HELP! Advice sought for granite bracket install


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Old 10-23-14, 11:18 AM
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HELP! Advice sought for granite bracket install

So I thought I'd save a few bucks by installing the support brackets for a granite bar counter we're installing but I'm seriously concerned about this and was hoping I could get some advice from those with more knowledge than me.

Took off the old (laminate) counter to find that the sill of the wall frame is a single 2x4.
The brackets I bought are the "hidden" type - requiring that I cut a channel on the sill to fit flush with the surface of the 2x4.
Basically it's like this:
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The new counter going on is going to be 16 inch wide 3cm granite (w/an overhang of 9").

My concern is that by cutting out that channel I'm weakening the structure too much. Examples I've seen online say to use a double 2x4 in this situation. Doing so would require me to take the wall appart and rebuild essentially (Do not want to if avoidable).
Wife does NOT want the thing any higher than it is, so slapping one on top is also not a good option.

Can anyone tell me if my concern is valid and I need to modify or if I'm needlessly worrying?
Thanks!
 
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Old 10-23-14, 12:32 PM
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Welcome.
3cm is very heavy as you may know. That said:
A 9" overhang isn't too bad, depending.
I assume this bar area is above counter level and resting on top of a pony wall.
So, you have a 9" overhang, but the other 7" of the 16 total is sitting on the pony wall, counter top backsplash, and an overhang of ~1-3/4" on the counter side.
So really, 16" wide bar is almost balanced.
The reason they tell you to double up 2x4's is not for weight, but for the screws to grab.
When screwing in bars, you will know if screw is torqued down or if you need to go to a larger screw or courser threads.
I don't see you stripping out screws, so you should be fine.

Your job, which is hard, is to get the brackets as level as possible, both parallel to wall and perpendicular to the wall to avoid shims on top of brackets.
 
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Old 10-23-14, 12:36 PM
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Thanks for the reply!
I bought the brackets from countertopbracket and they included the screws. Once the channel is cut a fair amount of the screw goes out the other side. Do you recommend I purchase shorter screws?
Thanks again
 
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Old 10-23-14, 02:10 PM
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If the screws protrude through the 2 x 4, no problem. Just make sure they hold as expected. I seriously doubt if you will be able to turn screw to the point of stripping it out.
 
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Old 10-23-14, 04:36 PM
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How thick and wide is the material you are using? and is it specifically designed for a stone countertop or just any overhang? How long is the stone and how many brackets do you plan on using over the distance. There was a recent thread that discussed hidden brackets. I feel comfortable with an "L" shaped bracket with a cross brace for reinforcement. Plane "L" or a straight piece of metal is not as strong as one that is designed for strength. Yours will have all the forces placed on the fulcrum end of the metal which also is the attachment point. That is how leverage is obtained, so simple words of caution. If you can bend the brackets with your body weight when installed, question the strength to hold the stone.
 
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Old 10-23-14, 05:15 PM
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oh, no risk of bending these things.
1/2" steel. 2.5" wide. 9" total length. So almost half the steel is on the pony wall.
Furthermore the counter is going to be "U" shaped and is cut from a single solid piece so odds are pretty good it would probably sit on the wall even w/out the brackets.
I'm more concerned with the weight of the stone moving the frame at the cut areas (since there'll barely be an inch of wood left after cutting out the channels).
As was mentioned any weight or movement will act as a fulcrum and I was concerned such a small amount of wood would compromise the structure.
Thanks all for the input. This sets my mind at ease. I can work with this now.
Cheers!
 
 

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