a shower and maybe using a small fan inside the bath rm may also help.

It's ok to tile directly over drywall providing it's not a wet area like the shower stall walls.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 08:37 AM
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I have fan.
I have quite powerful Panasonic humidity sensing fan in the ceiling. And it works fine, I was on the roof and checked with my hand - a lot of air outflow.
DOES VERY LITTLE DIFFERENCE, WALLS STILL DRIPPING WITH CONDENSATE.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 11:16 AM
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Maybe the fan is in a bad location for removing the moist air
 
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Old 04-22-13, 12:19 PM
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I noticed you said there was no HVAC vents in the room. A fan can only move air if there is air to replace it.
Not sure if you have any part of the room where you can install a vent to let air into the room. If it's stricktly a shower room, maybe a door vent?
 
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Old 04-22-13, 06:25 PM
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Maybe it is in the wrong spot. It is not directly above the shower.
Mike, you have the point. This is why, esp winter time, it is nothing but a cold small box condensation moisture.
But, like I said, fan sucks air out quite well, as I had hand on the roof against the vent flute. It is blowing out quite well.
Personally, I'd rather have a direct fan in the window or wall right above it, blowing straight out.



I sort of got it fixed, with Kilzall thick several layers and 3 layers of latex paint, but it still shows. And I fear letting him back into that room.

So, let me sum up. You think, best is to simply re-paint using some mildew resistant paint? Maybe oil paint? I don't care if it does not breath.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 02:47 AM
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Did you remove the mildew before applying the primer? Just covering it up with primer/paint won't stop it from returning. I'd clean up the mildew with a bleach/water solution, rinse well and then apply a coat or two of a quality bath rm latex enamel. While oil base seals better, oil base coatings will mildew quicker than latex coatings.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 08:18 AM
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ukrbyk, when you tested the fan, did you have the door closed (like when you are having a shower?

Back in my early days of computers, I use to design enterpise class networks, including server cabinets and server rooms. Although slightly different, the concept is the same. We wanted to remove hot air, you want to remove moist air.
I generally designed with inlet vents near the bottom of a cabinet, and fans forcing air out the top.

With no air inlet in the bathroom, the fan will move less air.
 
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Old 04-28-13, 08:03 AM
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Does anyone know if Aqua tile can be installed directly over the painted wall, or it needs to be stripped down to the drywall?
Make thing better, house is painted with that "bubbled" paint, it's all textured. I need to know if I want to tackle all this myself, or get a hand for hire.
 
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Old 04-28-13, 12:22 PM
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Not sure what 'bubbled' paint is - is it texture paint?

Most tiles can be installed over paint but a texture paint might present a problem since it's not as hard/solid as most paints. You might try and see how well it sands.
 
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Old 04-29-13, 05:14 AM
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Would it be possible to see a close up of the paint finish?
You might be able to get away with a quick rough up of the paint, or a mud and go.
 
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Old 05-01-13, 04:06 PM
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I would only install tile onto a tile backer. It's probably easier and faster to replace the drywall where the tile will be than to try to prep it into shape - if that's even possible.
 
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Old 05-01-13, 04:20 PM
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We decided to spray it once in a while with mold killing spray, and in 2 years redo entire house, as we will do paint, granite tops, and then will tile both shower rooms. No point in patching it now.
Thank you all for responses.
Yes, it's textured paint. Well, texture is sprayed on and painted over.
 
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Old 05-02-13, 04:26 AM
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There is a big difference between texture paint and texture that is applied, then primed and painted. In dry applications it's ok to install tile over painted texture providing the texture/paint is in sound condition. Texture paint is softer/thicker and may not be a good substrate for tile.

I still think installing an HVAC vent and using a bath rm paint is your best bet.
 
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