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Had a slow leak; bottom of cabinet sagged a bit. What to do?

Had a slow leak; bottom of cabinet sagged a bit. What to do?


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Old 10-01-14, 10:12 AM
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Question Had a slow leak; bottom of cabinet sagged a bit. What to do?

I guess when I was replacing my RO filters last time I did not tighten one of them quite enough, so I had a very slow leak under the sink. The leak was slow enough that it caused the bottom of the cabinet to 'sag in' a bit under the 5 Gal water tank (green ellipsis in the picture). There was about a cup of water in the lowest area.

To give you an idea, the leak was so slow that we never noticed any water coming out of the element nor at the bottom, under the element. It's all dry.

I cleaned it all up now and have a fan drying it but - I am thinking to cut out the sunken part, so I can dry and clean up everything that's under also. I plan to make cuts like the red lines show.

Question: is there an obvious flaw with my plan? There is a granite countertop above, but I do not expect that a cut like this should cause a lot of structural problem?

 
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Old 10-01-14, 10:19 AM
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There shouldn't be any issue with your plan. More than once I've ripped out the water damaged bottom of an old cabinet and replaced it with new plywood.
 
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Old 10-01-14, 10:24 AM
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I agree that your plan sounds good. Easiest would be to cover the entire bottom of the cabinet with something new and you'll probably have to cut it in half to get it to fit through the door opening. Then I'd cover it with something waterproof. In my rental houses I use fiber reinforced plastic sheet. It's sold in the paneling section of most home centers and it's often used to make showers or line the walls of commercial restrooms. It can be cut to shape and it's quite flexible so you can bend it quite a bit and get it into the cabinet and cover the bottom without seams. Then use caulking to seal the edges and wherever pipes penetrate.
 
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Old 10-01-14, 10:27 AM
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I'd replace the entire floor with painted plywood. You will usually need to do two pieces to fit it in. I usually build a 2x4 frame with a center 2x4 where the new floor pieces join. I usually put the individual 2x4s in and join them with corner irons since the assembled frame wouldn't fit.

I do this because (IMO) using particle board where there is the possibility of being exposed to water is a disaster waiting to happen.
 
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Old 10-01-14, 10:27 AM
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Thank you! Sounds good.

An ideal thing under there (IMO) would be something like a pan, and then obviously - drop one of them battery powered water alarms under there (something I'll be getting for sure).
 
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Old 10-06-14, 08:00 AM
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Just a quick update:

Indeed, that was a relatively easy project. I love the oscillating tool! There is no way I'd be able to get in there with my jigsaw...

I cut out most of the bottom, built a frame out of 2x4's and laid plywood on top (2 pieces, to fit through the door).

The idea of using the shower pan barrier under there was brilliant, I think. I simply cut it too large and so the 3 edges are protected from leaking by it being folded upwards. So it is effectively like a pan on 3 sides. In the front, I ran a bead of silicone so water does not go under the plywood if some will drip from the counter area. Water alarm is on order.

Thank you!

 
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Old 10-06-14, 09:20 AM
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I think I'll have to try shower membrane in the future. It looks much easier to deal with than FRP sheeting.
 
 

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