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Tips for picking the best quality vanity for my bathroom, and fixing the wall?

Tips for picking the best quality vanity for my bathroom, and fixing the wall?


  #1  
Old 06-20-14, 06:14 PM
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Question Tips for picking the best quality vanity for my bathroom, and fixing the wall?

This summer, I'll be re-doing our bathroom. The vanity that we have is cheap quality (thank you condo corporation), and the particle board is rotting and rumbling. I'm new to this, and nervous as hell.



I want to replace the current sink/vanity that we have with something fresh and new. Preferably one with a single drop-in sink made out of porcelain.

But I do have some questions:
  • What should I be looking for in a new vanity in terms of material, wood type, porcelain quality, etc?
  • What type of porcelain holds up best? I don't mind spending a bit more $$ if it means it looks better and lasts longer.
  • IS it okay to buy this sort of thing from big-box retailers (Lowes, Home Depot, etc.) or is it better to go to contract suppliers that specialize in bathroom fixtures?
  • Any small tips that'll make this project go as smoothly as possible?

On a side note- the part of the wall where the current sink contacts the drywall is peeling. I imagine that there will be more of this when I rip out the old sink. Do I need to repaint the entire bathroom? Or is there a better fix, for this?
 
  #2  
Old 06-21-14, 04:22 AM
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Wherever you go to look at cabinets, ask them how they are constructed and what materials are used. They should have some examples for you to look at. I detest particle board but you might have a hard time finding a vanity that doesn't have some PB. Custom cabinets are usually better quality than 'box' cabinets [prebuilt and shipped in a box]

You'll want to cut any caulking that seals the top to the wall before removing it, that will prevent further damage. The peeled paint should be scraped/sanded and the depression filled with joint compound, sanded and primed. Then either touch up the repair or repaint the room/wall.

Normally the tops are sold separately from the cabinet.
 
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Old 06-21-14, 07:06 AM
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If you approach this on price alone, you will get little better than what you already have. Off the shelf vanities most likely are made of particleboard sides walls, waferboard backs, and solid wood fronts. The price moves exponentially as you upgrade the box from particleboard to plywood. First step up is from 1/2" particleboard to 3/4" particleboard - Next step up is 1/2" plywood and then 3/4" plywood. No need to go to 3/4" ply unless you are installing an exceptionally heavy top (which you are not). But is a consideration in a kitchen where you plan on installing granite counters.

The top you have is a laminate with a drop in sink. To be honest, if the sink bowl itself is in good condition, there is no reason not to re-use it. Unless scratched, you will hardly notice the difference. Next step up from Laminate tops are Cultured Marble. They are a poured into a mold resin base product that are very popular and easy to maintain. The built in bowl also eliminates the lip around to make clean up easier. Top of the line would be a granite top with undermount bowl. That depends on your budget.

The piece of material that is under your plug and where the paint is peeling is called a side splash. You want to incorporate one of these into your mix to protect the wall. You install with caulk under so that water splashed on the counter does not migrate into the area between the wall and vanity.
 
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Old 06-21-14, 02:21 PM
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Exclamation

To marksr:
Yeah, I feel the same way about particle board, too. But I'm not sure what you're referring to when you mention 'custom cabinets'?

As for the caulking- that damage to the wall seemed to be unavoidable. It's a cheaply-built townhouse. I cut the caulking and tried to peel it off carefully, but that drywall paint came off with the caulking. Really frustrating.

For repairing the wall- thanks for the instructions on how to do it. Is it best to repaint the entire bathroom, or can I limit the repaint to the damaged area?

To czizzi:

Thanks for all of that info. To be honest, we really prefer the built-in bowl because it seems much easier to maintain. With the existing one, water collects and all sorts of gross mold grows beneath the bowl.
 
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Old 06-21-14, 05:10 PM
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A custom cabinet is built in a shop per the customer's specs, normally they are of high quality. Box cabinets are built in a factory and shipped in a cardboard box. They run the gambit from extra cheap to really good quality. You have a select amount of sizes to choose from - no custom sizes.

It's possible the peeling was also caused by a poor primer or maybe no primer under the builder's paint. Touch ups work best when the paint is recent, the older the paint job, the more difficult it is to make the touch up paint blend. If you have the same paint, you could just paint the affected wall[s] I'd probably repaint the entire room since it's not really that much more work.
 
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Old 07-08-14, 10:21 PM
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Thanks. Noted.

Another question. So my plan on fixing that torn drywall is to cover it with joint compound, sand it down, add primer, then repaint that patch. If I'm repainting the entire bathroom (I might as well), do I need to reapply primer on ALL parts of the wall that will be repainted?
 
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Old 07-09-14, 04:07 AM
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The torn drywall should be coated with an oil base primer or Zinnser's Gardz before any j/c is applied. That prevents the moisture in j/c or latex primer/paint from dissolving the gypsum and more importantly from causing the surrounding paper to lift.

Only the repairs need primer although sometimes priming the entire wall is quicker or may facilitate a color change. It appears you only need to spot prime.
 
 

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