Bathroom skylights-- a drippy mess?


  #1  
Old 11-10-13, 04:20 PM
J
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Bathroom skylights-- a drippy mess?

Hi all,
Our main bathroom is in the center of our one story house, and it has no windows. No ventilation there, save for the ceiling vent/fan; so we get a fair amount of condensation on all surfaces, plus, there's no outside light coming in.

When I renovate, I'm thinking of adding a full sized skylight between the joists. My concern is condensation dripping from the the edges of the skylight on a regular basis. You know, you're standing in the bathroom and "plunk, plunk" ice cold water is falling from the ceiling onto your head. Does anyone have a solution or know of a skylight specifically designed for this application? Thanks..
 
  #2  
Old 11-11-13, 12:38 AM
F
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I have a two-foot square skylight in my front bathroom and it has never dripped any condensation in the almost fourteen years I have lived in this house. You DO need to use an insulated skylight and ideally the exhaust fan would take suction near the top of the light shaft. My bathroom exhaust fan is an el cheapo 50 CFM model that roars like a jet engine and its intake is in the ceiling next to the light shaft so it isn't absolutely necessary to have the fan inlet near the window.

My skylight is directly above the toilet and the toilet is immediately adjacent to the bath tub. I like long, hot showers and if I don't run the exhaust fan AND leave the door wide open the mirror will fog over but again, never had any dripping from the skylight and no sign of any water having ever collected on the glass or nearby structure.
 
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Old 11-11-13, 04:24 AM
J
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I'd suggest a solar tube instead.
A whole lot easier to install, lower cost.
You would be amazed how much light they let in.
I've been in homes built like your's and have not even turned the light on and you could still read while in the "library".
 
  #4  
Old 11-11-13, 12:25 PM
F
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I agree with Joe, a solar tube would be far easier to install as a retrofit and with the reflective inside surface of the tube they do let in a whole lot of light. Further, they can be fitted with an internal electric light fixture so they still light up the place after dark.
 
 

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