Bathroom Layout Advice


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Old 04-11-14, 12:23 PM
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Bathroom Layout Advice

Hi all. I am finishing my basement and trying to design the bathroom. In the process, I am realizing how little I know about bathroom design. Does anyone have any thoughts or advice on these three layouts? Any advice, ideas, comments or suggestions are very much appreciated.


[ATTACH=CONFIG]29824[/ATTACH]

Details
shower: 36"x48" (could change, if necessary)
sink/vanity: 24x21 (could change, if necessary)

The first diagram shows a 6" HVAC duct and 3 three inch PVC pipes overhead near the ceiling joists. Both interior walls can be bumped out between 10 to 15 inches if needed.

As you can see from this picture, I couldn't wait to get started. Now, I'm taking a step back and trying to make a plan first.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]29826[/ATTACH]

Without too much detail, here's some issues and thoughts on these plans:
  • Some of the options require more below slab drain pipe changes than others
  • Some of the options don't allow future access to shower valves - is that is ever needed?
  • Fewest water supply pipes on exterior walls (freeze concern)
  • Future access to existing outdoor faucet could be blocked in some cases
  • Only 20" of walking room between sink and shower on options A and B.
  • Option c has the most "in front of toilet" clearance and the most open floorspace
  • 6" HVAC overhead: should this be moved, or changed out to a narrower duct?

Option C seems best to me. Any thoughts, ideas, advice? Thanks!
 
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Old 04-11-14, 04:09 PM
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I wouldn't choose any option that blocks future access to any valves. That doesn't make any sense, to me. So if you have to move walls & pipes, do it. Insulate all the walls, exterior for cold & interior for sound.
 
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Old 04-11-14, 04:20 PM
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Install rough ins for the shower that have shut off valves integrated into the valve so that the water could be shut off for service right at the shower without opening up the wall.

What type of shower - prefab or custom tiled?
 
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Old 04-11-14, 05:12 PM
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Your problem is laying out the plumbing to code. All plumbing you see now is hooked up in the slab that way for a reason...

Any move and you also need to move the vent. That means wall demo..

Here is whats there now. You need to incorporate this same configuration when you move it..

1]Toilet line
2]2" toilet vent is actually the lav drain. The shower must tie into the lav drain/toilet vent so itself is vented.
3] Or else additional vents will need to be run...


Lastly who stubbed that lav pip out right next to the toilet and shower???? Wow.. I guess you can do your business in the toilet, wash your hands in the sink, and wash your feet in the shower at the same time...

That lav line in the wall should have been branched off left of the toilet..

Someone needs plumbing lessons IMO...


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Old 04-11-14, 08:33 PM
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Thanks Pulpo, I too thought blocking access to the outdoor faucet and the shower valves by putting the shower in the corner was a bad idea. It's good to hear confirmation on that.

I don't understand why the builder put the shower stub in the corner like that. I had an architect draw up some plans for the basement, and he too, put the shower in the corner?!?
 
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Old 04-11-14, 08:43 PM
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czizzi, are you saying if I do go with the shower in the exterior corner, that putting shut offs integrated into the valve will give me all the access I need? Is there likely any other reason to need to open up the wall behind the shower? Pipe leaks? Would you relocate the outdoor faucet so as not to block it? Thanks for the response.

Good question about tile or prefab - I have no idea. I can build things, but I have little experience designing/planning. I hear tile is more difficult to clean. What's the cost difference? I like the look of tile, but I think some of the prefab units look nice too. I just don't know the pros and cons at this point.
 

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Old 04-11-14, 09:16 PM
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djlamm, also, keep in mind Lawrosa's advice about the venting & code. Everything that was said has to fit into the plan.
 
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Old 04-11-14, 09:52 PM
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Thanks lawrosa! I laughed hard when I saw your response. I get a similar responses when people see how the stub outs were done, but none as eloquent as yours. The builder who did this is now out of business.

The lav drain/toilet vent is not actually attached to a vent going to the attic. That drywall was put in by me and my father-in-law (which was a big mistake IMO, so I intend to pull that drywall and framing out anyway, so demo is not an issue.) So, I can tell you from experience that the drain you see sticking out of the drywall is just a 90 degree waste elbow going straight down into the concrete. The vent put in by the builder from the attic to the basement ends, uncapped, as you see in the pic below, in the rim joist area (bathroom ceiling) on the east exterior wall.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]29842[/ATTACH]

I actually already have a plumbing permit in hand. The inspector came out to give me a "code consultation" and was quite surprised to see that vent uncapped. In fact, he made a point of telling me that he started as an inspector after my house was built and that he never would have allowed the vent to remain uncapped like that.

Anyway, I guess, in response to your post...I'm willing to redo the below slab drain pipes and get everything to code, add the vents where needed, etc. but before I go any further, I feel like I really to settle on where the new stubouts will go first. That's why my original post was more about where to put the toilet, shower and lav rather than venting and drain issues. If I know where the fixtures are going, then I'll know where the new stubouts should go, which will allow me to redesign the drains and vents to code.

I got ahead of myself by opening up the concrete.
 
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Old 04-12-14, 06:46 AM
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Plumbing correctly installed, does not leak. Designing a bathroom that assumes you will need to fix leaks seems odd. If you do your rough ins with integral shut offs, you give the whole mess a good test prior to closing up the walls. Cap off the shower, turn on the water, open the shut offs and let it sit at pressure for several days or weeks during your build. Any leaks will show themselves. Carefully inspect every solder joint prior to closing the walls up. Use nail plates to keep from accidentally piercing a water line down the road. Take lots of pictures so you know where everything is exactly so that if a repair is needed down the road, you minimize damage. Keep a couple extra cases of tile on hand should you need it down the road.

As far as the hose bib, add a shut off in the area outside where the bath will be and adjust the run in the walls to a straight piece of pipe without joints or elbows. That way, is it needs to be serviced, it can be cut outside the shower and pulled straight out from the outside and replaced. Copper comes in 20ft lengths if needed. In the winter, use the shut off and drain the tube that is behind the bath walls.
 
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Old 04-15-14, 11:08 AM
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After giving this more thought, I think I have settled on this layout:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]30038[/ATTACH]

This seems the best option since it
  1. provides the most open floor area for moving about
  2. shortest run for hot and cold water
  3. doesn't block future access to shower valve, if it ever needs servicing
  4. doesn't block outdoor frost proof hose bib, in case it ever needs servicing
  5. allows for a larger vanity
I'm having a hard time deciding on tile vs prefab. I'd like to go ahead and get the new drain pipes laid so I can patch up the concrete and then make the tile vs prefab decision later. So, how do I decide where the shower drain goes?

Is there a standard/common 36x48 prefab shower drain location? If so, what is it, and several months down the road, if I choose prefab over tile, will I have many choices in prefab or will I be very limited in selection due to the drain location?
 
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Old 04-15-14, 02:29 PM
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Decide what you want first & put the drain where it's needed. Otherwise you limit your choices. When I built a handicapped accessible bathroom, for my father, I went with prefab from E L Mustee.
 
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Old 04-15-14, 03:28 PM
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Red is waste..green is vent. Gets tied to that stub you have coming down in ceiling...

I like the sterling brand enclosures... mustees are dated IMO.


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Old 04-22-14, 09:24 AM
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Thanks guys. My inspector seemed to like Sterling also.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]30386[/ATTACH]

Will this drain/vent configuration work? The trap to vent distance for the shower is 37". Here's another view:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]30385[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 04-22-14, 11:28 AM
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FYI, and its probably OK, where the 2" ties into the 3" toilet line can be a max of 6ft from the flange...

All else looks good...
 
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Old 04-22-14, 02:17 PM
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Thanks! I'm excited to finally get going on this. I measured - it's 4.5 feet from toilet flange to where the 2 and 3" join.
 
 

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