Shower bed to wall gap


  #1  
Old 11-08-14, 07:48 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Shower bed to wall gap

What are my options to address the gap at the bottom of my walls?

I installed my wall first and would have had to use too much cement to bring it up to the bottom of the wall boards. Now I have a gap between the bottom of the walls and the shower bed.

The 'best' fix is probably to pull the wall down and correct it, but I'm hoping there's another option. I'll be painting the walls and floor under the tiles with a sealant if that matters. Not RedGaurd, but something like it.
Thanks for any help or suggestions.
-Steve

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJ0RijkxaFE&list=UUJEhLk7WGNBEJDPz40pEEjg
 
  #2  
Old 11-08-14, 12:22 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
The cement backer board goes up before you install your 2nd mud bed such that the mud bed holds the bottom foot of the cement board tight to the wall so that you don't use any screws that will go through the pan membrane. Did you do a pre-slope and a final slope or just one final slope. How is the final foot of the cement board held in place?

For reference, please read this article - How to build a shower - Building a shower pan with pre-sloped mortar bed, liner and curb.
 
  #3  
Old 11-09-14, 06:20 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the reply.

I did a pre-slope on top of mesh
Installed liner
Installed walls (nothing holding bottom foot against wall, but I cut and wedged the edges of the wall boards to hold the corners tight, though I agree that does nothing for the middle. I figured the caulking, thinset and tile would hold the bottom of the board against the wall.)
Installed final slope thinking I would need more cement and it would come up to the bottom of my walls, but that would have been too much.

Is there any way to address that gap without causing a problem or am I going to have to pull my wall boards down and re-do them?

Edit: BTW - I defer to your greater knowledge on the subject, but I found a bunch of articles and videos showing walls that were wedged down into the edge of the mud bed only to cause problems with water settling. Having that in mind, I figured I had to keep the wall above the floor by a hair. I now think that was for people who didn't do a pre-slope. I did see your linked page when I started the project, but because i was bouncing between different instruction videos, I didn't grasp that I should do the first slope, then the wall, then the second slope to hold the wall bottom. Makes sense now of course.
 
  #4  
Old 11-09-14, 06:42 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Don't you just hate hindsight...

If I may ask, how thick did you make your mudbeds? Is the mesh that you have over your curb also not burried in the mudbed? Trying to get a gauge, as a curb stacked 3 high would not have near 3" of gap to the mudbed as it looks with your 2x4 that is stacked adjacent to the curb. Should be more like 1 1/2" gap from top of curb to mudbed. Thinking that you may not have made your beds thick enough.

Further questions on the build, did you do a flood test? Last shower I completed, My flood test consisted of a balloon (test plug) down the drain until it reached the trap, inflated the plug, poured 5 gallons of water into the shower (before the 2nd slope installed) tipped my hat to the homeowners as it was a Friday afternoon and let it sit until Monday morning. None of the water had escaped verifying a leak free drain and shower pan installation.
 
  #5  
Old 11-09-14, 06:53 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Mesh on the curb also not buried. Still not happy with hindsight on that one either. Seems so obvious afterward because now I have a flappy mesh on the inside.

My curb is exactly 4.5" on the outside and 2" on the inside in the middle of the curb where the cement bed is at its lowest. The cement bed is at about 1.5" near the inside corners.

Could/should I just add more cement with acrylic mix? Seems like it would need a lot to slope up to my wall bottoms and that might make the edges near the curb too shallow, but maybe the layer of thinset and tile would raise it enough to keep it worry free from spill over.
 
  #6  
Old 11-09-14, 08:00 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Well you are going to have to bite the bullet at least a little bit. How high did you take the pan liner up the wall? I think you may be able to get away with removing say, 1/2 a sheet of durock all the way around. Then using a stiff 3" putty knife carefully chisel a trench around the perimeter of the shower so that you can replace with a new piece of durock cut to a new width such that it extends into the trench that you plowed around the perimeter. Then back fill the trench with either some more bed mud or some thinset to capture the base of the walls. Ditto on the curb to capture the mesh. Don't forget to mesh tape and thinset all your seams and corners. Then go to town with your redgard or hydroban to waterproof/vapor barrier the shower. So - 3 sheets of durock and 1 sheet of wire mesh is your penance for reading other sites and not stopping here first.

Shower floor tile goes in first, Wall tiles will go in after - such that the wall tiles cover the small gap you will leave on the wall tiles from the cement board. Finish after grout with flexible caulking in all inside corners of the walls as well as where wall meets floor.
 
  #7  
Old 11-09-14, 09:29 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Glad I checked in here. That doesn't really sound that bad. I was imagining pulling down all the wall work so far.

My liner goes up a min of 10", but up to 12" near a fold. So I expect I should cut about 8-10" above the top of the liner (so I have enough board above that to secure the new board) and remove all below that.

The act of chiseling that the short length of the shower on each side doesn't seem all that daunting, but I am concerned about accidentally cutting the liner. I'll use a stone chisel with a broad dull tip, but that'll require some patience and caution that I wasn't planning on expending this weekend.

Ok. Thanks for the help. I'll check back in again when I get stuck or get done. I'm very happy with my liner and the slopes, though now I do think the top slope could have been an inch thicker.

-Steve
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: