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Water splashing under sliding frameless shower door

Water splashing under sliding frameless shower door


  #1  
Old 10-20-14, 01:24 PM
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Water splashing under sliding frameless shower door

Hi, and thanks in advance for any advice on this. And, please let me know if this is not the right place to post this.

I recently completed a DIY shower. Nothing very fancy--roughly 30x60 with a curb and a Delta frameless glass sliding door.

With the doors at the lowest of three available options, we are still getting a fair amount of water splashing out of the shower. It appears to be hitting the bottom rail that is on top of the curb, and then ricocheting under the glass door and out.

It's not a huge deal--we just keep a hand towel on the floor and mop up the water after showers, but would rather not have to do this.

Any advice for a way to contain the water a bit more? My thoughts so far:
- Add some kind of sweep or flap to the bottom of the sliding door, but that would seemingly interfere with the sliding.
- Mount something (like a clear vinyl strip) on the outside of the bottom rail so that the water would hit it and drip down and back under the door into the shower, but that may not be the best option. A little unsightly.
- Try and lower the door more, but that would require customizing the mounts for the rollers on the top of the glass, which I'd prefer not to do if it can be avoided.

Does anyone know of a good approach?

Thanks for your help,
Don
 
  #2  
Old 10-20-14, 01:36 PM
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2 things, is the curb sloped back toward the inside of the shower? Did the instructions dictate that you should cut the side rails to any extent during the installation for a custom fit? I would also like to see a series of detailed pictures of the installation to ensure that sufficient caulking was used in critical places to prevent leaks.
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 10-20-14, 02:23 PM
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Thanks for the reply, czizzi. Yes, the curb slopes into the shower. I didn't cut the side rails, although the question gets at what is almost certainly the root cause for the problem. The curb does slope down into the shower, but it is also *not level* from left to right. The right side is about 1/4" higher than the left. As a consequence, to make the top rail level, I added an aluminum spacer on top of the left side rail before setting the top rail down onto it. (Without it, the doors rolled by themselves.) So, that's the reason the bottom of the glass is a little high on that side.

I'm reasonably sure the water is getting out as I described, based on where I see the water, etc. Although the off-level curb would raise justifiable suspicion about water simply running down to the low corner and out, that doesn't match what I see in terms of splatter patterns.

I applied silicone to the inside and outside of the side rails, and to the outside (not the inside, per mfr instructions) of the bottom rail. I will add some pictures tonight to give you a better idea what's going on.

Thanks for your help,
Don
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-14, 03:28 PM
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While not optimal, you should be able to live with 1/4" variance on the curb. Make sure that the door closest to the shower water service is riding on the inside track of the upper metal. The further door will ride in the outer track and also should have a gasket that touches the glass. Is the gasket making contact? What you may have to do is either create your own set of holes for the wheels to ride in or set the two brackets in the same door at different hole heights. With luck there is enough play in the vertical frame to hide the out of level door.

You could also remove your spacer, and rig the wheels so that they do not operate as efficiently as they did so that they don't roll on their own. A length of string wrapped around one wheel on the attachment side will slow things up. You can also find or fabricate something that adds pressure to the door at the middle door guides. Glass shops that install custom shower doors have gaskets that attach to the bottom of the glass. They may be for 3/8" thick "heavy glass" only, but may be worth a phone call to see if they carry for a 1/4" glass door.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 04:38 PM
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Yes, the door on the water service side is on the inside, and the outside door is making good contact with the rubber gasket in the lower rail. (I've thought about trying a shower with the outside door on the water service side, to see how things go, but that would make it easy for water to make it out through the gap between the two doors, so it wouldn't be a solution.)

I think I'm more inclined to try and drop the door down lower while keeping the upper track level, rather than introduce friction either in the wheels or between the glass and the lower middle guide, but those are good ideas if lowering it turns out to be impractical.

Thanks
 
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Old 10-20-14, 08:45 PM
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Here are some pictures. For some reason the picture uploading isn't working for me, so I'll embed dropbox links. Please let me know if any trouble accessing, or if you want to see something else/more.

1. The problem area. This is where the water splashes on the floor (and the outside of the curb). The splashing runs pretty much the width of the door panel.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/xylzaycs0s...06.28.jpg?dl=0

2. 3. Caulking, outside
https://www.dropbox.com/s/gpmt8iqwyp...07.07.jpg?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/s/9m12b84doc...06.57.jpg?dl=0

4. Caulking, inside (side rail only)
https://www.dropbox.com/s/sxnv3gdul5...07.29.jpg?dl=0

5. This was intended to show the space between the bottom of the door and the bottom rail. Hard to see. I can take another picture if it would be helpful, but it's probably more informative to just note that the distance is just shy of 5/8".
https://www.dropbox.com/s/sfo6jxqi0k...08.06.jpg?dl=0

Thanks again for the help,
Don
 
  #7  
Old 10-21-14, 05:59 AM
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Looks like you are getting general splash from using the shower as opposed to the water running down the glass door and getting out. I am always at odds with door manufacturers when it comes to caulking. I do everything - inside and out. Of particular concern is inside the track where the horizontal metal meets the vertical metal. I always caulk those seems. Reason being, is that most people forget that you should run flexible color match caulking where ever there is a plane change in tile. Therefore, where the curb tile meets the wall tile should be flexible caulking. Most times it turns out to just be grout which forms hairline cracks and eventually leaks. By not sealing the metal to metal connection, you will have a leak that is not visible until your floor rots out.

That said, while you have a slope to your curb, it is very small, I usually look for a slightly larger one. Worst case scenario, is that you pop off the tile and rebuild the curb to the correct level. In the mean time, play with moving the outer most wheel to its highest hole which will lower just that edge of the glass. Don't rule out drilling your own new hole if that is not low enough. Then test your shower. Be careful drilling near tempered glass. One nick with the drill bit will shatter the whole door.
 
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Old 10-21-14, 06:37 AM
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Going to add a link to a previous issue from a member illustrating the problem of not completely caulking the shower door where the metal tracks meet. Water was getting under the threshold and into the wall cavity despite complete caulking on everything else. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/to...tall-leak.html
 
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Old 10-21-14, 12:36 PM
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Thanks for checking things out and for your feedback.

I didn't caulk the seams between the bottom rail and the side rail, but I can see how that is a good idea and I may do it. I guess I would also need to do the inside of the bottom rail or that would be a potential source for water to get underneath. In the meantime, I hope I'm okay in that regard, because I did use 100% silicone caulking on the wall-to-curb transition.

I'll look at lowering the door as my first option for the splashing-under-the-door problem.

Thanks again for the help.
 
 

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