Staining Cabinets


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Old 07-14-14, 09:07 AM
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Staining Cabinets

Hi,

First time post. I'm taking the diy route and trying to stain a base cabinet to add to my existing kitchen. I want the stain to look like this one without the grain showing up too much. How is this done. Is it painted first or just multiple coats of semi-solid stain?

Portrait - ® Classic - Door Styles & Accessories - Merillat

Thanks,
Amit
 
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Old 07-14-14, 09:15 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'm not overly familiar with cabinet factory finishes but it's probably a dye, possibly mixed with a poly or lacquer. You might try using a tinted poly like Minwax's PolyShades. It can be a little tricky to apply, spraying gives the best results.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 09:32 AM
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I got the Minwax polyshade and first coat the grain showed right through. Maybe with second coat it might cover it more. I am using a sprayer and so easy and quick.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 09:34 AM
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What kind of wood was used for your cabinets?

In my mind, the grain is not all that obvious in the ones you posted because it's a light grain; not necessarily because of the way they were finished.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 09:37 AM
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Tinted poly is basically poly tinted with a little paint [an oversimplification] If you apply enough coats it will become a solid color. Don't just keep on spraying additional coats, you can spray on several coats but then you need to let it dry, then sand and repeat as needed. I like to apply a final coat of clear poly when I get done to protect the color coats from wearing off.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 09:39 AM
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I got the unfinished cabinet from Lowes and they list it as Oak wood.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 09:57 AM
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Oak has very visible grain, this is not going to be a simple task.

As Mark said, make sure you're doing a light scuff sand (220 grit) and removing the sanding dust between coats of poly, as this is needed to ensure adhesion of the coats to each other to prevent peeling.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 11:54 AM
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I'm going to try the multiple coats and sanding/steel wool in between each coat.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 01:25 PM
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You can spray on a couple of coats over a 10-15 minute period but then you need to let it dry, sand and repeat. If you spray on too much poly [too thick] it won't dry/cure correctly.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 01:41 PM
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No steel wool with water based poly - you can get rust if any of the steel wool is left behind.
 
 

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