Time to get rid of the pink bathroom


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Old 03-21-14, 05:17 AM
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Red face Time to get rid of the pink bathroom

It's time for the bathroom. We have lived with the pink tiles for way too long. But where do I start? I know I want to take all the tile down (it's halfway up 2 additional walls), replace the tub/shower, toilet and vanity. It's a small main bathroom. Because the house is a mid-60s I would like to take it down to the studs and put up new backingboard. (Why? Seems like a good thing to do and might make it easier for removing the tile.) I probably need help getting the tub out but I could probably remove the tile and vanity. My brother and sister-in-law are cracker jack tile setters so that will help with the cost.

I can pick out the new tub, toilet and vanity but once I decide on those - where do I start? My design skills are non-existent. Do I hire a decorator to put it all together on paper? Do I hire a contractor to put it all on paper? I need a coordinator for the project. Where do I go to find someone? I'm excited but nervous about tackling this project. It would be my biggest yet. $$

Any input is appreciated. You always come through for me. Please do again.
 
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Old 03-21-14, 06:10 AM
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First time remodel is a bit daunting. If strip down to the studs it will become pretty clear what you need to do. Here's brief guide.

Decide if you need to relocate or repair electrical outlets and/or switches.

Relocate or prepare plumbing fixtures (add isolation valves if not already there).

Install new tub. If replacing floor allow for new toilet (you might need to get flange adapter).

Install wall board (use proper type for wet or damp locations).

Prefit vanity and check for squareness of walls. Adjust if necessary.

Tile walls. Tile floor. Install toilet. Install vanity. Paint. Decorate and use.
 
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Old 03-21-14, 06:52 AM
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If only it were that simple
 
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Old 03-21-14, 09:16 AM
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Sure I left out a lot of detail, but if you or significant other is handy it can be done without too much trouble. If you have another bathroom to use in the meantime then it gives you lots of time to plan while you work. If you decide to go ahead with this we are here to help and guide you on materials and method.

About 4 years ago I did a total bath remodel and recorded every step via photos. If interested I can make those photos available to you to look at.
 
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Old 03-21-14, 09:34 AM
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Say it ain't so...... the pink bath must go

The key is the availability of a second bathroom with a shower or tub to use. If you don't have that then it doesn't make for a very good d-i-y project unless you get a lot of man power and can work fast.
 
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Old 03-21-14, 01:53 PM
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Fortunately there is a second bathroom. Unfortunately it's in my room (master)

I AM going to go ahead - it's just a case of jumping in. I'd love to see those photos of your remodel so I have more of an idea of what to expect.

How do I get everything coordinated? I'm concerned about being sure that the tub that will fit and that everything will go together. What kind of specialist do I talk to?
 
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Old 03-22-14, 02:48 PM
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I AM going to go ahead - it's just a case of jumping in. I'd love to see those photos of your remodel so I have more of an idea of what to expect.

How do I get everything coordinated? I'm concerned about being sure that the tub that will fit and that everything will go together. What kind of specialist do I talk to?
Mary,
You can see my photos from the link below (copy and paste). They go pretty much in order from before to after. There are a lot of pics and I did an extensive remodel including electrical, plumbing, wallboard, tiling bath area and floor. Don't let these photos discourage you. To put it in basic terms, you remove the old stuff and work on each section as needed. Electrical, framing, plumbing, etc... The tub might be the hardest, but removing the old one will show you what you must do to install a new one. If your old tub is cast iron, use a sledge hammer to break it up. If its steel, you'll be able to lift and carry it out. Buy your tub after you get old one out. You'll end up getting the same size (outside dimensions). Insides come in different shapes and you'll want to be very selective.

Any questions, just ask the experts on this forum and they will guide you along.

One note of caution, if you decide to lower your shower so you can reach it be careful to maintain a minimum distance between shower and valve set. The reason I say this is because for some insane reason most showers are raised very high on the wall (usually over 6 feet) and most women have a hard time reaching the shower head to make adjustments. I lowered mine by about 10" so the everyone could reach it. You must maintain a minimum height between tub valves and shower outlet depending on the brand be it MOEN or DELTA or whatever.

Another note to make life a lot easier is to use Sharkbite caps to block off the supply lines to the appliances and still keep water flow to the rest of the house. They will just snap on and snap off.

Good luck and keep us posted.

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Old 03-23-14, 08:02 AM
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To make the job less daunting, I would suggest leaving the tub in place and only focus on the tiled walls and floor. The tub can be reglazed to any color you want for around $375 - $400. Just 'cause its pink doesn't mean it is not in good shape. Most likely a cast iron tub that will outlast all of us. I currently am updating some vintage hotel baths that are blue or green or beige and reglazing them all to white. You never would know it was a colored tub when completed. Takes about a day to reglaze and 72 hours to cure. It is also the last thing done before you put the bath back in service.
 
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Old 03-23-14, 04:04 PM
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Oh my gosh

Norm - Giving a quick look at your pictures, I've become freaked out about tackling the job. Hopefully after I get a chance to take the time and look at them all slowly I won't feel so intimidated. Do you have any idea what it would have cost you to have had all that work done for you?

czizzi - I have thought about leaving the tub and having it glazed but for some reason there's only about an inch into the drain before it makes it's 90 degree turn toward the septic. Is that normal? I kinda wanted to see what was going on there and see if I could possibly make that a little longer. Or maybe I should say have someone look into it for me. We could probably do most of the work with the exception of the tub.

It's still all up in the air though. I'm so afraid of making a wrong decision that I can't make any decision. Gotta just jump in with both feet I guess.

Thanks for your feedback
 
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Old 03-23-14, 06:02 PM
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I have thought about leaving the tub and having it glazed but for some reason there's only about an inch into the drain before it makes it's 90 degree turn toward the septic.
Yes, that is perfectly normal. If the drain is not leaking, then you have no worry's in that department. I haven't reviewed Norm's pictures yet, but understand, the tile portion will be challenging. It is not easy work, is labor intensive, and requires a level of attention to detail that is beyond many. But if you are determined, it can be accomplished. But you need to let us help you through the tough portions. Demo will be the first obstacle. Roll up your sleeves and get ready to introduce yourselves to muscles you did not know you had.

Are you ready for the challenge?
 
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Old 03-28-14, 02:58 AM
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Hopefully getting out this weekend to get an idea of what we want to put in there. Also need to find someone to coordinate for me. Need as little 'down time' for the bathroom as possible.

My s-i-l is a fabulous tiler. She did one whole end of the house in tile and did a fabulous job on kitchen backsplash at an angle.

It's the tear down that I'm concerned about. All the debris!

OK - first things first - figure out what we want in there. I'll keep you posted.

Thanks for all the encouragement.
 
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Old 03-28-14, 03:50 AM
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Oh my gosh

Norm - Giving a quick look at your pictures, I've become freaked out about tackling the job. Hopefully after I get a chance to take the time and look at them all slowly I won't feel so intimidated. Do you have any idea what it would have cost you to have had all that work done for you?
Mary,

Don't let the pics intimidate you. I replaced the whole enchilada including lights, sink, vanity, granite counter top, toilet, medicine cab, combo fan/light/nightlite over tub area, tile walls, porcelain floor and some custom cabinet work. It cost me $4009 including every last nut, bolt and nail (including a repaint job because we picked the wrong color the first time). I estimated that it would've cost me about $7 to $9 thousand to have it down. The point being that you won't need to go as far. Just determine ahead of time what you want to do. What items are you going to replace? Time will be your biggest expenditure. As Cizzi said you'll work hard, but enjoy it. One more point important point. You will make mistakes and you will correct them. I made plenty of mistakes. But all are cosmetic and were easily covered up or fixed. Necessity in the mother of invention. You sound like you have the determination and the help you'll need.
 
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Old 03-28-14, 04:00 AM
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Mary,

You question the ability to replace or refinish the tub. This bit of info might be helpful. If you have access to the plumbing from the back side of the wall (perhaps an access panel), then tub replacement won't be hard. But if you don't have that access it could be a problem. My biggest challenge was installing the new tub drain without clear access to the end of the tub. I had to use a two piece tub drain and shoehorn the assembly into place with just one hand (no room for two) as opposed to the original one piece when house was built.
 
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Old 03-28-14, 04:07 AM
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MaryP, there are more of us professionals in the background, reading your thread, so you have back up, too. Norm and Z are offering you the best way to do it. If they fall asleep, we'll be glad to help. We try to keep it as simple as possible. You can do it. It's like that first dive in the lake....hold your breath and go for it.
 
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Old 03-28-14, 05:44 AM
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If they fall asleep, we'll be glad to help.
I prefer to call it "beauty rest"...

I'm currently into numbers 5 & 6 out of 9 total bathroom updates at an older hotel. Not one of them are getting a new tub. All are getting re-glazed from blue, green or beige - to white (sorry no pink). The expense is not justified and the logic says - you start with a tub and end with a tub. The only thing different is the amount of money in your pocket. Again, that cast iron tub will still be going strong long after we both have moved on. It is a different story if you are going to remove the tub and rebuild a walk in shower only set up.
 
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Old 03-28-14, 06:30 AM
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I DO have access to the back of the tub so that should be ok. The main reason for replacing the tub (besides the color) is that it's not a good 'lounging' tub. I was hoping to find something that would be more comfortable for a little rest and book reading. But then again - how often would I REALLY do that. This is exactly why I start things in my mind so early. I could probably save some big bucks in not tackling the tub or in just having it refinished/painted. In that case, we probably COULD do most of the work ourselves.

Keep pumping the comments guys - I so appreciate it. Makes me think of things that are SO beyond my realm. Just like my kitchen and my french drain - I WILL get this done too.

 
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Old 03-29-14, 06:18 AM
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I want a wood vanity. The only place I know of to look for a vanity is at the big box shops. Where else can I look for a 60" wood vanity for under $1000? I'd like to have cabinets AND drawers and want to have two sinks.
 
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Old 03-29-14, 06:49 AM
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Couple of observations. Try looking ar surplus or salvage places. You may find a solid wood vanity that way. You can also spend $ on a higher end Kraft Maid. Next, when was the last time you shared sinks in a bathroom? Why have two? Women like their crap spaces. Wifey has one right mounted sink with doors under, and two banks of drawers on the left. This gives her about 4' of flat space for...hair dryer, hair curler, phone charger, tooth brush, make up boxes, etc. just something to think on.
 
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Old 03-29-14, 07:29 AM
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Will have two kids and one adult getting ready at the same time in that bathroom. Don't necessarily need two sinks - was thinking also fore resale. I'll see if there's a salvage place around here. Thanks for the info. Really don't want to go with fiberboard.
 
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Old 03-29-14, 12:30 PM
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Reconsider your choice of a solid wood vanity. I paid $360.00 at Lowes (2009) for a 48" x 31" 7 drawer and center door cabinet unit. Very high quality. Being the fact that its a bathroom with high moisture content, I think a a composite with all wood drawer and cabinet door fronts will more than meet your needs. Look at the construction of it. It should have a wood drawer fronts screwed separately to the draw front (not part of the drawer front). The cabinet door should be tongue and grooved side bars to the top and bottom and a solid wood panel either raised or relief as taste requires. The drawer runners should be on both sides of each drawer and not center type mounter under the drawer. If you want to go the two bowl top be sure that the drawers do not interfere with the bowls.

I have to agree with Chandler about the use of two bowls at the same time. Seems nice but will it actually be used. That will also increase you counter top cost and sink cost.

However, with that said, do what you feel comfortable with. You're going to live with it every single day.

PS...Your remark about resale. Certain things won't affect resale. I suspect an all wood (solid wood) bathroom vanity won't have a bearing on possible re-sale. Howerver the overall looks and condition will. I don't think a prospective buyer would care if a bathroom vanity is all wood or not. Only if its in good condition.
 
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Old 03-31-14, 10:33 PM
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I would consider the future too, right now you are able to walk well and you can get around well but what about the future? No one really knows if arthritis will hit them bad or if they later on have a back problem. My mom who is 87 now is at the stage now that she needed a walk in shower so we bought one that came as a kit that we could put together and it looks really nice. I see too that you seem uncertain about buying some things. Certainly everyone here will help you but have you considered hiring a contractor?

I know it sounds more expensive to have a contractor but he or she could help you make decisions and advise you. Just because you have a contractor doesn't mean you can't do some things yourself. I did I did the electrical work because I have done electrical work before and knew what I was doing. Even when you do know something though you sometimes need to consult the pros or look in on a post just to make sure you are doing something right. You certainly are on the right track and the pros here know what they are talking about.

The worst part is the demo it is really hard and nasty work especially if you want to get rid of a cast iron tub. I know I tried with a sledge hammer but wasn't able to break it up myself but my contractor friend was. So if you really want a tub I have to agree having the tub re-glazed is so much easier than taking one out and it will save you a tremendous amount of time too. I might have done that with our old tub if we didn't need a walk in shower. Don't forget insulation too you want a nice warm bathroom.
 
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Old 04-01-14, 03:07 AM
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Thanks Hedge - Hadn't even thought about insulation. Makes sense though.
I have talked to three people who have had their tubs re-glazed. Only one was pleased. That one was done two weeks ago. The others are one and two years old. They are chipping. Don't want to take a chance on that. How disappointing. So we are on with the new tub. Fortunately we have access through closet next to the tub.

I have thought about hiring a contractor but didn't know where to start. Then my s-i-l came over last weekend with my brother and they laid out a plan. I just need to find my vanity and tub. Fortunately this will be their 6th complete bathroom redo. S-I-L can't wait to get into the demo part. (Yee-ha!) Works for me. I want to do it - but I want to be on the 'helping' end of it.

The bathroom in the master bedroom has a walk-in shower so that part is taken care of.

I will look again at the vanities at L & HD and there's also another place around here that someone knows of. Probably will go with the composite (Thank you Norm for the info there). Also the single sink looks like more of a probability because 1) easier to hook up water 2) more vanities work with single sink. Besides, I will be here for another 6-10 years and I'm not the one using that room.

Every single comment here is read and re-read and re-read. Thank you all for sharing your expertise.
 
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Old 04-01-14, 04:13 AM
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Mary,

Is this bathroom an interior room (no outside walls)? If so insulation is not necessary for warmth. However, I did insulate the tub and shower section for sound deadening purposes. Also are you going with a shower/tub curtain or a glass door?
 
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Old 04-01-14, 05:49 AM
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I have talked to three people who have had their tubs re-glazed. Only one was pleased.
Very important that you choose the right individual to do your reglazing. Things you should look for and ask when interviewing reglazers -

1- Do they scrap the tub, remove any caulking and grip strips from the bottom?
2- Do they remove the drain overflow hardware?
3- Do they protect the tub from drips that can adversely effect the finish?
4- Do they acid etch the tub prior to reglazing?
5- Do they spray on a primer (crucial step)?
6- Do they offer a slip resistant base?
7- Do they spray multiple coats to ensure a shiny wet look?

For your friends who had problems, ask if they can see any gray primer? If not, then the job was not done correctly. If they were in and out in a couple of hours, then it was not done correctly. My guy takes the better part of a day to finish a tub correctly. My reglazer offers a 3 year warranty - I have never had to call him back for a repair. Most of these have been commercial baths that see much heavier traffic than residential.

The above was for reference to others wishing to save some money by reglazing the bathtub. In your case, good luck with the build and keep us informed.
 
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Old 04-01-14, 09:55 AM
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One exterior wall 9'. Small bathroom. I like the idea of insulating it for the deadening purposes. But then I won't be able to keep track of dear daughters half hour showers.

Going for the shower curtain. My shower door still looks good after 14 years but only because I wipe it down every time I use it. I'm sure daughter wouldn't. I like the curtain rods that are oval? or stick out into the room a bit? Know what I mean? And the curtains are much easier to replace than a door. Besides I think that the door would make the room look even smaller.
 
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Old 04-02-14, 04:03 PM
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For a contractor have you thought of Angies List? I have never used it myself as I have friends of friends who either are contractors or they know of good contractors. Friend referrals are the place to go first and then Angies list would be my second choice. A good place to look to see how contractors are rated on the web anyway.

One thing to consider is the quality of the plumbing supply my contractor and a plumber friend we have known for years said don't buy your plumbing supply at the big box stores as while the same name may be on the box the quality isn't the same for the faucet bought. The reason they gave is that the big box stores buy in volume and want cheaper parts in the faucet. We used Ferguson plumbing supply but you might have a different supplier that is more local and still be able to get you high quality at a low price. You can find them by doing a Google search.

As for faucets I suggest Delta as for the most part about everyone I have talked to has said that Delta makes the best faucets and they last the longest. Parts too are very easy to find for Delta faucets and very easy for the home owner to repair. I certainly would consider hiring a plumber too and maybe an electrician as some things might require special handling especially the plumbing.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 04:18 AM
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Thanks Hedgeclippers - I had never heard that about the faucets. I'll have to check out the plumbing supply places around here. I wonder if a big box store is not the place to buy a tub then?
 
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Old 04-03-14, 04:54 AM
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With all due respect to Hedgeclippers I disagree with his remark about name brand faucets having a two tier quality level. This is a common misconception for many products. MOEN, DELTA, PRICE PHISTER, AM STD., and others all have a lifetime warranty. No company will jeopardize their name or product by selling an inferior product. They may have a model that will be of lesser quality, but that will be evident by the degree of warranty and or price (I don't believe Moen or Delta have anything less than lifetime warranty). Within a manufactures product line only two cartridges are used regardless of style or shape. You have single handle or a two handle faucet, they all use the same internals within the same brand. Among many popular brands is one called AQUALIFE. They also have 3, 5 and lifetime warranty. However they are made or marketed by WAXMAN Industries. And they are of lesser quality. We sell them side by side with MOEN and DELTA.

There is also building products with a generic term called "contractors" quality. These type of products are low cost to contractors and just meet minimum standards. They usually are not top quality. Possibly (but I doubt it) the major faucet manufacturers might make a contractors line. But I would not want it in my house.


Mary, I would recommend Moen or Delta, but buying them at any big box store will not get you any lesser quality. You might want to look into buying them on-line (Faucet Direct, comes to mind) and you may get better pricing.

Also, when it comes to plumbing supplies such as isolation valves, and supply lines there is in fact cheap quality and high quality. And price will reflect it as such.

If I'm in error on my remarks, I would like to hear from people like Czizzi or Chandler to correct them.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 05:51 AM
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Many times the big box stores will have styles that can only be purchased at their stores and are not available elsewhere. Gives them an exclusive and something to toot about. So, even though big blue and big orange may be across the street from each other and both carry Delta and Moen, the selection will be different. The selection is also limited to those items that sell and literally thousands of styles are not available. Those that sell, many times are driven by the cost of the item and not necessarily the quality. I recommend to my customers who wish to purchase from the box stores to take something metal (like a wedding band) and tap it on the faucet. Many of the less pricy versions are chrome plated plastic with brass inners. For Quality, you want solid metal (chrome plated metal) or brass throughout. That transfers into increased price which is not necessarily the reason people go to box stores. People also want to purchase something today as opposed to ordering, another reason for on-hand inventory at box stores. But again, box stores only make money on inventory that sells. If an item doesn't meet the threshold for number of turns per year, it is discontinued.

As far as tubs are concerned, you get a choice of 3 or 4 tubs. Try googling bath tubs and see how many hits you get. Thousands upon thousands in every shape, size, color, depth, one piece, two piece, 3 piece and so on. You get to choose a tub that fits your space as opposed to taking a tub and modifying your space to make it fit. Also, anyone ever tried to special order a unique toilet from Big Box? I have - They shipped it via UPS and it came in twice cracked before we got a good one.

I have my customers visit a local plumbing supply house where they can look, touch and feel but also order from extensive catalogs with limitless variety. The product is always top notch, solid and with lifetime warranties. Rarely are any of my customers disappointed and they enjoy the experience. I also know that if there is a problem, I have a personal contact whom I can meet face to face with to get it resolved. Usually, it is just a phone call or text message and done.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 07:05 AM
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This is getting so complicated. I've found a local warehouse that has acrylic tubs. I was thinking about replacing my cast iron tub with another cast iron but there's sure some good looking acrylic ones. Any comments on one vs the other? I always thought cast iron was supposed to be best.

What am I looking for when I tap on a faucet? Appreciate the idea of buying online. Dumb question but do these plumbing supply houses usually have a good inventory to browse through? I'll have to find one here in Pinellas county in Fl.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 12:41 PM
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I have to agree with czizzi when he says that some plastic parts are in big box brands no matter the brand. I also agree that you will have a better selection of faucets if you go to a plumbing supply Ferguson is national but carries many more faucets than any of the big box stores. Here is a link to their location finder Locations Finder. I ordered over the phone but I suggest you go to one of their showrooms and look around. If you get really high quality fiberglass it should be fine but it can crack easier.

I know one thing I wouldn't do though is buy a tub longer than what you have already as that gets to be very expensive. You have no know what is a load bearing wall and what is not and you might have to move plumbing. You might consider a stainless steel tub they are light and durable, it is what we have in our basement bath and has held up very well.

Going to a showroom too you can get help in having some professionals come to your house if you get stuck. I agree the average homeowner can remodel their bathroom but there are always times when help is needed.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 05:01 PM
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Mary,

Consider an American Standard Americast tub. Its a very good compromise between an acrylic tub and a cast iron. My wife and I did extensive research before buying ours. I even called the factory to get info on it. You won't be disappointed with it. Wears like cast iron but is light like acrylic. It won't easily scratch or warp or stain. You use BON-AMI cleanser on it. It's light enough that I was able to carry it up a flight of stairs and make two hallway bends to get it into the bathroom.

No store will carry all faucet styles that are available. You need to go on line or vist a plumbing house as Czizzi and Hedgeclipper suggested. But you should be able to get a cheaper price online. That's what my wife and I did. As Czizzi mentioned earlier, the stores only carry what is selling. However, within the name brands (Moen, Delta, AM STD etc...) price will increase only because of style or features. You won't be sacrificing quality on any of the units they make. Currently oil rubbed bronze is the latest craze and you will pay more for just that finish as opposed to bright chrome. (Honestly though, Lowes or Home Depot has such a variety that I'd be suprised if you can't find what you like. ) It's strictly personal choice. But think of this, bright chrome never goes out of style and will go with any decor. Similar to white kitchen appliances. The colors and fads are nice but they tend to get dated quickly. We were planing on getting nickel finish but in the end opted for the bright chrome and we are now glad we did. My wife has changed decor and color several times and the chrome goes with them all.

It's not as complicated as we seem to be making it. It's just that the more questions you ask the more opinions you're going to get.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 08:13 PM
H
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I am not trying to push Delta but I wanted to make one other point. If you buy Delta they have a big variety of face plates for a single handle shower or even single handle tub and shower combination. Moen isn't bad either as far as variety is concerned but my plumber friend has told me it isn't as high a quality nor do they have as many styles.

Whatever you buy though and wherever you buy it price really matters. If you buy cheap you will get cheap. I also would consider a single long handle faucet for the sink it is nice if your hands get real dirty and you want the water on quick. I would also call and look on the a manufacturers website. I called Delta when I wasn't sure about the shower valve and their on phone support was super.
 
 

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