Placement of Gas Range


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Old 11-17-14, 03:00 PM
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Placement of Gas Range

Hi All,
I live in NJ and have decided to put the gas cooking range to the interior of an exterior wall. I have not come across anyone who did from alteast what I have been seeing and thinking if it is allowed or will I have to change its position.
The only reason is that Ii would to put in an exhaust that would suck out the smell and grease effectively.
Attaching a picture of the design.
Please help.

Thanks.
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Old 11-17-14, 04:41 PM
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This is a good question. As I think about it I've seen very few if any kitchens with a range against an outside wall. It seems strange to me because it would be very easy to vent the hood outdoors. On the other hand, many kitchen sinks are located on an outside wall where plumbing must be routed and subjected to freezing (my son in fact had a frozen drain one day because the builder did not properly insulate the section of drain that dropped from the overhang in the sink).

The only reason I can think of is esthetics. In pre-history before dishwashers, the lady of the house had to stand in front of the sink and do the dishes. She would have had nothing to look at to keep her sanity. On the other hand cooking does not require continuous standing in front of a stove. One may walk away to do dishes and look out the window.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 07:00 AM
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Thanks for replying and shedding some light on the design. The plumbing for the sink and the dishwasher are to the interior wall in this case.
The design I plan opens up the kitchen and not make the person cooking feel as if they are in a matchbox. The position of the plumbing make it hard to switch the position of the sink and the dishwasher.
The only other option is to move the position of the refrigerator to where I plan to keep the gas range.
I seriously want the smell and grease out but at the same time also would want to know if this breaks the code. As long as it not against the code and I could sell the house, I am fine.

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 07:54 AM
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Never heard of it being a code issue, but that doesn't mean it isn't. Local codes always trump logical thinking.

In addition, you want to be sure it doesn't exhaust directly below the soffit vents where warm moist air would be drawn back into the ventilation path. Also, exhaust fans are available in monster sizes and care should be taken so that fan doesn't reduce the house pressure enough (along with other exhaust appliances) to backdraft your heating or hot water, should they be natural draft appliances. Any exhaust fans at 400cfm or more are supposed to come with make-up air provisions.

In regards to drawing out all cooking byproducts there are guidelines for how high and how the hood is positioned over the range.

Bud
 
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Old 11-18-14, 09:13 AM
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Thanks Budd, that was a good point that you have put out regarding the exhaust vent. The outlet for the vent is under the soffit, cut directly to the wall so that it opens to the side of the house. It does not go in or through the soffit.
I have a 700 CFM exhaust and the make up air is through the attic where there is something like a small window with slats, really don't know the technical term for it.

Thanks.
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Old 11-18-14, 10:37 AM
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The soffit I was referring to would be the soffit on the outside of the house where cold air flows in to help ventilate the attic. If the soffit in your kitchen is connected to the wall cavities and or the rafter cavities there are additional concerns.

Below is a 2010 article on makeup air for range hoods. Note the 4 year old date and I believe the rules now require mfgs to include details about makeup air.
Makeup Air for Range Hoods | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com

@bv "I have a 700 CFM exhaust and the make up air is through the attic where there is something like a small window with slats,"
I question drawing the makeup air from the attic. Depressurizing the attic will increase the energy loss (air leakage) from house to attic and the related moisture issues. Makeup air should come directly from the outside and from a duct LARGER than the exhaust duct. 700 cfm flows out the exhaust duct due to a large pressure difference created by that fan. What you don't want is a large pressure difference across the makeup air vent, thus it has to be huge. I heard that scream.

In some cases the excess pressure is avoided by installing a second fan that brings in the required fresh air. In other cases a smaller range hood will do fine.

An important question I did not ask is what you have for home heating and water heating systems, Gas, oil, natural draft chimney, or sealed combustion?

Did you see any reference in the instructions with the hood/fan?

Bud
 
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Old 11-18-14, 02:14 PM
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There are no instruction referring of a make-up ventilation specified in the manuals that came with the hood.
The heat system is a hot water baseboard heat. You think I will have issues with this kind of a heating system. The furnace is a gas furnace and the vent for the furnace goes al the way up to the roof.

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Old 11-18-14, 02:36 PM
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The specifications of the hood regarding the CFM is as follows. I think i atleast have an option here to run the fan in lower speeds to avoid back draft.
SPEED QuietMode™ 1 2 3 4 5
Air Capacity (CFM) 300 420 510 590 640 750
Sone* (dB) 1.0 (40) 2.0 (50) 3.5 (58) 5.0 (63) 5.4 (64) 6.0 (66)

That was a useful link that you have forwarded.. Thank You Bob.
Now i wonder if i have to buy a smaller exhaust considering the factors mentioned in that thread.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 03:49 PM
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Running the fan at a lower speed is not a solution as someone will eventually crank it up to full speed and even their lowest speed is still 320.

If you have baseboard hot water heat you have a boiler rather than a furnace. Just helping with the terminology. If it vents through the roof then it requires a natural draft that can be over powered by your hood, especially when you turn on all other exhaust devices, dryer, bath fans and such. Even with a 250 size fan, someone should test for worst case depressurization to be sure no backdrafting.

Your diagram doesn't show a huge 6 burner range. Typically, the exhaust size is determined by the maximum output of the oven and range. That combustion process is producing added volume and the hood needs to be able to handle the extra volume plus a containment draft. Your range people and hood people should have all of these numbers.

Bud
 
 

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