Tile replacement and wall repair question


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Old 10-28-14, 08:58 AM
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Tile replacement and wall repair question

I'm back again, you guys were so helpful I'd like to ask for advice on a tiling question. (Same kitchen reno as the counter).
I'm pulling off a small amount of tile (on one wall only and just the space between the cabinets and counter). It's tearing up the drywall underneath something horrible.
Is there a means to repair this? Do I need to if I'm adding tile on top (it's marble interlocking tile from home depot called grecian white. I mention this as I've read that marble tile can be finicky about picking up what's behind it)?
Should I replace the drywall entirely or do as a neighbor recommended and either cover it w/ 1/4" drywall or just plaster it?
Any suggestions those in the know can offer?
THanks again!
 
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Old 10-28-14, 02:28 PM
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Drywall itself will crumble in your hands were it not for the paper on the front and rear surface. If you break the paper on one side, you have degraded the drywall sufficiently to question the integrity of the installation. I play with drywall on a fairly regular basis so I never hesitate when it comes to replacing. I would definitely replace the drywall before proceeding. It doesn't have to look nice as you are covering it up, but it needs to be taped at the seams. Don't worry about where it meets the cabinet or countertop. Marble can lift the color from the mortar so you want to make sure you use a mortar type that is compatible with that type of stone.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 03:20 PM
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Hard to say if it must be replaced or if repair would be ok without seeing it. Pics would be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html If it is repairable, you'll need to seal the exposed gypsum with either an oil base primer or Zinser's Gardz before making the repairs.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 01:24 PM
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well that was a fun way to spend the day. Soon after posting the question I had an "oops" moment that resulted in not being able to get back online.
Long story short, took the drywall off and replaced it. Seams sucked but as was mentioned, with the new tile on it got covered up nicely. Looks amazing with the new tile on.
Thanks again.
 
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Old 11-21-14, 07:18 PM
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Also in a re-tiling predicament!

Just reading this post and the terrific responses, I'm already feeling better about my current home-improvement mess.

A single loose tile has set into motion a total bathroom overhaul. Cheap synthetic tiles has been hacked off, leaving several fun layers of fun to sort through:

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It would appear the putty-colored top layer is pretty heavily textured, and obviously needs to be chipped off. Yay. The mauve and pinkish stuff immediately beneath seems to cover rather crumbly drywall, though I think I can keep most of it intact.

**though truth be told, I will most likely be checking out the DIY drywall forums, while I'm in the neighborhood

Before I get in to making whatever necessary patch jobs must precede the
actual tiling, I was hoping for some advice. I did find a few black spots on the old grout:

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A simple bleach scrub has already removed most of it with ease, but I hesitate to move forward without knowing 100% that this isn't perhaps a deeper issue. If I can bleach away most of these coin-sized spots, should I keep going, or seek professional intervention? If I do move forward in full DIY mode, what's my next step after clearing away the old grout?

I've turned to This Old House for my project outline:

Saving a Soggy Shower Wall | Showers | Bathroom | This Old House - 2

...so it would appear my next step after exposing the drywall is to seal that in by a concrete backboard. Unless the white I'm seeing isn't drywall at all and is in fact a reasonably intact backboard? In which case I would skip right to final Jeopardy and dive into grouting, I believe.

I sincerely appreciate any thoughts - even if they're simply, "You're in way over your head, girl!" Thanks so much in advance!
 
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Old 11-21-14, 08:15 PM
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If this is a shower, the next step is to REMOVE the drywall and replace with 1/2" cement backerboard. Drywall has no place in a shower even though many showers out there have this configuration, most of them are in need of replacement. Please zoom out your photos so that we can get a better idea of the space you are working with. But again, if it is in a shower or wet area, the drywall needs to come out and be replaced.
 
 

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